I Love Editors

Discussion in 'Writing' started by hippokrene, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. hippokrene

    hippokrene Peckish

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    Is there any better feeling than looking in your inbox and finding an edited manuscript? Opening it up and watching red letters spill all over your screen like red skittles?

    I particularly like the dozens of polite ways an editor can come up with to tell you some part of your action/story/characters has failed to make sense.
     
  2. PeteMC

    PeteMC @PeteMC666

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    Is this a publisher's editor or did you hire a freelance?
     
  3. MrBF1V3

    MrBF1V3 aka. Stephen B5 Jones

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    I appreciate then an editor suggests changes which make the story better (aside from the usual "you spelled 'and' wrong") I like it even more when they can tell me a reason. Sometimes my solution to the same problem is a different one.

    B5
     
  4. Jon Sprunk

    Jon Sprunk Book of the Black Earth

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    So far *knock on particle board* I love my editors. They are insightful without being pushy.
     
  5. Hobbit

    Hobbit Administrator Staff Member

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    In these days of self-published work, I think the value of editors (and good editors to boot) is very very undervalued.

    A good editor can make a good book great.

    Mark
     
  6. Ramirez

    Ramirez Art Student

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    I wish they gave me reasons. Instead they just keep telling me "It's just not for us", which sounds like I'm getting dumped by my girlfriend or something.
     
  7. Hobbit

    Hobbit Administrator Staff Member

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    Sometimes there's just not time, considering the size of the slush piles!

    And they are in a business to sell: so 'not for us' is what is says - ie: it doesn't fit their profile in the current market.

    Mark
     
  8. WwW

    WwW Registered User

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    I'll pay a tasty muffin and three skittles to someone who can tell me where to find a reputable freelance editor. No joke.

    EDIT: For the sake of transparency, the tasty muffin now has a bite taken out of it. And the skittles were found in my left front pocket.
     
  9. PeteMC

    PeteMC @PeteMC666

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  10. robotosaur

    robotosaur Registered User

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    Full disclosure: this is my birthmother, but she's truly excellent at her job.

    Answer Girl

    She does freelance editing, manuscript clean-up, publicity, fact-checking, and other author services. She works with a couple big-name authors in the supernatural/thriller genres.
     
  11. Wurek

    Wurek Registered User

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    I love my editor for my most recent book. He was a great help and even generously gave me a good review.
     
  12. hippokrene

    hippokrene Peckish

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    I guess freelance. She's a woman I've known for a while. She started as a beta reader, but was so rigorous/timely that I began to pay her for her work on my short stories.

    But then she asked me out, which is kinda annoying. This has happened before and it always feels like their previous interest in my work or helping me improve was a ploy to get in my pants.

    Admittedly, it tends to be a successful ploy.
     
  13. PeteMC

    PeteMC @PeteMC666

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    <snort!> Brilliant :)
     
  14. Violent Emesis

    Violent Emesis Educated Beast

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    How much do freelance editors cost? On average.
     
  15. robotosaur

    robotosaur Registered User

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    Hard to say, as it depends on the size of the project, the time involved, the experience of the editor, the amount of work a manuscript ends up needing (maybe you thought it was a quick clean-up and it turns out to be a full-scale re-working)... Your best bet would be to talk to the editor(s) in whom you are interested and spell out your expectations.
     
  16. NicoleDreadful

    NicoleDreadful learning as fast as I can

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    I am aware of (and active on) critters.org for manuscript review but I know there are people out there doing professional editing. The discussion I see here and elsewhere all points to successful e/self-pub authors working with an editor, so as the number of hopeful authors grows, I expect the number of editors (and preditors, unfortunately) looking to work with them to increase as well. It seems like there must be a place to connect these two sets of people, or there should be one in the works.

    I have a vague idea to bug an author on twitter who a) has fabulously professional e-pubbed books and b) has put stars in my eyes by responding to other tweets, and ask her if her editor is taking clients, but there should be another way.

    In my dreams, there is something like Yelp, where editors are listed/list themselves, and writers who have worked with them say whether they were helpful, timely, etc. And there are little icons that show you at a glance if this editor specializes in developmental editing, or copy editing. There don't have to be skittles involves, although now they're on my mind and I want some. Mmmm... skittles... *ahem*

    How are you supposed to locate an editor, anyhoo?
     
  17. kmtolan

    kmtolan KMTolan

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    Editors - the whips...the chains.

    More.

    Please.

    Kerry (three cheers for one Judy Gill who edited my last three)
     
  18. KatG

    KatG Fulgurous Staff Member

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    Well, there are professional organizations and they usually have codes of conduct to being members of them, so that's a place to start. There's the Editorial Freelancers Association: http://www.the-efa.org/ And in Canada, there's the Editors' Association of Canada: http://www.editors.ca. Another possible source is the Literary Marketplace (LMP) which you can access at large public libraries in the reference section and which may have a freelance editorial sub-listing. It's also a good source for literary agents and publisher info, as entries have to meet certain requirements before being listed.

    Most freelancers get their business from referrals. A possible way to find them is to check out the acknowledgement page of authors you like, see who they thank for reading the ms. who is not an editor at their publishing house, if they have one, and then check whether any of those names are freelancers on the Web. A number of SFF authors have been known to also freelance edit, but I'm afraid I have no current names for you.

    They do vary considerably in price and in what services they offer. Developmental editing is where the editor helps you in developing and revisions and changes. Line editing is where the editor goes through the text line by line, and that's done when the ms. is almost finished to smooth out the prose. Copy-editing deals with typos, spelling errors, punctuation issues, awkward phrases, incorrect data, inconsistencies in the text and is the final editing stage. Proofreading is a read over of a text to find any remaining typos and spelling errors and may involve formatting for publication. We now also have electronic editors whose job is to format texts for e-book formats, checking for typos and problems for each format and each conversion stage. Most of the self-pubs who are talking about working with an editor are probably working with a developmental editor and possibly also getting line editing.
     
  19. JRMurdock

    JRMurdock Where have I been?

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    I have heard numbers from $200 to $1500. All depends on what type of editing you want done. It can also range from $1 per page up to $6 per page again depending on the editing level you want done.

    Do a YouTube search on book and beer editing and you'll see a great interview with two pro editors.


    www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yKRGX8gN6U
     
  20. Hellsfire

    Hellsfire Registered User

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    I hired my editor from the Editoral Freelance Association and I love her. Now I must say I queried about a dozen editors, some part of that association, others not. I don't think it really matters where you get your editor from as you're going to want to vet her. You should always get a sample edit to see how they work, ask plenty of questions, see how fast they respond and how friendly they are, and of course, their price.