Book of Lost Things- John Connolly

Discussion in 'Fantasy / Horror' started by Mithfânion, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. Mithfânion

    Mithfânion Lord of the Wild Hunt

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    So John Connolly is a succesful suspense writer, he's done the Charlie Parker series and the "Bad Men" standalone, and suddenly he turned to Fantasy with The Book of Lost Things. My initial impression was that this was Young adult because it featured a 12-year old boy but a second look now tells me it is apparantly quite dark and definitly not for kids. Has anyone read it and could you give an idea of what it is all about?

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0743298853/ref=nosim/speculativefic051-20
     
  2. AuntiePam

    AuntiePam Cranky old broad

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    I can't add anything to the Amazon description -- that pretty much covers the plot. It's well written. I was fully engaged in the story -- never had a raised eyebrow moment. (When I raise an eyebrow, that usually means I close the book.)

    It's YA safe, if a bit dark, but interesting enough for adults. I liked it quite a lot, and will probably re-read it someday.
     
  3. Gander

    Gander New Member

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    Oooh, I love Connoly's Bird series, dark and eerie ghosty stories that make me grip the book tightly. I too thought the new one was YA; let me know what you think, if you're reading it. I saw it at the library, but there's too much on my plate right now. Alas.
     
  4. Spencer

    Spencer New Member

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    I've just finished reading The Book of Lost Things and quite enjoyed it. I really wasn't so sure after the first 60 pages and almost gave up (which would be rare for me!). However once the scene is set and David enters the fantasy world I think the book becomes a lot more interesting and there are some good twists on existing fairy tales - I loved the section portraying Snow White and the seven dwarfs :)
    Its difficult to say whether it is YA or not - the writing style initially lead me to think it was however there are pretty dark sections that I thought would be a bit too much for a YA audience.
    I'd recommend it but I wouldn't say it was a must read, hope that helps!
     
  5. DCJ

    DCJ New Member

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    Of the 75 or so books last year that I read, this one sticks with me the most. Before I read it, I had read one Connolly book -- The Black Angel which I found on a bargain book table at the local bookstore. I've since read everything that Connolly has written. I do enjoy his writing.

    I read the book last January so I can't remember many of the details but I do remember that the last chapter made the whole book worth reading. In my opinion the story was good, not great, but that last chapter haunted me for days. Love, loss, sadness, happiness, and regret -- life. For that, I consider it to be an adult fairy tale.
     
  6. intensityxx

    intensityxx Prefers to be anomalous

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    I've been reading this slowly for the past couple weeks. I have to say that it really seems to tap into primal archetypes, maybe even more so than Mythago Wood, which it reminds me of. My dreams are haunted by this book. Literally.
     
  7. KatG

    KatG The Bony Hand of Death Staff Member

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    He sort of tackles the British style in doing the fairy tale that twists on darker psychosis thing that the Brits do very well. It was sort of a deliberate construct that started out pretty well but then began to increasingly lack interest for me. While initially he seemed interested in the psychology of the boy -- and the story reinforces those themes -- it seemed to be more about making pretty images and playing with his setting, and it just got kind of static. And the protagonist, both fiery and whiny, began to grate after a bit. He does write well, I feel -- his suspense is quite good -- but in the end, it wasn't my type of thing.
     
  8. Trinuviel

    Trinuviel Registered User

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    I can definitely recommend The Book of Lost Things, it is a very beautiful and poignant novel about childhood and loss. If you want to know more about it you can read my review here.
     
  9. Wulfa_Jones

    Wulfa_Jones Gentleman and Scholar

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    It is a very enjoyable book. Much akin to Terry Gilliam's Time Bandits and to a lesser extent Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

    I highly reccomend this book - everyone I've lent it to has really enjoyed it as well. I don't normally lend books out, but I was so impressed, I wanted others to read it as well.

    I got all emotional with the ending as well!

    I 'd also suggest reading Connelly's short story collection Nocturnes as it very enjoable. He emulates the style of a few famous horror/ghost story writers from M.R. James to Stephen King. There is also a Charlie "Bird" Parker short story - my first. I then read Every Dead Thing, which while I enjoyed, I found a little dark for me! I might try reading the rest of the Parker series, but it was alla bit grim for me.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2008
  10. Mithfânion

    Mithfânion Lord of the Wild Hunt

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    I've been thinking about getting that colection but I was unsure because of the many mixed reviews. What sort of subject/characters does he tackle in that collection Wulfa? Specific stories or things that stood out for you?
     
  11. Wulfa_Jones

    Wulfa_Jones Gentleman and Scholar

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    Topic wise... quite a few of the stories relate to children, but I think that is a theme that comes from his Charlie Bird books.

    There is a novellete called the Cancer Cowboy Rides Again which is pretty good - very King like. I'll have a quick look over the book again and pick out my favourite stories.