Home Literature Stories Movies Games Comics Blogs News Discussion Forum Art Gallery
  Science Fiction and Fantasy News
Esslemont's Stonewielder Prologue and Cover (07-26)
Deals and Deliveries (9!!!) (09-12)
Iron Man: Femmes Fatales by Robert Greenberger (09-12)
Indiana Jones and the Army of the Dead by Steve Pe (09-12)

Official sffworld Reviews
Big Time, The by Fritz Leiber (05-29 - Book)
Rogue Clone by Steven L. Kent (05-25 - Book)
The Blue Blazes by Chuck Wendig (05-21 - Book)
The Wisdom of the Shire by Noble Smith (05-17 - Book)


Author

Site Index

Book Reviews and Comments    Bookmark and Share

Page 1 of 1

Seer King trilogy by Chris Bunch



(3 ratings)

Submit Review / Comment

More reviews by author
A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

Submitted by Tom Parker 
(Jul 30, 2007)

The initial hype created in the opening chapter by Chris Bunch creates the potential for a great tale of war, love and passion. In reality what it delivers is a disappointing tale of the stunningly over the top life of the main character (Damastes a Cimabue) who despite desperate attempts to portray him as an heroic freedom fighter comes across as an evil, cruel, vengeful character who any reader with common sense would perceive to be more in the style of the "baddie" rather than the "goodie". This is not the biggest disappointment of the book however. This lies in the writers desperation to pull what could have been an action packed 400 page novel across nearly 1800 pages. This results in desperate padding between the scenes in which Damastes impossibly (and ridiculously)lurches from near death situation to near death situation- each time finding another, increasingly unbelievable way to rescue. There is some consolation in the characters of Petre and Linerges, interesting characters who have depth- not just a horny murdering general but characters who have beliefs and feelings.This in not repeated in the 1799 pages that cover Damastes, his rampant sex life, his disregard for human life and his weak morals (hardly a hero). The story effectively ends after each book (the link between one and two is justifiable but the link with three is totally unjustified) in this characters are returned in increasingly unimaginative ways- by the end characters such as Curti who you had effectively been informed was dead returns to Damstes with a slight limp. This leads to you questioning every event as the writer merely reverses what he has said. The books are shallower than a paddling pool and would require a scientific operation to discover any hidden values that the writer floats across 50 pages suddenly informing you about a totally irrelevant character or event, allowing(to your immense relief) you to skim read a few pages, only 300 pages later to make it the crucial event of the whole book.
After reading nearly 1800 pages of poorly written, over-sexual non events you deserve an ending, if the book was merely 400 pages it could justifiably dramatically suspend the ending but as it is it only adds to the increasing disappointment and misery created for the reader throughout the book and instead of leaving you thinking "what next for Damastes" instead leaves you thinking "i've just wasted two weeks"
So my advice to you if you are thinking about reading the Seer King trilogy, expecting a story of brotherhood and friendship, is don't you will only be disappointed. If you have started and are wondering if it will get better it won't it will get worse- get out while you still can. There is only one plus, the books are available cheap-i just took mine down to the charity shop.


Submitted by Russell Norton 
(Aug 10, 2004)

This trilogy begins with one of those books (seer king), which you begin to read thinking its not bad, worth the read but an average book. Within a couple of chapters you realize your damn near physical addiction to this book. Told from the point of view of Damastes `a Cimabue a young cavalry officer, fighting hard in the numantian army against lawless bandits on the frontiers. Sent on a mission to protect a diplomat, the seer Laish Tenedos, a man with radical ideas, the cunning and courage of the soldier saves Tenedos' life and the two men become friends, a chain of events which will change the empire of Numantia forever. This is not only a book but the definitive lesson in honour and the way an honest, patriotic and proud man should behave in face of unmeasurable adversity. The second book in the trilogy, Demon King, still an amazing book, is less of a hugely inspiring patriotism rally but leaning towards the emotional journey but with just the same amount of war, romance, soldierly brotherhood and enchanting magic. The third installment, entitled the Warrior King, is shorter but goes back to the mix of unswerving loyalty to numantia, spectacular magic and seemingly random events and minor plots which all come together to round off the epic adventure. Throughout the trilogy, no reaction is tempered, no issues are glazed over and no taboo goes unspoken.


Submitted by Rodney Powell
(Mar 10, 2000)

Bunch has written a sweeping military fantasy epic.This is the story of rise and fall of a empire through the eyes of a man who help make it happen.Damastes, a young officer from the country of Numantia befriends a radical wizard named Tenedos and helps his rise from to rule an empire with bravery and magic.This series has it all:bloody large-scaled battles scenes, complex political intrigues, dark magic, and steamy sex.You will watch as two men become friends then allies and finally deadly enemies, shocked as a young man rises from cavalry officer to the highest pinacles of power and see him get disillusioned by intrigue and slaughter that it will take to rule and empire and see the man he helped put on the throne become a blood-thirsty tyrant who conjures up terrifying demons to do his bidding.So when you start this novel be prepared to begin a epic adventure you will never forget!




Sponsor ads

 

Latest

The Terry Pratchett Anywhere But Here, Anywhen But Now First Novel Prize!
05-31 - News
Stephen King's Joyland UK Promotion
05-30 - News
UK Publisher of Stephen King’s New Novel Unusual Promotion
05-30 - News
Big Time, The by Fritz Leiber
05-29 - Book Review
Rogue Clone by Steven L. Kent
05-25 - Book Review
The Blue Blazes by Chuck Wendig
05-21 - Book Review
The Wisdom of the Shire by Noble Smith
05-17 - Book Review

05-10 - News
The Tyrant's Law by Daniel Abraham
05-04 - Book Review
Galaxy's Edge 1 by Mike Resnick
04-28 - Book Review
Poison by Sarah Pinborough
04-21 - Book Review
Bullington, Beukes and Bacigalupi event
04-19 - News
The City by Stella Gemmell
04-17 - Book Review
Promise of Blood by Brian McClellan
04-15 - Book Review
Tarnished Knight by Jack Campbell
04-09 - Book Review
Frank Hampson: Tomorrow Revisited by Alastair Crompton
04-07 - Book Review
The Forever Knight by John Marco
04-01 - Book Review
Book of Sith - Secrets from the Dark Side by Daniel Wallace
03-31 - Book Review
NOS4R2 by Joe Hill
03-25 - Book Review
Fade to Black by Francis Knight
03-13 - Book Review
The Clone Republic by Steven L. Kent
03-12 - Book Review
The Burn Zone by James K. Decker
03-06 - Book Review
A Conspiracy of Alchemists by Liesel Schwarz
03-04 - Book Review
Blood's Pride by Evie Manieri
02-28 - Book Review
Excerpt: River of Stars by Guy Gavriel Kay
02-27 - Article
Tales of Majipoor by Robert Silverberg
02-24 - Book Review
American Elsewhere by Robert Jackson Bennett
02-20 - Book Review
Evie Manieri Guest Post
02-19 - Article
The Grim Company by Luke Scull
02-17 - Book Review
Red Planet by Robert A. Heinlein
02-11 - Book Review

New Forum Posts




About - Advertising - Contact us - RSS - For Authors & Publishers - Contribute / Submit - Privacy Policy - Community Login
Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use. The contents of this webpage are copyright © 1997-2011 sffworld.com. All Rights Reserved.