Brass Man

Discussion in 'Fantasy / Horror' started by nealasher, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  2. Skaidon

    Skaidon New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I really enjoyed this one, been a while since I read it, but I love the character Mr. Crane!
     
  3. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Everybody loves Mr Crane, including me. This book, to a certain extent, was caused by fan feedback. In the acknowledgements I say: Thanks to those readers who told me, on reading Gridlinked, "I really liked Mr Crane!" and from whom this book got its inception.
     
  4. Skaidon

    Skaidon New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I always read the acknowledgements and remember reading that :) The other aspect of Gridlinked that I and a friend of mine loved was the Shuriken, we'd always talk about that :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2006
  5. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Czech Translation

    News from the front:

    "I'm delighted to inform you about the Polaris' offer Brass Man. This will be for an initial print run of 2,000 copies and a 4 year licence. Polaris intend to publish within 12 months."

    I like getting stuff published in Czechoslovakia ... The Skinner won the Salamander Award there and Gridlinked was shortlisted for it the following year. They're publishing The Line of Polity next, so are following through with the order of the Cormac books.
     
  6. cervantor

    cervantor Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I know this book has been around for a while, but not so in the U.S., so I just finished a review "Brass Man." Here's an excerpt:

    According to the USA edition’s jacket description, “Brass Man” is a sequel to Neal Asher’s impressive debut “Gridlinked”, which first introduced readers to ECS (Earth Central Security) agent Ian Cormac. What it fails to mention is that “Brass Man” is actually a direct sequel to “The Line Of Polity”, which is mysteriously unavailable here in the United States. For diehard Asher fans, I doubt this is much of a problem since the books have been available for a while now in the UK & Canada – in fact, they’ve already had the luxury of a fourth Ian Cormac novel – but for those of us stateside and those readers new to Mr. Asher it can be a bit confusing. So, after digging around some, I’ve determined that the available Cormac novels should be read in the following order: 1. “Gridlinked” 2. “The Line Of Polity” 3. “Brass Man” and 4. “Polity Agent.”

    You can check out the full review at www.fantasybookcritic.blogspot.com. If anyone knows the best way to get in touch with Neal and can help me out, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks in advance...

    Robert
     
  7. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the review - very nice.

    I may have mentioned it before on here somewhere, but the reason The Line of Polity isn't published by Tor US is to do with size, or so I'm told. It being my largest book at 175,000 words it apparently falls outside some upper limit that makes it difficult to sell to the book sellers.

    Robert, regarding your comments about character development. It's a tough call. At one extreme you have the all-action book with cardboard cutouts (which my books have been described as) and at the other extreme you have highly developed characters in a book in which nothing much happens (I believe this stuff is called 'literature'). I'm aiming for somewhere in the mid ground with readers coming out the other side of one of my books feeling as they would feel having just watched Terminator or some such.
     
  8. cervantor

    cervantor Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Neal:

    Thanks for checking out the review. Glad you liked it. I also appreciate you addressing the situation regarding "The Line Of Polity" and your stance on characterization. Very enlightening, though I find the reasoning behind not publishing the book here in the U.S. kind of dubious. I'm pretty sure I've read some quite lengthy novels from Tor ;) Anyways, thanks again, and I'll be in touch...

    Robert
     
  9. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, it sounds dubious to me too, but I won't get anywhere by shouting at people about it. My theory is that if I keep writing a book every nine months or so at some point I'll hit critical mass and publishers'll be trampling each other to acquire them (then I woke up and it was time to get to work).
     
  10. Hobbit

    Hobbit Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Messages:
    11,259
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    183
    It's an old topic of debate, Robert, but the splitting of books into two has caused some lively discussion round here; not only from TOR but also some of the George RR Martin books and the Tad Williams here in the UK and Peter Hamilton in the US that I can think of.

    Neal Asher does Terminator.... hmm..... think Mr Crane might have something to say on that! ;)

    Hobbit
     
  11. cervantor

    cervantor Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sometimes things are out of your control, so the best you can do is just keep doing what you do, and I think you'll get your due.

    Regarding this topic, I can understand how frustrating this is for readers and authors alike. Yet, from my experience in the music biz, looking at it from the publishers' point of view, for them, it's a business, and they have to make decisions that they feel will most benefit the company, and that does not always adhere to what the writers and readers believe is for the best...
     
  12. nealasher

    nealasher Neal Asher

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm the kind of person that tends to want to do everything e.g. I don't have an agent and have negotiated all my publishing deals myself. However, there comes a point where you have to step back and say, "You're the experts, you get on with it." Macmillan have done bloody well for me. I was dubious of the cover they did for Gridlinked. I was wrong. I left them to sell my foreign rights and they've now sold me to nine countries, which is more than some agents manage for some other well-known SF writers.

    As for Tor US, I just cannot know the market out there and what's for the best. I leave it entirely up to them. Also, the fact is that if I had the power to throw my weight around, then that would be because I sell very well, and in that case they would already have bought The Line of Polity.
     
  13. cervantor

    cervantor Registered User

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No agent huh. That leaves me even more impressed :cool: