Reading in November 2012

Discussion in 'Fantasy / Horror' started by Hobbit, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. Hobbit

    Hobbit Administrator Staff Member

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    Not to be as harsh as suciul, though I will say that now that I'm a-way into it, it is disappointing, certainly after coming after The Red Knight. It's a page turner, but the saddest thing about it is that it is undemanding. There will be some who like it, I suspect, but it'll be those who haven't read similar already (and there are many others like it.)
     
  2. Hellions

    Hellions Felis silvestris

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    I finished The Tomb by F. Paul Wilson, first in the Repairman Jack series (and apparently also second in a larger cycle of the author's called the Adversary). This was an interesting thriller/detective story falling under the urban fantasy umbrella. Repairman Jack is perhaps a bit too eccentric but he's a likeable character and so is his weird entourage. The author put the shifting points of view to very good use, fleshing out each character to three dimensional status. According to the foreword, the book's original title was the Rakoshi, not very grabbing indeed but The Tomb as a replacement doesn't make any sort of sense. Anyway, it's quite entertaining, full of suspense and Hindu legends.

    For seasonal reading, I chose Norman Partridge's Dark Harvest. It's short and sweet as trick or treatin' candy. It's horror on the literate side with some poetic touches. And it's an unexpected surprise. A Midwestern town is under the curse of the October Boy, a Jack O' Lantern scarecrow which rises each year on Halloween to confront the teenage population in a game of life and death, the whole event being supervised and endorsed by the adults. The setting was well crafted and the town's hopelessly stifling atmosphere chokes the reader as the tale unfolds. The author really played with his omniscient voice to good effect, always jumping artfully from one character to the next, pulling the strings and tying the knots to a satisfying conclusion.
     
  3. Hobbit

    Hobbit Administrator Staff Member

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    Both of those I've had recommended, Hellions, and yet I've read neither. Both not easy to get here in the UK, though I think The Tomb's been re-released. Will have to have a look. :)
     
  4. Contrarius

    Contrarius You talkin' to me??

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    Hey all --

    I've been listening to Song of Arbonne and really enjoying it. This is my first book by Kay. It has a quality that makes me what to know what happens next -- always a good thing. And the narrator is just WONDERFUL. He's a new one for me, too. As those of you who have read the book will know, there's lots of songs throughout the book. And the narrator actually sings them -- and with a nice voice, too! Dunno where he got the tunes to go with the printed lyrics, but they are pleasant to hear.

    I'm highly recommending both the book and the audio production if anyone is looking for something to read or listen to. :)

    eta --

    Oh, on the not-so-good front -- I recently listened to The Daemon Prism by Berg. I still love Berg, but the main narrator for this book (it actually uses 4 different narrators) is just AWFUL. He Enunciates Everything So Carefully And Clearly And Condescendingly, he sounds like he's reading a book to 4th graders. Just really offensive. I may have to go back and READ this one to get a true impression of it. I feel bad for Berg on this one -- the first two had perfectly reasonable people narrating, but they only got relatively minor parts in this one!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  5. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    You might enjoy 'em a bit more the second time, or if nothing else then you can just skim-read.
     
  6. azninvasion99

    azninvasion99 Registered User

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    Finished Alloy of Law by Sanderson. I really enjoyed it, had a Sherlock Holmes feel to it at certain spots. I look forward to the eventual continuation of this story.
     
  7. Seak

    Seak and I like to party.

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    Finished The Tainted City, the sequel to The Whitefire Crossing, and it was another great read. Let it be known Schafer's survived the sophomore slump. I really like this series because magic plays such an integral part to everything in the story and the world, it doesn't take a back seat at all like so many others.

    Started Red Country by Abercrombie. I actually haven't read Best Served Cold or The Heroes, so we'll see how this goes.
     
  8. algernoninc

    algernoninc Now I'm an axolotl

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    I'm about a third of the way in with Tainted City, and I like it ok, after a slow start that relied too heavily on events from the first book (and me with a terrible memory). I agree about the interesting magic system, but I found the dialogue and in general the prose less accomplishe. One reason for this may be that I read it in parallel with Anthony Ryan's Blood Song, which is probably the best debut for me since Rothfuss. The comparison is apt because there are similarities with Kingkiller Chronicles: the framing device of the older hero reminiscing about his turbulent history, the detailed description of growing up in a special school (warrior monks instead of magicians) , the special abilities of the main character, the attention to detail and the really impressive writing chops for a newcomer. I think Ryan's is better because it doesn't feel bloated with trivia, and is much more action oriented, while Rothfuss excells at being subversive of reader's expectations.
     
