The New and Improved Recommendation - Fantasy / Horror

Discussion in 'Fantasy / Horror' started by Rob B, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. Twinner

    Twinner Registered User

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    When I read that Brandon Sanderson would be writing the final books of the Wheel of Time series I decided to try some of his stuff while waiting for book 12 of the WoT and thus I found the Mistborn series. I enjoyed it a great deal and found the powers exhibited by those with powers very refreshing and different from reading yet another book about someone being born with 'the gift'. While the story works well and many elements were new and refreshing I do agree that some (not all) of the characters where not fleshed out as well as I might have liked but I found it no real deterrent to pouring through and enjoy all three of the books. Like any other series, it will not please everyone but I did enjoy it and especially enjoyed findind a series I liked that ended intelligently, satisfyingly, and did not leave me wondering when or if the author would ever finish up the series (rest the soul of Roberty Jordan and a not so gentle shove to GRRM....). Enjoy!
    Roy
     
  2. blingenfelter

    blingenfelter New Member

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    Sanderson

    I liked Mistborn quite a bit more than I liked Elantris. Sanderson isn't my favorite author, but I was certainly interested to hear that he's finishing the Wheel of Time... although after waiting years, I'm not sure I remember enough... and I'm NOT reading them all again, especially not the last two... I'll find a good summary somewhere to catch me up on the story before heading into Sanderson's conclusion(s).
    :D
     
  3. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    More of a query than a direct recommendation.
    Are there any good "Dark Fantasy" books I should really pick up? I've got A Game Of Thrones to read and I plan to pick up both Witcher novels by Andrzej Sapkowski along with the second Dragon Age novel (The Calling) by David Gaider.
     
  4. SusF

    SusF Who me?

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    I have a dark fantasy recommendation!

    Maledicte by Lane Robins

    It is a court intrique/revenge story set in a corrupt city with a corrupt government similar to, I'd say, Louis XVI. I found this book on the new shelf at the library and was very pleasantly surprised at how involving it was. The story is stand alone and ends satisfyingly.

    There is a second book which picks up one of the other characters and tells a different story set after the envents of the first book, it is Kings and Assasins. I wouldn't exactly call it a sequel. Rather a branching off.

    Yes, I'm being vague. I'm not good at reveiwing and tend to give too much up. So check out the synopsis on Amazon.com.
     
  5. Loerwyn

    Loerwyn Staff

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    Shall go for a wander to Amazon and give it a look :)
     
  6. BEEFY

    BEEFY Registered User

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    Hi posted this last time and got a lot of good responses.
    The same still applies. No aleins or sci fi and I'd like to read a complete series or book not one that has 2 books out of 3 finished lol. I'm just impatient.
     
  7. Diane

    Diane mystical muse

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    Beefy- I'd recommend trying Dave Duncan's series "A Man of His Word" The first book is the Magic Casement. I think you'll enjoy that series based on what you've liked so far
     
  8. BEEFY

    BEEFY Registered User

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    Thanks Daine. I looked it up on like and it seems to be exactily what Im looking for. If the book store has it I will pick it up today if not I will order it off of amazon.
     
  9. Raule

    Raule Registered User

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    Grr... posted in wrong thread... ignore...
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2010
  10. Mr_E

    Mr_E New Member

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    Just skipped through the thread and now have a major list of books and authors to try!

    Read a lot of fantasy when younger, then more horror, but now always on lookout for something different.

    Recent books I've read and recommend (depending on what you like)

    Nobody True by James Herbert, written from the point of view of a recent murdered guy trying to make sense of what happened.

    Discoredia by J.C Michael, picked this up at a car boots sale as only 20p and was pleasantly surprised (a bit jumbled genre wise between horror and fantasy but with a few really effective scenes.)

    Eragon. Some folks slate me for liking it but it was in a hotel library, I'd finished the books I'd taken, and for an easy beach read it did the trick
     
  11. Diane

    Diane mystical muse

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    Have you ever tried reciting the plot of Eragon to anyone? You'd be amazed at how spot on the plot is with Star Wars ....

    If you liked Eragon as a good beach read I'd recommend along similar lines the Septimus Heap series, starting with Magyk by Angie Sage
     
  12. Mr_E

    Mr_E New Member

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    Ive heard about the similarities to Star Wars but never picked up on it myself, not a massive star wars fan so thats maybe why.

    Ill take a look at magyk, thanks for the suggestion.

    Have just finished Under the Dome by Stephen King. Thought it was ok but find the themes he uses a bit repetative these days. One of the reasons I want to find something a bit different.
     
  13. SeaBeast

    SeaBeast Registered User

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    Ok, I think I'm looking for the impossible. Wondering if anyone can recommend a good Horror/Fantasy mix. I'm looking for NON-urban fantasy, no vampires, and no modern technology. I've read my fill of UF/Horror hybrids, and I'm looking for something different. I want spine-tingling horror mixed with a classical fantasy background. I don't even know if it's even possible to successfully write what I'm looking for without the world at least "resembling" our own. Any suggestions?

    EDIT: Oh, and I've read Tim Lebbon and his books centered around the world of Noreela (which were excellent). That's the closest I've come to what I'm describing
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2010
  14. Mr_E

    Mr_E New Member

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    I think a "classical" fantasy horror novel would be brilliant but find it a bit hard to get my head round how it would work. For me a big part of horror is the realism of it, or at least having the fantastic happen in a real world scenario, so having a fantasy setting wouldn't really sit right with that.

