The Name of the Wind

Discussion in 'Fantasy / Horror' started by Hereford Eye, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. Arkeus

    Arkeus Registered User

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    from the perspective of someoen who only read 400 or so pages in the first book, Kvothe pissed me so damn much.

    He was the exact kind of 'perfect' character that digust me, and as *everything* was about him, i gave up on too painful a read.
     
  2. Haliax

    Haliax Registered User

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    Ehn. Kvothe is not Richard, and Rothfuss is not Goodkind. I'm not going anywhere further with that point.

    Doesn't surprise me. Although Tigana was not one of my favorites of Kay either. But to the point, it just shows that the style isn't really to his liking rather than the book actually being bad.

    Again, that doesn't make it tripe. That means that it wasn't enjoyable for you. There is a huge difference. Just because I didn't enjoy Scott Bakker doesn't mean his books are bad. Just because I didn't enjoy the movie Aviator doesn't mean it is a horrible movie. They just aren't built around my taste, and despite this, I'll gladly recognize that there is obvious talent involved in their writing/ producing/etc.
     
  3. 3rdI

    3rdI Edema Ruh

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    Just to clarify something mentioned earlier...

    This story will be concluded in book three. Which at the moment is called The Doors of Stone. I don't expect the name will change. Rothfuss has made it crystal clear that KKC is a trilogy. He has no plans on revisiting the Kvothe story at any point in the future. He does plan to write in the same world again.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  4. TooNice

    TooNice Banned

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    He's also careless at times and prone to letting his temper get the best of him.
     
  5. Contrarius

    Contrarius You talkin' to me??

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    I had the same impulse as you, in large part for the same reason...but I do hate to give up on books, so I finished it. And it really wasn't a bad book, over all -- it just had a main character that the author didn't make me care much about.
     
  6. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    I think it's only fair to say that I should back out of this. I've not articulated myself as well as I should have, and some of my comments have been - I admit - unnecessarily critical or harsh. It isn't my place to criticse Rothfuss so heavily without reading his books, simply basing my arguments on recurring elements of reviews.

    Hopefully anyone hasn't found my posts too frustrating, but if they have, then I apologise.
     
  7. nuttz96

    nuttz96 Registered User

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    If you look at Kvothe's early life, it is no surprise as to why he is grown to be so arrogant. He is intelligent, naturally curious, and is gifted in all sort of talents, and due to this, he has suffered through so much hardship caused by spite and envy. He is "above" all of his peers, but is constantly restrained by others. I personally find the contrast between his arrogant youth and the mild timid old man persona to be refreshing. It adds so much more to the book, and I welcome his early arrogance knowing that it will not last.

    Argh, this worries me. How do you guys think the third book will be structured? I hope that he concludes all the flash back fairly early and then spend a lot of time in the present with Kvothe regaining his youthful vitality or what not.
     
  8. Erfael

    Erfael Lemurs!!! Staff Member

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    I suspect not. I think It'll be structured just like the previous two, all flashback framed in the present. Maybe he'll kill himself at the end, maybe he'll decide he has to get back to Kvothe, but I don't think we'll get to read that part. These books are all about the story that happened previously and, more importantly, the story that Rothfuss isn't really telling except through hints, clues, innuendo, etc....
     
  9. JustaStaffer

    JustaStaffer Registered User

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    I suspect that a second trilogy will follow detailing the "now" events.
     
  10. Erfael

    Erfael Lemurs!!! Staff Member

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    Given all he's said about it, though, I don't think Rothfuss cares all that much about the now events. And to be honest, I think he would be selling out to tell that story, no matter how much people want to read it (unless he's got something very clever up his sleeves). The story he's telling on the surface is Kvothe, but I think the story Kvote is really telling is that of the history of the world, the Chandrian, Felurian, the moon, the waystones, Fae, Lackless/lockless, stone doors, etc. And I think he'll wrap up that telling with the next book, no matter where that leaves Kvothe/Kote.
     
  11. oasis seeker

    oasis seeker Registered User

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    Hmmm, I read it when it first came out and I find it interesting that I never got that impression that Kvothe was arrogant. And he never came across as a Gary Stu or a version of an adolescent male fantasy. I'll have to re-read it soon.
     
  12. Hereford Eye

    Hereford Eye Just Another Philistine

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    Thread summary focusing on characters:
     
  13. Twinner

    Twinner Registered User

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    Nice thread summary... I guess. Why did you assemble it?
    Thanks!
     
