Space Opera recommendations?

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by SpiderCrawler, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. Rob B

    Rob B \m/ BEER \m/ Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2000
    Messages:
    10,053
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet might work in this regard, though one could also lump this series into Military SF. There's a small flavor of myth in the Lost Fleet novels I found similar to Battlestar Galactica

    Also, Mark L. Van Name's Jon and Lobo novels are fun Space Opera adventure novels, the first couple of novels are available in omnibus format: Jump Gate Twist.
     
  2. Dakota

    Dakota Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thx for the moving of my post ;) and for these 2 recomendations. For the level of military/space battle thinggy, The shoal sequence of Gibson is a good example of the "amount" I would need .
     
  3. Rob B

    Rob B \m/ BEER \m/ Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2000
    Messages:
    10,053
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    173
    No problem.
    Hobbit and perhaps liviu might help as I think both of them read Gibson's novels.

    Also, Lois McMaster Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan novels are terrific and cover many bases of SF - Adventure, Space Opera, some Military SF, genetic manipulation. Regardless, the books in the series I've read are very good and many books in the series have been nominated or won genre awards.
     
  4. Hobbit

    Hobbit Now.. A Seriously Likeable Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Messages:
    11,453
    Likes Received:
    106
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Dakota!

    Have you tried the last Gary Gibson? If you liked the Shoal books, I think that Final Days you'll like.

    Neal Asher might be worth a try. Try Gridlinked.

    For Iain M Banks, try The Player of Games Less epic than many of the Culture, it's a good place to start.

    And thinking about how easy these books are to get Alastair Reynolds Blue Remembered Earth (out in the UK now, the US later in the year) is a good place to start.

    Of the older stuff: Jack Campbell Rob's suggested, Jack McDevitt I would add also. Good page turners without too much complication. John Scalzi's Old Man's War is stylistically very easy to get along with too. Not Space Opera as such (not quite the epic scale!) but a cracking read.

    Even older: Glen Cook's SF I think is great. (His Fantasy too but that's another story.) Try The Starfishers series, starting with Shadowline. The Dragon Never Sleeps is an underrated book.

    Should keep you going!

    Mark
     
  5. heretics fork

    heretics fork Curmudgeon

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    If you read DUNE and HYPERION without difficulty in understanding, can't imagine you would have too much trouble with Banks's Culture series. Banks is about the best thing going right now. I love Al Reynolds's stuff too but you should go with the later stuff rather than the REVELATION SPACE trilogy.

    For military SF I think you could do worse than to read the Starfire series from Steve White and David Weber. Very good battle scenes and an interesting universe.
     
  6. Dakota

    Dakota Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks all, I will follow carefully your suggestions :) for hyperion, as i said, I liked it but it is too hyperbolesk if i can use this word, too much unrealistic for me somehow. Lets say that I like classic ingredients in SF (some would say cheesy ingredients) and hyperion is not with classic ingredients in my perspective, even if I think the world Dan simmons created is specifically impressive and rich. For dune, the movie gave me a picture for the book so it was easier. Even if the sequels were much less interesting. I have read these books in my mother tongue language so as well it is important to know. Anyway you already gave me something to feed my appetite for SF so all good, i will a try to all what you mentioned. Seems that Im alreday hooked to the reality dysfunction after one evening :D a book I have bought after reading this forum.
     
  7. EllenS

    EllenS Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I like the League of Peoples series, by James Alan Gardner. I picked up Radiant at a book sale, and bought the rest of the series to read in the same year. The first book in the series is Expendable, and the heroine, Festina Ramos, is one of my favourite female characters in SF.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  8. Dakota

    Dakota Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi all,

    Just to give some news about my Sci-fi "restart" ! I'm totally hooked by the dawn trilogy of Peter hamilton :p I have read the reality disfunction and I'm starting the second book, the neutrinium alchemist. It is quite impressive I must admit :) Almost perfect for me :)

    thanks again for all advices !
     
  9. Hobbit

    Hobbit Now.. A Seriously Likeable Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Messages:
    11,453
    Likes Received:
    106
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Good to hear it, Dakota!

    There's lots of great stuff out there to try: enjoy!

    Mark
     
  10. Danogzilla

    Danogzilla Couch Commander

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    699
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    I'm reading Pushing Ice by Alastair Reynolds now, and I love the space stuff, and I love the ideas, but man, this dialogue is painfully bad.

    edit: I should specify, the dramatic dialogue is painfully bad, as opposed to the technical dialogue.

    double edit: I'm nearing the last quarter of the book and wow, this is pretty crazy. Fun stuff!
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  11. DennisC

    DennisC Heritage, Not Hate

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mr. Dakota. Get ready for a nice ride. Mr. Hamilton's Night's Dawn series is very, very good. =)

    I still dream about that series from time to time.
     