    Then again it can work with cross genre horror/sci-fi, at least with films it can, so maybe it's a cross genre that should be explored more?

    Discoredia moves between the real world and a fantasy world/other reality so that hints towards what you may be looking for but in the main its set in the real world.

    I'd be interested if anyone has any suggestions though and going to google Tim Lebbon.
     
  15. Randy M.

    Randy M. Registered User

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    I can think of some older works that might come close to what you want:

    Vathek by William Beckford. Written under the influence of the Arabian Nights, I think. Probably slow going for contemporary readers, but the ending is powerful.

    The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath by H. P. Lovecraft. Again, may be slow going for contemporary readers, and I seem to recall some moments when Lovecraft loses a bit of his control over the writing, but has some powerful moments, too.

    Zothique by Clark Ashton Smith. The stories comprising this collection are supposed to have influenced Vance's the Dying Earth works. All are set in the titular country as the sun dies and magic has re-entered the world. I enjoyed the Vance technicolor well enough, but the Smith seems to me a darker, richer hued creation. Might have trouble finding this collection, though many, if not all, of the stories have been included in other collections of Smith's work.

    The Throne of Bones by Brian MacNaughton. This is the most recent of the books listed; it was published in the '90s and won a World Fantasy Award, as I recall. Another collection of stories based in a certain time and place. The series of stories that make up the title story are especially good, but the collection as a whole works well. Again, a work based on Smith and, again, not as powerful, but good fun.

    One I'm not quite sure fits:
    Nifft the Lean by Michael Shea. The premise for these that I've read sound like they might come close to what you're looking for.

    Have you considered historical fantasy/horror? Would that be enough of a step away from what you're looking for?

    Randy M.
     
  16. SeaBeast

    SeaBeast Registered User

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    Thanks Randy M. I'll definitely look into those. Yeah, I think Historical Fantasy/Horror might be as close as you can get to what I'm describing. I really think it would be extraordinarily difficult to write a "true" classical fantasy/horror. (But if any writers are reading this and you wanna give it a shot, and you can do it successfully you are the MAN... woman... whatever)The world it would have to take place in would have to be familiar to the reader, and would have to have some well documented history. This way you could focus more on the actual horror aspects w/out having to spend so much time familiarizing the reader with the world. I could see it being done successfully in Tolkien's "Middle Earth" MAYBE. But only because we know so much already about that world through the many companion and history pieces that have been published. Maybe an Elvish horror/ghost story?

    For some reason I'm thinking Neil Gaiman is the only guy who could actually pull this off
     
  17. Randy M.

    Randy M. Registered User

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    If by 'classical' fantasy you mean Tolkein-like, about the closest you'll get is Sword & Sorcery. The Conan stories by Robert E. Howard, the Jiril of Joiry stories by C. L. Moore, the Kane stories by Karl E. Wagner, the Clark Ashton Smith, Michael Shea and the Brian MacNaughton stories I mention above all sit in or near S&S and many have elements of horror. Largely you're talking about stories from or influenced by Weird Tales magazine. You might also look into Tanith Lee's work, though I'm not familiar enough with it to offer suggestions.


    Randy M.
     
  18. SeaBeast

    SeaBeast Registered User

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    Tolkien-esque is definitely not what I was looking for, I was just giving an example of one of the only types of classical fantasy that I think would work as a horror/fantasy hybrid because of the dearth of background material written about it. But you raise some valid points

    Now that I really think about it, most fantasy has elements of horror blended in so seamlessly you don't really even notice it (grotesque monsters, ghosts/shades/spirts, brutal murders, etc). I guess it was hiding in plain sight all this time...
     
  19. Mr_E

    Mr_E New Member

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    But if the "horror" is blended in so seamlessly that you don't notice it doesn't that mean that it isn't really having the impact that horror should have?

    Shouldn't the horror elements make you want to turn away in a sort of "I don't want to read that but can't help it because I need to know what's going to happen" kind of way?

    Admittedly it doesn't fall into the classical fantasy bracket but have you tried Stephen Kings Dark Tower series? As far as cross genre works goes it seems to hit just about everything: there's horror, fantasy, sci-fi, romance, and even western elements all blended together.

    Also depends what you personally find most disturbing horror wise. The fantasy I've read has plenty of ghosts, monsters and violence but other elements of "horror", obsessive behaviour, domestic/physical/emotional/sexual abuse etc, don't seem crop up like they do in horror novels. That's more the kind of thing I find unsettling and horrific.
     
  20. SeaBeast

    SeaBeast Registered User

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    I realize I sound like I'm kind of backtracking on my above statement, but I absolutely agree with you. I'm just not sure that it can be done successfully in a true fantasy setting. I'd love for some author to prove me wrong. I think in order for something to truly "creep you out" in a way that successful horror books do, I think it would have to play on your real life fears, cultural taboos, etc. For that to happen, I think the fantasy world would have to at least resemble our own world in some sense, in order to strike those chords of fear in the reader.

    Would love to get an authors perspective on this, and whether or not they think it's possible to successfully marry classical fantasy and horror. Maybe I'll go over to Tim Lebbon's author page and pose the question. He's the only writer I've read who has come close to accomplishing this (which makes sense, considering his background in horror). Thanks Mr E for the input