Current Non-Genre Reading III

Discussion in 'General Fiction' started by Hobbit, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. algernoninc

    algernoninc Now I'm an axolotl

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    I'm having a good time with my first Carl Hiaasen book: Stormy Weather. A hurricane in Florida brings out the woodwork a crazy collection of crooks and lowlifes. The stoned eco warrior - Captain Skink - is my favorite by far.

    Another crazy romp I've started is also about collection of kooky characters, set in New Orleans : A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. This one won the Pulitzer, whaddaya know :p.
     
  2. Westsiyeed

    Westsiyeed The Fifth Dominion

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    Agreed - I have that one on my shelf. You usually can't go wrong with Carl Hiassen for fun and humour - Skin Tight's also very good.
     
  3. kged

    kged Gloriam Imperator

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    I've just finished "The Psychopath Test" by Jon Ronson. All too plausibly, it examines the possibility that the world we live in is run and dominated by psychopaths, and looks at how to detect them. Alternately chilling and hilarious.
     
  4. Westsiyeed

    Westsiyeed The Fifth Dominion

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    It's been a long time but I'm doing my first re-read of McMurtry's classic western Lonesome Dove. I'd have to say it's one of my favourite non-fantasy genre books; with some of the most memorable characters I've come across.

    After a week or so I'm only 1/3 of the way though this 365,000 word book; it's going to take a while though!
     
  5. algernoninc

    algernoninc Now I'm an axolotl

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    finished two great oldies:
    - Shoot the Piano Player by David Goodis - my first book by the author and a great noir. I'm re-watching Tirez sur le Pianiste by Truffaut now in order to spot the differences.
    - The Laughing Policeman by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo : the Martin Beck series is quickly becoming my favorite police procedural fix.

    Still reading A Confederacy of Dunces : a masterpiece, but I somehow don't have the urge to read more than a few pages a day
     
  6. AuntiePam

    AuntiePam Cranky old broad

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    The Sealed Letter – Emma Donoghue -- historical fiction based on a scandalous divorce case in the UK in the 1800's.

    Prisoners of Twilight – Don Robertson -- the last few days of the US Civil War.

    Cranford – Elizabeth Gaskell - life in an English village in the 1800's, spinsters and widows, getting along very well without men, thankyouverymuch. This was charming and funny. After reading it, I watched the miniseries -- very well done. I love Gaskell.

    Damsel in Distress – PG Wodehouse -- my first Wodehouse, enjoyed it very much. Went looking to see if there's been a movie and there is, but from the IMDB description, it's a very loose adaptation, with George Burns and Gracie Allen.

    Of Human Bondage – W. Somerset Maugham -- adore this book and will probably read it again. Bought the DVD but returned it. Apparently this movie hasn't been remastered -- it was unwatchable. There's a version on YouTube that's a bit better, and I might watch that.

    Sweet Water -- Christina Baker Kline -- a young woman living in NYC inherits a house and land from her grandfather, who she never knew. She uncovers a family mystery.
     
  7. kennychaffin

    kennychaffin Man of Ways and Means

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    I'm mostly reading short stories, both classic and contemporary. The lastest Pen O. Henry 2012 collection seems particularly good IMO. The standout stories for me are Kindness by Yiyuh Li and A Birth in the Woods which could be fantasy/horror http://www.amazon.com/The-Henry-Pri...7882/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336838724&sr=8-1

    Just read Tobias Wolff's A Bullet in the Brain ... could easily fall into SFF as well as mainstream: https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/ro/www/LiteratureandMedicineInitiative/20080304/bullet.pdf

    P.S. Read Of Human Bondage a while back .. a couple of years I guess, just after I got my first Ebook Reader. I Love it!
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2012
  8. DragonReader

    DragonReader Registered User

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    Currently reading Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler
     
  9. kennychaffin

    kennychaffin Man of Ways and Means

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    Am reading a number of single author short story anthologies

    Where I'm Calling From - Raymond Carver
    Our Story Begins - Tobias Wolff
    Love Life - Bobbie Ann Mason
    ...
     
  10. N. E. White

    N. E. White tmso Staff Member

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    Ah, I just finished Leatherstone by David Pabian. Excellent read.
     
  11. Mr. Aware Eagle

    Mr. Aware Eagle Registered User

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    I'm reading God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. It's excellent so far.
     
