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SubZero61992
July 31st, 2005, 08:55 PM
I know I know, another pointless reality thread by Zero. :(

Any ways, I have these big guys in my story, when I say big I mean heavy weapons, large frame, and pulsing muscles soldiers who in my sketches carry mini guns like a chainsaw. I know you will say its my story do whatever I want but I want to know the reality of mini guns being used by people. I heard in the movie Predator the mini gun guy had to wear armor to protect him from the guns violent shells, I figured a way around that but the idea of someone actually shooting the gun and staying on their feet is bugging my mind.

What do you think about mini guns? Do you think that maybe some day we will find a way to make them hand held destructive guns?

Chris G.
August 1st, 2005, 12:51 AM
In the movie Aliens, some of the Marines had a heavy chain gun like weapon that was mounted on their torsos connected to an arm like they use for motion picture steady cams. The gun's seem to have no weight because their weight is distributed along the arm to the torso mount and thus the gun seems to "float" like the cameras do for motion pictures and most of the cameramen I've seen using them are definitely NOT "muscle guys." I also believe a full sized motion picture camera is a hell of a lot heavier than a mini-gun.

Ouroboros
August 1st, 2005, 03:58 AM
Mini-guns were designed to be used mounted in or on light aircraft or helicopters. For a number of reasons, some of which I will touch on, these are probably the only places they are really suited to. The desing's primary advantage is its high-rate of fire, but this is is mediated by its dependency of the barrel assembly being electrically driven, and a high rate of ammunition consumption.

An attempt was made to create a portable version, but there were (are?) problems: Firstly, the weight of the thing. Say, thirty to forty pounds for the weapon itself, and then another thirty five or so for the 1000 rounds of ammunition the soldier would need to carry in order to even begin to justify bothering with the design. Then there's the issue of how the mini-gun would be powered- the portable batteries and assembly needed to drive it would also cost more weight, say another twenty to twenty five pounds each.

In case you haven't realised, this is far too heavy for one soldier, no matter how big, considering all the other gear that one has to carry before he adds his primary weapon on top. We value mobility and flexibility too much to saddle someone down with that much weight.

Suppose you did set yourself up, somehow, with this kind of rig, though. How would it shoot? Probably lousy. At a continuous rate of fire, the recoil would make it uncontrollable for one man unsupported. Which kind of negates the whole purpose of the design, if you can't capitalise on the high rate of fire.

James Barclay
August 1st, 2005, 04:04 AM
Plenty of artistic licence in gun toting films all round. Any of us who've shot a shotgun at clay pigeons understands recoil. You need muscle to control even the smallest projectile weapon.

Unless it was truly recoiless (and that would need some amazing distribution technology) a mini gun could not be fired from the hip like we have seen from Hollywood. And a gatling gun always was a tripod mounted weapon fired using a crank to wind the barrels round to hte firing position (a fine wild west weapon).

The images we are given of people flying through the air shooting people with an Uzi in each hand are ludicrous. Most guns are very innacurate, even when aim is taken, from any distance worth the name. Firing even a pistol accurately requires two hands, a brace position and training. As for an AK-47, best if you're kneeling down, or better still, lying down. On the run? Well, good luck.

Wish I could remember the name of it but there was a film about Boot Hill where the guns were portrayed as they would have been. Wildly inaccurate. You could stand ten yards apart, empty your bullets at your enemy and when the smoke cleared, you'd all still be fine. People got killed from very close range or hit because the density of lead in the air made it inevitable.

NOM

pcarney
August 1st, 2005, 08:08 AM
If you're really intent on using these, I suggest having them mounted on some sort of exoskeleton, which could carry the weight and help with the recoil (although I'd imagine they would still need to be anchored, unless the exoskeleton weighed enough).
This is already in the works, actually-
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1112411.stm

SubZero61992
August 1st, 2005, 12:01 PM
My idea was the mini gun being attached to a metel arm that when over the users shoulder and attached to a plate on the users back to help support the gun, kind of like an exoskeleton.

TheEarCollector
August 1st, 2005, 12:21 PM
In the near future a minigun on an infantry COULD be possible. The US Army is currently working on an exoskeleton as part of the "future warfighter" (or something like that program)... I think the last I heard wast that the exoskeleton will be out in 2015, and the entire setup (including a helmet that displays a HUD, amiplifies low sound but prevents loud sounds from deafening you, camouflage that uses nanotechnology to adapt camouflage to your envirnment, fluid body armor that hardens upon the impace of a bullet, etc) should be out around 2025.

I think Popular Mechanics mentioned it a month or two back... Otherwise just look into landwarrior and the soldier of the future.

SubZero61992
August 1st, 2005, 12:21 PM
I just thought of ResidentEvil 2 the movie. The nemises uses a real mini gun and in the making they person who played Nemises could use the mini gun, so how does he do that I wonder? He is a pretty big guy.

TheEarCollector
August 1st, 2005, 12:25 PM
Can you LIFT a minigun? Of course...

But lifting an 8 pound rifle gets hard after a while. The thing you have to remember about soldiers is that we don't fight for thirty minutes and go home... we have to carry all that stuff with us TO the fight, then we have to carry it WHILE we fight, then we have to carry it home.

Try this experiment at home (a form of torture the military puts recruits through, because it messes with your head... ok it's not really torture but you get the idea).

Fill a canteen (or a mug) with water. Now hold it straight out.
Can you do it? Good.
Now just keep it out there for five minutes and see how heavy that little glass gets.

Expendable
August 1st, 2005, 03:49 PM
I know I know, another pointless reality thread by Zero. :(
Asking questions isn't pointless. This forum exists to answer questions. What would be pointless is if you didn't ask.


Any ways, I have these big guys in my story, when I say big I mean heavy weapons, large frame, and pulsing muscles soldiers who in my sketches carry mini guns like a chainsaw. I know you will say its my story do whatever I want but I want to know the reality of mini guns being used by people. I heard in the movie Predator the mini gun guy had to wear armor to protect him from the guns violent shells, I figured a way around that but the idea of someone actually shooting the gun and staying on their feet is bugging my mind.

What do you think about mini guns? Do you think that maybe some day we will find a way to make them hand held destructive guns?

Mounting one to an exoskeleton so the guy inside can move around easily as if he was walking in the park would do it for a normal person. But what effect does a minigun have on your big strong guys?