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The Skewed Throne by Joshua Palmatier

  (6 ratings)

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Book Information  
AuthorJoshua Palmatier
TitleThe Skewed Throne
SeriesThrone of Amenkor
Volume1
Year2006
Editoryes
GenreFantasy
 
Book Reviews / Comments (submitted by readers)
 
Submitted by Seraph 
(Mar 23, 2007)

I really enjoyed this book. I think he captures desperation, brutality, and hope in the character of Varis. I also think he did a good job of making Varis a dynamic character. She isn't static. She changes. He even manages to give her a code of honor. I respect Palmatier a lot for that. It's easy to give such a code to a hero that lives in a nice world, even harder when that hero is "gutterscum".

The fight scenes are superb and the aftermath of each time this character kills is very well done. It's not often the hero takes a hard look at what he or she has done and why.

Palmatier has created a vibrant, living setting in the Dredge. But it doesn't stop there. The people who populate this world add so much to his narrative. I also find his use of magic to be wholly imaginative. I hope he takes this as a compliment, but I was somewhat reminded of Dune's Paul Atreides' use of future sight. Except here, Varis is far more practical and visceral.


Submitted by Seraph 
(Mar 02, 2007)

I really enjoyed this book. I think he captures desperation, brutality, and hope in the character of Varis. I also think he did a good job of making Varis a dynamic character. She isn't static. She changes. He even manages to give her a code of honor. I respect Palmatier a lot for that. It's easy to give such a code to a hero that lives in a nice world, even harder when that hero is "gutterscum".

The fight scenes are superb and the aftermath of each time this character kills is very well done. It's not often the hero takes a hard look at what he or she has done and why.

Palmatier has created a vibrant, living setting in the Dredge. But it doesn't stop there. The people who populate this world add so much to his narrative. I also find his use of magic to be wholly imaginative. I hope he takes this as a compliment, but I was somewhat reminded of Dune's Paul Atreides' use of future sight. Except here, Varis is far more practical and visceral.




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