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tooeviltoknow
April 2nd, 2005, 09:26 PM
I was just wondering, what would you do if someone plagiarized your work? How would you react, what would you do? If you can sue, would you sue, even if they're a friend?

Anyway, I was just wondering, boring night, ya know.

Rocket Sheep
April 2nd, 2005, 11:47 PM
Ask to have it removed from wherever it is as you threaten the plageriser with exposure as a uncreative thief and demand an apology. Or alternatively ask to have your name replaced on the work and collect all the earnings for it.

You'd need to read the copyright act where you live and find the body that governs it and then seek advice from them. They may have some standard response.

MrBF1V3
April 3rd, 2005, 12:30 AM
I'd be mad--and "you wouldn't like me when I'm mad".

I agree with Rocket Sheep, dealing with the person directly is probably your best chance to get your just due. A lawsuit would only be worth the effort if your hypothetical friend stole a successful story, and then you would have to prove the story is actually yours (hopefully this friend isn't the first one you allowed to read your story).

Since we're having a boring night; When does it become plagiarism? When somone uses your ideas, parts of your outline, your character's names, hair colors and birthdates, some of your cool descriptive phrases? (Just asking, not trying to take over your thread), and back to the original question; What would you do?

B5

Holbrook
April 3rd, 2005, 01:44 AM
Got into this on another forum recently so had the page bookmarked.

UK law.

http://copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/p01_uk_copyright_law

To quote:

1. When copyright occurs

Copyright arises whenever an individual or company creates a work:
A work is subject to copyright if it is regarded as original, and exhibits a degree of labour, skill or judgement.

Interpretation is related to the independent creation rather than the idea behind the creation. For example, your idea for a book would not itself be protected, but the actual content of a book you write would be. In other words, someone else is still entitled to write their own book around the same idea, provided they do not directly copy or adapt yours to do so.

Names, titles, short phrases and colours are not generally considered unique or substancial enough to be covered, but a creation, such as a logo, that combines these elements may be.

In short, copyright may protect a work that expresses an idea but not the idea behind it.

skwirlinator
April 3rd, 2005, 01:57 AM
I believe the person who creates the work should get credit where credit is due.
Someone who steals another's work is a theif plain and simple. So what is wrong with noting someone's work? I believe it would be an honor!

Now, If I purchase someone's work and decide to sell it I relinquish ownership of the article but the creator still owns the work. If I put my name on the work and call it my creation -that's plagiarism. Often times the works in an established artist/writers name is worth more than yours anyway.

Now a question;
If I purchase a painting at a flea market but the creators name is unknown and I display it in my nightclub as a fixture, Is that Plagiarism? What if I display it on a webpage?

MrBF1V3
April 3rd, 2005, 03:22 AM
Would "Plagiarism" apply to art, or is there another word for stealing and using someone elses artwork? Skwirlinator, I honestly don't know, hope somone else does.

Holbrook; "write a book around the same idea"--That sounds like the beginnings of a new collaborative writing thread. It might be interesting to see how many versions of the same scene we could get. (Just a random thought, I have a lot of those.)

If you want to see one of the best examples of plagiarism I've ever seen, IMHO, go to your nearest bookstore, find one of the newer translations of the Bible, and read the copyright page.

Who do these people think they are?
B5

kongming
April 3rd, 2005, 02:34 PM
It would probably only bother me slightly. I would ask that person to come clean and I would make enough people aware of what they did. And I might sue. But that's only if I wasn't busy or I was in a bad mood. Otherwise I'd just never ever let that person or publicist see my work again. I look at it this way: I have a big endless crevase of a mind I have great ideas all the time and when I have time I write some really great stories. Whoever would steal my work and pass it off as their own is a pitiable person who obviously has nothing going for them in life. Really stealing my work would hurt them far more than me.

SubZero61992
April 6th, 2005, 05:57 AM
I would be mad.
If they posted it online and began taking credit for it then I'd get extremely mad because it is impossible to convince people your innocence online because of all the E-Actors. ( boy that sounds cheezy)

Michael B
April 6th, 2005, 02:10 PM
[..] When does it become plagiarism? When somone uses your ideas, parts of your outline, your character's names, hair colors and birthdates, some of your cool descriptive phrases? (Just asking, not trying to take over your thread), and back to the original question; What would you do?

B5

Doing so is considered legitimate under certain circumstances, eg in fanzines. In fact Katherine Kurtz of Deryni fame has dedicated a magazine to publishing such stories.

If using other's ideas, etc is not OK then for example all the Arthurian legend material would be out of bounds to us. Along with countless other writers, I have written stories using characters and ideas borrowed from Mallory's Morte d'Arthur and other tales. Are we plagiarists or not?

Michael B

Holbrook
April 6th, 2005, 03:17 PM
Doing so is considered legitimate under certain circumstances, eg in fanzines. In fact Katherine Kurtz of Deryni fame has dedicated a magazine to publishing such stories.

If using other's ideas, etc is not OK then for example all the Arthurian legend material would be out of bounds to us. Along with countless other writers, I have written stories using characters and ideas borrowed from Mallory's Morte d'Arthur and other tales. Are we plagiarists or not?

Michael B

The Arthurian legend is just that a legend, which has been used by writers since the 13th century if not before. It is an idea. If you wrote a story that was nearly word for word Bernard Cornwell's version of said legend, you would be in trouble.

Also fanfic is a very dangerous ground, some authors don't mind others most certainly do. Even those that do prefer it to happen on sites/areas they are aware of and have agreed too. A lot of role play and Collab writing forums seem to miss this totally and by allowing fanfic to be placed there are running a gauntlet that one day will snap shut. It only takes one peeved writer to report a site to its host or server stating a breach of TOS and bam! The site is gone.

A site admin should be very aware with regards to the copyright of both the written word and the posting or hotlinking of art for which they do not have permission to do so.