  12. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    A Morbid Taste for Bones (Brother Cadfael #1) by Ellis Peters.

    I'm having a bit of a hard time with the writing style, but I'm sort of doing okay with it. It's not bad, though, but it's a little odd for a murder mystery as the murder doesn't happen for like 100+ pages.
     
  13. Seak

    Seak and I like to party.

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    Good to hear. I love me some Vonnegut and I've had this one for a while.
     
  14. N. E. White

    N. E. White tmso Staff Member

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    The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Luis Zafon and a short of his too. (not sure if that counts as non-genre)
     
  15. DragonReader

    DragonReader Registered User

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    Now reading 4th of July, by James Patterson and Mazine Paetro
     
  16. Ochos

    Ochos Hell!

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    ive read a few Lee Child, they mostly follow the same format but boy are they entertaining. if you like those i recommend Clive Cussler as well, just pure no brain entertainment and adventure.
     
  17. Prisqua

    Prisqua New Member

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    "Fifty Shades of Grey" The Book

    I have read books before that I just could not put down. This wasn’t my case with Fifty Shades of Grey in particular. People are saying so though, and when I stopped to watch the TV the women were saying too they could not put it down, that’s why it sparked my curiosity on top of needing something to read. Well, so Fifty Shades Of Grey is not one of them, but I still would recommend it (for open minded people, of course, as the sexual reference might not be for everyone’s taste).

    Some readers say the book is “unputdownable”. However, I would not push it that far. You can read a more detailed review here
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  18. symbolhunter

    symbolhunter Science-Fantasy Zealot

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    The Night Lives On by Walteer Lord the author of A Night To Remember is an interesting update of the Titanic disaster. While not as ground-breaking as his first book on the subject it is an interesting exploration of some of the unanswered questions still remaining.
     
  19. TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Registered User

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    Currently reading Knockemstiff by Donald Ray Pollock. I got turned onto this author because of his inspiring backstory...

    ...and because of the comparisons he was drawing to Cormac McCarthy, one of my favorite authors.
     
  20. AuntiePam

    AuntiePam Cranky old broad

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    His novel Devil All the Time is also excellent. Another author in the same vein is Tom Franklin. I've read four of his books. They're all quite different but the voice is the same. Lots of empathy with characters most of us would cross the street to avoid.

    Recent good reads:

    Dark Places by Gillian Flynn. The main character is Libby Day. Libby's mother and two sisters were murdered when Libby was seven. Libby's teenage brother was convicted of the crime, largely due to Libby's testimony. When a man from a 'Kill Club' (amateurs obsessing about famous crimes and who think the brother didn't do it) approaches her and offers money to meet with the club, Libby goes along. The novel is interesting for its look at the aftermath -- Libby is quite damaged -- but the unraveling of the crime is good too.

    The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce. A 65-year-old man sets off on a 500-mile walk across England to visit a dying woman he hasn't seen for 20 years.

    Triburbia by Karl Taro Greenfield -- no plot to speak of, but an interesting look at a segment of New Yorkers -- character studies. There was no one to like but it was fascinating anyway.

    March Violets and Pale Criminal by Philip Kerr, the first two novels in his Berlin Noir trilogy, set in Berlin in the days before WWII and featuring Bernie Gunther, a former policeman, now a private investigator.

    Niceville by Carsten Stroud -- a supernatural/crime mashup that starts when a little boy disappears from a city street. He actually disappears.

    The Dog Stars by Peter Heller -- post apocalypse, dark but not as dark as The Road, and with some hope at the end.

    Hell or High Water by Joy Castro -- a young woman working on a New Orleans newspaper confronts her past. Lots of local flavor and a flinty but likable main character.

    Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn -- a man is suspected of murdering his wife. Again, unlikable main characters, but fascinating.

    Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt -- set in the 80's, it's the story of a year in the life of a teenage girl, and her relationship with her uncle, who is dying of AIDS.

    The Last Policeman by Ben Winters -- the world is coming to an end (asteroid on its way) and one man still wants to solve crimes. I liked this but am disappointed that it turned out to be the first in a trilogy.

    The Absolutist by John Boyne -- brilliant novel about a man with a secret, centered around WWI.

    One total dud: Season of the Witch by Arni Thorarinsson. Reporter in a small town in Iceland works on solving crime. Could have been interesting but I've never read worse dialogue.