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Hereford Eye
August 14th, 2005, 10:36 AM
Whoo hoo! Check out this article and you will never ever be stuck for a story again.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/09/06/1031115933686.html?oneclick=true
Of course, if we all keep using the same plot lines we are going to become cliches pretty fast. :D :p

choppy
August 14th, 2005, 01:30 PM
I think you have to have a subscription to see the article. And even though it's free, too many people out there already have my email address.

Hereford Eye
August 14th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Ah, but I got to there from here.
http://www.emmadavies.net/blog/seven-twenty-thirty-six-plots.aspx.
Should have checked the workings of the link after I posted but it never occurred to me it might be protected.

butterfly
August 14th, 2005, 03:46 PM
Sheesh back to being put into a certain number/letter/category. :rolleyes:
Can't you just write anymore??

MrBF1V3
August 15th, 2005, 12:59 AM
I've researched the plots before, but I don't consult those notes when I'm writing. (I usually start a story with the setting or the characters, the plot grows from those.) I have gone back a few times to see where what I've written would fit. The fun part is to try to combine two or more of those established plots(easier), or to construct one which hasn't been classified yet(harder). --Dealing with the unknown while attempting to save the life of a kinsman.--

We always have clones, but we should try to have original clones.

B5

Hereford Eye
August 15th, 2005, 09:02 AM
IMO, they are so broad as to be meaningless, much like determining what your top ten favorite authors. For me, that sort of question always must be answered: "you mean today?" For example, I might consider Ender's Game a "man versus nature" plot while others might see it as "man versus man" and still others could weigh in on the side of "man versus machine." As far as I can tell, we'd all be correct.

JRMurdock
August 16th, 2005, 01:45 PM
I think we've brought it up before, but if you're lacking for ideas (something I've not had trouble with) get out a pen and paper and brainstorm for 5 minutes and see what happens. Just write as fast as you can all your random thoughts. It's rare that nothing will drop out.

But I agree, these are very vanilla ideas. They've no spice at all. That's what makes the story.

Holbrook
August 16th, 2005, 01:45 PM
Some people find this sort of stuff useful.

I personally find it destructive.

Deep down I want to create the story I have rumbling in my head, to let the idea out and get it down and then it can start to grow and evolve. Same with my characters.

I quietly plot and plan, altering and re-writing until I have ther story I feel best reflects the story or idea I had in my head to begin with. If I start looking at this sort of thing all the ideas die or become twisted, because I begin to lose my idea in the fog of what others believe should be my idea.....

Hereford Eye
August 16th, 2005, 02:19 PM
Nah! It's more like the judges at the figure skating sorting and categorizing after the fact. "Oh, the Monster? Man versus nature, no doubt about it! OTOH, I can see where you could see it as man versus man or even man versus supernatural." Let's see, the Russian gives it 7 our 9 on man versus man, the Frenchwoman gives 8 out of 10 on man versus the supernatural and the conservative Britisher gives it 10 out of 10 on the man versus machine scale. Those Brits, you know! ;)

johnkarr
August 17th, 2005, 08:37 AM
Some people find this sort of stuff useful.

I personally find it destructive.

Deep down I want to create the story I have rumbling in my head, to let the idea out and get it down and then it can start to grow and evolve. Same with my characters.

I quietly plot and plan, altering and re-writing until I have ther story I feel best reflects the story or idea I had in my head to begin with. If I start looking at this sort of thing all the ideas die or become twisted, because I begin to lose my idea in the fog of what others believe should be my idea.....


I heartily agree. Fine to get some general knowledge out of plot examination, but when it comes to actually writing the story, intuition is a better guide from my experience.