  14. Hereford Eye

    Hereford Eye Just Another Philistine

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    Minor sidetracks in the conversation had me uncertain about what the feedback truly looked like so I pulled the actual critiques and laid them in order.
     
  15. Twinner

    Twinner Registered User

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    Ahh.. I see. I hope it helped you.
    All the best-
     
  16. KatG

    KatG The Bony Hand of Death Staff Member

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    Well, from reading the first book and then hearing some bits about the second, it seems pretty clear that Rothfuss is playing off different bits of the Merlin myth and making Kvothe Merlin-esque. Kvothe is supposed to be a legendary sorcerous figure involved with the king, ensorcelled by the Fae, conducting great feats of magic, etc. He's the mysterious figure who has a foot in multiple worlds, who is determined, with a sense of duty, but also possibly discombobulated by his power and circumstances. He's scarred and outcast but fate bends his way in his early days. So Rothfuss plays with what actually goes into a Merlin, a Gandalf, Baba Yaga, Medea, etc., while also being satiric about our notions of heroism, magic schools and so forth.

    Some of Kvothe's "arrogance" is Kvothe's smarts and natural ability, but a lot of it seems to be survival mode. He's Ruh, a nameless orphan, a street thief, competing with rich and quick wizarding kids. To survive and to make it through his training, Kvothe is compelled to go on the attack, out alpha those trying to alpha him and stare down teachers who might otherwise boot him from the school. Swagger is the defense mechanism to prevent being a further victim. In fact, Kvothe frequently thinks in those terms as strategy, which contrasts with older Kvothe who seems to accept being a victim and hiding. His swagger often hides his intent.
     
  17. s271

    s271 Repudiated Ursus

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    My bet is Kvothe will go back to Kvothe The Magnificent, but from the following books in the same world we will know that be bad for everyone.

    I think people here tend to overestimate depth of the narrative. Sure author may retcon some events/threads later, but I don't think most of dropped plotlines, inconsistencies, omissions etc is intentional.
     
  18. AmethystOrator

    AmethystOrator Registered User

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    Not in this case. Not in any way, shape or form is what you are describing attributable to these books. People could and will read these books a hundred times and not catch on to many of the meanings, nuances, foreshadowings, and details hidden here. But once you do, there can be no question that, at the least, the vast majority of them are intentional.

    Allow me illustrate one of the extremely minor examples, so as not to spoil anything of substance:

    From the middle of TNotW in regards to Denna, "The months had changed her. Where before she had been pretty, now she was lovely as well". It's a nice line, but it doesn't mean anything of significance, right? Until we get to nearly the end of WMF, and we find out that
    Denna had been braiding the word "Lovely" into her hair in Yllish knots. Kvothe hadn't been able to read Yllish knots previously, but as soon as he did, then he was able to make the connection. Then, we as the readers are able to look back and, as we try to figure Denna out, know that she must have learned this during the period where the first quote is from and her meeting with Kvothe previous. We can then infer that during Denna's absence in this time she was either in Yll, or had studied with someone who was learned in this subject. Which is itself informative, as we know from Kvothe's dialogue that there are few remaining who can write Yllish knots.

    Is this incredibly important knowledge for we readers? Probably not, but it gives us a bit more information. And again, this is only a very minor example based on a line that almost no one would have looked at and thought to have meaning. There are many, many, many much more significant examples throughout both books, and I'm sure that there are more that we won't be able to understand until Book 3.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2011
  19. teahupoo

    teahupoo Supercalifragilistic

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    YOU SIR!!! I said, you sir.... are a gentleman and a scholar. I enjoyed this post so much that i have just decided to read The Name of the Wind a 3rd time and WMF a 2nd.

    I thank you.
     
  20. Arkeus

    Arkeus Registered User

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    While being detailed is sure a good thing, it's far from rare when it comes to epic fantasy.

    I wouldn't quite say the majority of author do this, but i don't think it's a small minority either.

    I think whether you like the book or not lie on whether you like Kvothe or not. As Kvothe is not only the Protagonist, but is one in the sense a manga main character is one (as in, reality warps to have everyone's world being centered on him), *and* that it's not action-centered, this is either a deal-maker or a deal-breaker.

    Given the popularity of the books, it's pretty clear that Kvothe does somehow work for most.