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Gkarlives
May 29th, 2005, 04:58 PM
I don't know if there is a thread for this subject, but if there isn't, I would suggest making this one a permanent one. My question is what does the publisher mean they reserve the rights for the first anthology?

Does this pertain to placing the story in their magazine or is there something more? Basically, I am looking for information on the actual process of selling a story. What am I giving them and what I am getting in return? Will I later be able to strike a deal of my own for a collection of my short stories? It would be great to hear from people who have actually sold some stories.

JamesL
May 29th, 2005, 06:03 PM
I sold a story recently to Nocturne magazine although I have to admit I didn't actually bother to check out what rights they were paying for.

Many publishers of short fiction tend to buy the rights to your story for one year; thereafter they revert to you. :)

Expendable
May 29th, 2005, 07:22 PM
I don't know if there is a thread for this subject, but if there isn't, I would suggest making this one a permanent one. My question is what does the publisher mean they reserve the rights for the first anthology?

Some publishers will take a pick of stories they published in the last year and put out a hardback anthology. They're asking for the hardback printing rights for one anthology.

Jacquin
May 30th, 2005, 04:18 AM
The few pieces I have sold have been for "First *country* rights" which is basically the right to publish for the first time in the country in question. I would be loathe to give up any more rights than that, especially "First Anthology" rights. That effectually stops you from selling the story to anyone else on the planet unless they are going to issue a special edition containing nothing but your story (assuming of course you haven't sold exclusive rights as well). Of course it all depends on how much you want to get into print. If you are happy to relinquish your rights then go for it.

J

JRMurdock
May 30th, 2005, 02:57 PM
Once you sell a story, always read the contract. All the stories I've sold reverted back to me after 90 days. First North American Print rights were purchased. I've been resolicting all works save one (which will be in print in June). Save those contracts and refer to them regularly if you want to re-sell a work.

Then there's articles and reviews. Those works are different. Of course, read your contract(s). This will tell you what you sold and when you can re-sell the work in question.

KatG
May 30th, 2005, 05:48 PM
I don't know if there is a thread for this subject, but if there isn't, I would suggest making this one a permanent one. My question is what does the publisher mean they reserve the rights for the first anthology?

Does this pertain to placing the story in their magazine or is there something more? Basically, I am looking for information on the actual process of selling a story. What am I giving them and what I am getting in return? Will I later be able to strike a deal of my own for a collection of my short stories? It would be great to hear from people who have actually sold some stories.

When you "sell" a short story, or a novel for that matter, you aren't actually selling the story. You're selling the licensing rights for publishing the story in printed form. When you sell a story to a magazine, you are giving them the license to publish your story (which remains your property under your copyright,) for its first appearance in print. In addition to these first serial publication rights, a magazine might ask in a contract for things like second serial rights (the license to subsequent printings in other editions of the magazine,) electronic rights (to put it in the electronic version of the magazine,) or anthology rights (the license to put the story in a collection of stories that have appeared in the magazine as a magazine book publication or other printed publication.) In the case you are bringing up, you're talking about first anthology rights, which means the magazine is asking for the license either to print the story in an anthology first, or possibly something slightly different.

Being printed in the magazine's anthologies is usually in your best interests, so giving them anthology rights is not a bad thing. However, if you think you're going to want to try and place this story in other anthologies that are out there, then you may not want to tie up the rights as an exclusive first printing in an anthology. Non-exclusive anthology rights, though, would be fine. If a magazine wants to buy your story and asks for these rights, you can ask them what their deal is and state your concerns and work out any adjustments in contract language that are needed. If the magazine wants exclusive first anthology rights, i.e. the story can't appear in another anthology until they've put it in one, you'll have to decide if you're willing to do that for publication, but I would think most magazines are fairly flexible.

In any case, anthology rights are completely different from your putting out a collection of your stories and granting a magazine anthology rights does not preclude you from doing a collection of your work.

milady
June 4th, 2005, 08:06 AM
:)
Thanks for the useful thread, Gkarlives, and thanks for the useful post KatG.