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meepmeep
September 11th, 2005, 06:41 AM
When if ever is it appropriate in a novel to have the confidant become the love interest?
Are there any genres in which this is a faux pas?

Dawnstorm
September 11th, 2005, 12:20 PM
Nothing wrong with it whatsoever.

Just remember to give the character a life of his/her own, so that the change in function is just that; a change in function. There are two things I don't like:

(1) Characters whose personality appears to change in order to make another character look his/her part, and (2) rules that say you can't do this or that (heck, you could even degrade the protagonist to love interest once someone more interesting comes along :D ).

MrBF1V3
September 11th, 2005, 04:51 PM
...I don't know, could this ever happen in real life.


I mean... really. :)

B5

Dawnstorm
September 11th, 2005, 05:06 PM
Is there anything (physically possible) that could happen but doesn't - in real life? Stranger things have happened. Things that make no sense at all happen. If real life was a novel nobody would believe it.

KatG
September 11th, 2005, 06:27 PM
When if ever is it appropriate in a novel to have the confidant become the love interest?
Are there any genres in which this is a faux pas?


Wait, wait, I get to tell you what to do? Oh goody. Well you can have the confidante become the love interest, but only, and I mean only, if she or he is a brunette. If the confidante is a blonde, then no way. And by that I mean a natural blonde. If it's a dye job, then the confidante can be the love interest. But if the confidante is a red-head, then he or she can become the love interest but they have to later betray the protagonist in some way. And somewhere in the story, you have to put both a tortoise and a camel. The protagonist doesn't have to eat the tortoise or ride the camel, but the animals must be present in addition to any other animals you might have in the story. Oh and did I mention the kitchen fire? Every fantasy story has to have a kitchen fire, though it can be a small one. In sf stories, kitchen fires are verboten, but you have to have at least one robotic device.

Sorry, meep, I couldn't resist. :) Do whatever you fudging like in the story. Please. I'm begging. I promise not to rat you out to the story police. Unless I dye my hair red, in which case you are out of luck.

TheEarCollector
September 11th, 2005, 10:30 PM
The real question is does the character fall in love with the confidant in the story, or are you trying to force it because you feel that you need a love interest?
If yours applies to the first question, you are good to go, if it applies to the latter go in knowing that forcage is always wrong when writing.

Holbrook
September 12th, 2005, 02:25 AM
KatG, though art evil! ;)

Meepmeep; I think you are worrying over nothing. A confidante is normally a friend. Friendship can take many forms and can go as deep as you wish it too. How it reflects on your story and if it causes any conflict is up to you. Please don't get bogged down in over thinking each piece. I know that's had to do, but sometimes you have to sit back and just write what feels right for your story.

meepmeep
September 12th, 2005, 02:51 AM
Okay, stupid question. The reason I asked it is that I'm currently working on a conspiracy thriller :rolleyes: I've got a drawer full of false starts and I tend to peter out when I don't know where I'm going. The plot is fairly intricate and as a result of clever manouevring by the opposition the protagonist loses everything and becomes a fugitive. I haven't read enough conspiracy thrillers (please suggest titles) to know whether a love interest is going to become a lead balloon to the story development. But from most of my forays into noir, girlfriends and confidantes are most effective if they turn bad at some point in the story.

Expendable
September 12th, 2005, 03:00 AM
Maybe the confident has had a secret crush on the other and during the story, might finally reveal how they feel, forming something stronger than mere friendship.

But Katg's right, you gotta be careful. If she's raven-haired, she's likely to be very jealous. If she catches you playing around, say goodbye to protruding parts.

Expendable
September 12th, 2005, 03:07 AM
...But from most of my forays into noir, girlfriends and confidantes are most effective if they turn bad at some point in the story.
You could go the femme fatale route - bad girl out to seduce the hero and the girlfriend/confidante feeling betrayed by the hero's falling for the bad girl.

Have fun with it.