  12. jbcohen

    jbcohen Wildrunner

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2001
    Messages:
    713
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well the two best places to get sci-fi books are Tor and Baen. Baen is the cheaper of the two since they sell their books in bundles that average $3.50 per book. Some of the best know authors in Sci-fi books are:

    Author Best known for

    Ray Bradbury Farenheight 451
    Arthur C. Clark 2001: A Space Oddosy
    Philip Dick Blade Runner and Total Recall

    Some of the best know current authors, those that are still living include:

    Orson Scott Card Ender Series
    David Weber Honor Harringtion
     
  13. DennisC

    DennisC Heritage, Not Hate

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I second this. Tor has been a great publisher and I haven't often been disappointed by their books.

    Anything they decide to publish should be decent. And with most books having the 1st chapter online now a days its easy to see if its something you want to read or not.

    I remember reading the 1st 10 pages of Reality Dysfunction and deciding to buy it. I also remember my 1st exposure to R. R. Martin's work -- oddly enough in Dance of Dragons b/c SFBC sent it when I forgot to cancel with them. I read a mere 1 page and immediately closed the book, vowing to start at the begining. OOoh oooh oooh! And then Charles de Lint's The Little Country was a winner from page 10. =) And then Quest for the Faradawn was a winner on page 10 (granted, I was 13 when I read it).

    By contrast, reading Mercedes Lackey.... Oh man... what a horrible 30 pages. I am so glad I have made myself OK with admitting that I will never finish or read a book if it sucks. I credit the terrible film Jason X for this virtue. That film was TERRIBLE.

    If you have been reading SF for a while, you can pick out the winners in the 1st few pages. Considering, sadly, that 90% of SF is CRAP, its good to trust what folks here say and to not be afraid of closing the book on a bad read.
     
  14. DDCOrange

    DDCOrange Registered User

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2011
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Once I finish the Night's Dawn Trilogy (probably sometime next year!) I've been thinking of trying something by Ian Banks or Alistair Reynolds. Any recommendations on where to start? Of the space operas (using the widest interpretation, I know how you guys like to argue about it:)) I've read so far the ones I've liked the most were:

    The Commonwealth and Void series by Peter Hamilton (and eventually the Night's Dawn Trilogy, I'm 600 pages into The Reality Disfunction and if the rest of the ride ahead is this good I'll move the series to the head of the list!).

    The Hyperion/Endymion series by Dan Simmons

    The Gap Series by Stephen Donaldson
     
  15. Chuffalump

    Chuffalump A chuffing heffalump

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Try A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky by Vernor Vinge.

    If you like them then try a few Iain M Banks. If you like the conflict in Peter Hamilton's stuff then Consider Phlebas would be a good place to start or Use of Weapons. Or get his little book The State of the Art for a style taster.
     
  16. JustIntonation

    JustIntonation New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That delicious feeling when you realise you may have identified a new author you will really like and the even better moment when you check online and discover there's a whole back catalogue you can work your way through in the ensuing months. Bliss!
     
  17. Glelas

    Glelas Seven Mary Four

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2004
    Messages:
    572
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That would be Eric Brown for me!
     
  18. Dakota

    Dakota Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That was not even a nice ride Mr Dennis, that was a cosmic orgasm :p

    Just finished today, I read the 20 last pages of "The Naked God" on my way to work with a little tear in my eye :) Josua, Ione, Louise, Fletcher..they will stay in my dream for some nights lol !

    I strongly advise Night's dawn trilogy...Just Epic and Never boring ! A lot of characters and point of views at the beginning but easy to read finally ! A brilliant Idea, a bit of Political and Religious thoughts and not too slow paced despite the length of the 3 books ! A nice piece of Science fiction ! Maybe a quick end but how can you complain after such a read ??!

    Just went to my closer Waterstone shop and bought The Commonwealth saga (pandora's box and Judas unchained) :D For people who have read it, how do you rate it compare to Night's dawn Trilogy ? and the Void series, how do you rate it ?

    I think I will stay on Hamilton for now as he hooked me strongly :) Will tell you more about my progression ;)

    Thank you all again for the advises
     
  19. krisbslick

    krisbslick Executor

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I agree, Hamilton is one of the best at Epic Space Operas. I actually got hooked with Pandora's Star and have since moved on to read Judas, the Void trilogy, and the Night's Dawn saga. I plan on reading all his novels one day.

    I think that Night's Dawn is slightly better than the Commonwealth Saga, but if you'd ask me on a different day I might tell you the opposite. I never really wanted either to end.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2012
  20. DennisC

    DennisC Heritage, Not Hate

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mr. DDCOrange: Brace yourself, I and one other have agreed that the Reality Dysfunction is the least of the 3 books in Night's Dawn. ;-) Oh, yea, it gets better. Its true Space Opera - sprawling, at times its like a love story, others like a military novel... Its just a really wonderful read. Oh, and I have been told that Nights Dawn is the least of his works. ;-) Happy reading.

    It really is a wonderful feeling to get a new author and find that big back catalog of work to read. Jack McDevitt, R.R. Martin, and Mr. Hamilton are my current 3 who I am bouncing around between. R.R. Martin was a real shock as I was shipped book 5 by the idiots at the Science Fiction Book Club. Who the hell ships that as a featured selection?? But, at that time I figured I would try a series in the middle (never a good idea it seems). I got through 1 page of his book and closed it, vowing to get book 1. =)