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Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card



(252 ratings)

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Submitted by Demosthenes 
(Sep 05, 2004)

A thrilling novel which can make you smile and choke on tears at the same time. Ender is a strong character whose emotions can be felt by the reader. He is sensitive and intelligent and most of all perceptive. Ender knows himself, the people around him and- his enemies.
This novel is not only an exciting sci-fi adventure for any age but it also approaches worldly issues on a deeper level. Issues of humanity, politics, morals and values, war and peace, guilt, love, and acceptance.
This novel makes you question humanity, how seperate different cultures and countries are from each other and what would happen if all of humanity on earth were to bond together in order to fight for a greater cause. Scott Card deals with aspects of greed which effects so many leaders and politicians while the war against the buggers is going on. Many of the humans on earth are anticipating the end of the bugger war so that they can have their highly intelligent children returned to their home countries to fight for their country in a war against other earthlings. In the end, Ender's brother Peter, regains utlimate power of earth through his ideas and his voice, not through war. With the coroperation of all humanity, Peter supervises the development and colonization of other planets in outer space.
But Scott Card doesn't just deal with war between human groups or between humans and aliens, he also deals with war between peers, between students and authority and between oneself. At battle school, Ender must protect himself from the bullies who, out of pride and jealousy of Ender's great intelligence, try to kill him. Ender battles with the teachers too. Ender is constantly being pushed harder than any of the other students, he is being worn out physically and emotionally and his teachers are initiating the pressure and pain, watching the whole time without helping him, and Ender knows it. Ender tries to find a way to bring the students together and beat the teachers and their extreme expectations for him. Yet the conflict is so much more complex than a war between students and teachers. The teachers, especailly Graff, love Ender but they need him to be the best he can be so that humanity may be saved. Ender understands the importance of his training and suffers emotional turmoil as he feels rejected by his teachers and helpless in situations which are set up against him. For example, when Ender is on the space shuttle to battle school with his peers, he is exposed to the other children in such a way by proffeser Graff that he has a tough time making friends.
Ender also battles with his own sense of guilt. He feels guilt for fighting the buggers when no communication between humans and buggers is available. He also feels guilt for hurting others around him in self-defense, and in order to bring the best out in others, (as is the case with Bean). Ender also battles his strong and over powering feelings of love which he feels for his friends and for his sister Valentine, whom he still remembers after years in battle school.
Still the novel goes deeper, digging into all sorts of social and psychological levels. Forgiveness is a huge aspect by the end of the book as Ender is forgiven by the hive queen and given a chance to undo the xenocide crime he commited against his will.

Ender's Game, along with the rest of the Ender's Game series is highly recommended due to its literary depth and ability to entertain.


Submitted by Rira 
(Apr 05, 2004)

Ender's Game was a remarkable work. It was easy to read, without long, boring pages of history and detail that most books use to set the scene, but rather, Card lets you know all you need to know, and the rest in up to your imagination.

Ender is a wonderful, strong character, and very human. Yes he is a genius, and he is unbeatable, but the price is large, his childhood, and happiness and friends. He is isolated to create the perfect commander, who can do things for himself, and won't get to attached to any one thing. All and all, a sad, cruel existance. Whether he ovecomes, and the ending is happy is up to the reader, but the ending is a surpise, indeed, i read it and screamed! (my sister nearly had a heart attack!) and had to read it twice more to totally understand that what i read was correct.

And in it is some genius ideas by Card, one being the Battle Rooms, in which children are trained to fight and command in zero gravity. A magnificent and exciting idea! and just as excting to read about. this book fully dives deep into human physcology, sorry if that was spelled wrong, and the limits of the human mind. all and all, a work of pure genius and i recommend it to anyone, whether you like SciFi or not.


Submitted by Jasmine 
(Mar 08, 2004)

At first, when my teacher assigned this book to the class, I was reluctant to read it. I thought it would be some weird science fiction book about aliens taking over the planet.

When I read the book I realized that it was some science fiction book about aliens taking over the planet, but I actually enjoyed reading this book.

It was like I was sucked into the book while Card took me on an adventure with Ender through space. Once I started reading the book I couldn't stop.


Submitted by Enyardo 
(Mar 08, 2004)

A lot of reviewers havwe missed the basic point of the book. It's classified as science fiction, and it does have spaceships/aliens/lasers, etc... But that's not its main focus. It's about the nature of humanity. It has excellent character devolpment, a gripping storyline, and a great (if somewhat predictable) ending.

I reccomend this book for anyone that enjoys a book with plot/character development. If you just want shooting, then go watch a movie.


Submitted by Jasmine 
(Feb 15, 2004)

At first, when my teacher assigned this book to the class, I was relunctant to read it. I thought it would be some weird science fiction book about aliens taking over the planet. When I read the book I realized that it was some science fiction book about aliens taking over the planet, but I actually enjoyed reading this book. It was like I was sucked into the book while Card took me on an adventure with Ender through space. Once I started reading the book I couldn't stop.


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