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the masked poet
June 18th, 2005, 04:51 AM
Does anyone know a good site about weapons in general, like old one (swords, knives) and so on...
Thanx

Jacquin
June 18th, 2005, 05:00 AM
http://swordforum.com for all things sword related. It can be a little political but there is a wealth of information about every aspect of swords and sworsmanship.

What sort of information are you looking for specifically?

JamesL
June 18th, 2005, 05:44 AM
You might find this useful:

Weapons glossary (http://www.chronique.com/Library/Glossaries/glossary-AA/armsindx.htm)

Holbrook
June 18th, 2005, 06:43 AM
Research is good, but you need to ask yourself two questions. How much are you prepared too do and more importantly how much you NEED too do for your story.

Finding out about the weapons your character is going to use is good, but throwing in detail just for the sake of it and also putting in terms and factional information you don't quite understand can make you look silly (believe me I know :eek: )

It is, I believe, more important to convince your reader your characters know what they are doing and are comfortable with the weapons you chose rather than plunge into a wealth of detail that slows your story to a stop. Research and writing is a balancing act and it is only, I believe, with practice you learn the cut off points.

How much is enough and is it important to the story are things you must keep in mind.

I recently faced that problem in a work. I had a career Officer, the setting I am using is equal to early Victorian. Do I go into tonnes of details about his pistol, use there of, same with rifle and sabre? As I have no "battle scenes" and there are only two or three incidents in the story where the character employs the "tools of his trade" I decided that I didn't need to do more than the basic research. It was more important to the story to impress upon the reader that he was more than capable with these weapons when he choses to use them.

Jacquin
June 18th, 2005, 08:23 AM
You might find this useful:

Weapons glossary (http://www.chronique.com/Library/Glossaries/glossary-AA/armsindx.htm)

I'd very careful using some of the "facts" from that site, phrases like
heavy enough to impart crushing impact along the edge, which was rarely sharpened. The weapons works by concentrating the force of the blow, the knight and the mass of the horse into the thin edge, often left to a thickness of between 1/16" - 1/8". The thickness at the center was between 3/16" and 1/4", and the blade generally started out from between 2-3" wide at the base and tapered gently to a point
are simply not true.

J

Holbrook
June 18th, 2005, 08:32 AM
Best to cross reference, or at least have a couple of sources. To be truthful, books are far better than websites. Websites can get you started. Indepth you have to plunge into books, besides books are nice to have ;)

Expendable
June 18th, 2005, 08:47 AM
Here's a site on medieval swords - http://www.vikingsword.com/

A site that touches the design and actual use of swords -
http://www.thehaca.com/

The Typology of Medieval Swords - http://www.historicalweapons.com/swordstypology.html

Fencing - http://www.fencing.net/

Elizabethian Fencing - http://www.musketeer.org/

Short Biographies of Elizabethian Fencing Masters - http://library.thinkquest.org/15340/bios.html

The Japanese Sword Arts FAQ - http://www.kjartan.org/swordfaq/

British Swords - http://www.militaryheritage.com/swords2.htm

Of course, it helps to know what it is you're looking for in such a broad subject.....

Jacquin
June 18th, 2005, 09:21 AM
A site that touches the design and actual use of swords -
http://www.thehaca.com/The style of combat that this association teaches is one of the most hotly debated topics in Western Martial Arts. Is it authentic? Is it simply a mix of the simplest techniques of lots of different styles? I'm not going to judge but it is worth bearing in mind that they are nor purist in any way. Also the url changed a few years ago. They are http://thearma.org now. Some of the ost dedicated scholars in the world are to be found at http://hemac.org


The Typology of Medieval Swords - http://www.historicalweapons.com/swordstypology.htmlNot going to argue with this, Bjorn and Peter are both extremely well schooled and Peter is regarded as one of the best swordsmiths in the world today, however this is Ewart Oakeshotte's typology.


Fencing - http://www.fencing.net/Modern fencing is almost completely unrelated to medieval combat. There are one or two similarities between epee and rennaisance rapier work but in general I'd stay away from anything this modern.


Elizabethian Fencing - http://www.musketeer.org/This is an SCA society, their version of combat may look historical but it is hugely altered by the modern safety rules of the SCA. It is not Elizabethan Fencing.


Short Biographies of Elizabethian Fencing Masters - http://library.thinkquest.org/15340/bios.htmlBadly researched nonsense trotted out as historical fact. This is simply a repetition of the myths started by people like Castle, Hutton and Burton.


The Japanese Sword Arts FAQ - http://www.kjartan.org/swordfaq/ Very few schools actually practice traditional sword arts, some iaijutsu schools are worth looking into and any official Bujinkan school will I guarantee be excellent.


British Swords - http://www.militaryheritage.com/swords2.htmLots of nice pictures of relatively modern military swords.

I know this makes me sound very picky but the study (and collection) of swords has been a passion of mine for almost all of my adult life. There are a huge number of myths floating around about western swords and swordsmanship and unfortunately most people don't research, they just copy the first thing they have seen and expect that it is true.

J (on a mission)

Holbrook
June 18th, 2005, 09:36 AM
Not going to argue with this, Bjorn and Peter are both extremely well schooled and Peter is regarded as one of the best swordsmiths in the world today, however this is Ewart Oakeshotte's typology.

True and though it is not perfect it is a good base to use, because most folks who have studied WMA will have a general idea of what you are on about if you say an Oakeshott XIIa ;)

And Peter is good...very good....


I know this makes me sound very picky but the study (and collection) of swords has been a passion of mine for almost all of my adult life. There are a huge number of myths floating around about western swords and swordsmanship and unfortunately most people don't research, they just copy the first thing they have seen and expect that it is true.

J (on a mission)

Why do you think I don't argue with him on this subject ;) :eek:

Expendable
June 18th, 2005, 10:51 AM
I was only trying to help

--ex.