  9. Seak

    Seak and I like to party.

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    It did rely heavily on the first book, I had noticed that. I had similar experiences trying to read anything while I was in the middle of A Game of Thrones. It killed any taste for anything else.

    I keep hearing that Blood Song is along the lines of Rothfuss, which is really interesting especially since he independently published although now has a traditional publisher. Will definitely have to give it a go. Do you know if anything will be changed when it gets the new publish?
     
  10. Haliax

    Haliax Registered User

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    Okay. Bloodsong is officially on my radar. Seems to be getting a lot of high praise around here.
     
  11. Tim Marquitz

    Tim Marquitz Registered User

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    Finished up The Reapers Are the Angels by Alden Bell, Miserere by Theresa Frohock, and Crypto-Squad by Eric S Brown and Jason Brannon. The Reapers is a strange, but enjoyable read. The voice is odd, purposely, and it gives the book a kind of foreign movie feel. Interesting concept amidst the zombie genre. Miserere was great. It has a fairly subdued pace throughout, lots of introspection, but the characterization and writing are great, as was the sense of the world. Nothing in the book surprised me, story-wise, but I was easily able to put aside my inner editor and just read. That says a lot.

    Crypto was pretty much what fans of Brown expect: fast-paced, simple, and fairly entertaining as long as you're not expecting much from it. Probably came off worse for me than it is because of reading right after the other two books listed above.

    I've started The Emperor's Knife by Mazarkis Williams.
     
  12. DragonReader

    DragonReader Registered User

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    Reading A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin
     
  13. Westsiyeed

    Westsiyeed The Fifth Dominion

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    Finally finished The Well of Ascension by Sanderson after putting it down for quite a while - a great read and follow up to Mistborn; it was good to be back with the characters. Will start on The Hero of Ages in a month or two I think.
     
  14. Seak

    Seak and I like to party.

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    Finished up the excellent Echoes of the Past, book 4 in the Demon Squad series by the man three posts above. If you are remotely tired of urban fantasy, this is the series that will help you see there is so much more that can be done in the genre.
     
  15. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    Finished.

    Eh.
     
  16. Rob B

    Rob B \m/ BEER \m/ Staff Member

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    For far too long Daniel Abraham's The King's Blood was on Mount Toberead staring at me. I remedied that today
     
  17. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    I think about getting it, but I think I'd need to re-read the first. Do let us know how it works out.
     
  18. Slice of G

    Slice of G Registered User

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    Just finished Kill the Dead by Richard Kadrey. More of the same gore and debauchery as the first one in the series but I think I liked the first one a little bit more than this one. Kind of a different take on the whole zombie invasion storyline. I think it's getting harder and harder for authors to come up with an original zombie story. Will definitely continue with the series at some point.

    Up next is Academ's Fury by Jim Butcher, Book 2 in the Codex Alera.
     
  19. suciul

    suciul Read interesting books

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    Reading three fantasies at the moment - The Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan - this is funny and touching so far, a sort of Men of genius but with dragons instead of mad inventions - upper class girl studies dragons in a Victorian like era despite that it is not a ladylike profession; in this case rather than going in disguise, she marries a supportive dragon researcher who takes her on his field expeditions...

    Also reading The Night of the Swarm by Robert Redick and on the one hand the book moves well and I enjoy reading about Pazel, Tasha and the rest, but on the other the whole "doom time and we are the saviors' subject makes taking it seriously a bit hard

    Finally reading The Last Light of the Sun by GG Kay - it is the only historical fantasy of the author I have not yet read and I planned to for a while but now is the time; this one is what i expected - great lyrical prose and interesting characters
     
  20. JasonLee

    JasonLee New Member

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    Well, I'm just getting ready to dive into Stephen King's Under the Dome, 1000+ pages.

    I prepared for this journey by reading some fluffy, easy, light-reading Grisham.