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xghostsniperx
September 25th, 2005, 10:57 AM
I used to be pretty hardcore a couple years ago--I'd say up all night playing Counterstrike or some RPG. I hardly ever play anymore, though, now that I sort of "discovered" that reading is actually better than playing games.

Monty Mike
September 25th, 2005, 11:03 AM
I'd say I now read and game equally as much. If you are interested in reviving some old roots then please be sure to come by the Game forum (http://www.sffworld.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=11) where we can discuss any games you enjoy. There's also the site's Game section (http://www.sffworld.com/gindex.html) in which we try and keep our users updated with recent news and reviews.

Also, if you feel we could do anything to improve these areas of the site please let us know here (http://www.sffworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11510).

cheese
September 25th, 2005, 11:49 AM
I guess im a "gamer". Two nights ago I played warcraft frozen throne from 6pm to 4:30 am. I would of played longer but our internet connection was cut off because I was online too long (It was my first time my parents allowed me to play warcraft in a year). :D

Miriamele
September 25th, 2005, 10:17 PM
I think that really most computer games are a waste of time compared to reading books...yet I am somewhat ashamed to admit that I usually spend much more time on the computer than I do reading. (And don't even ask me if I've worked on the book I'm supposed to be writing lately.) Right now I'm hooked on Ragnarok Online, an anime-style RPG...it's completely addictive (to me anyway). Back last winter I was really into Ultima Online, but I got tired of it because the battle system was so crappy.

I find that after spending a busy day taking care of two little kids, once the evening arrives my mind is too frazzled to concentrate on a book. So even if it's a waste of time, I go kill some monsters instead. :cool:

You are right though Ghostsniper, reading is definitely a more rewarding experience than playing games, I truly wish I had more energy to read these days. :)

JamesL
September 26th, 2005, 03:25 AM
I am a bit of a gamer, I have to admit. My latest vice is Guildwars - one evening not so long ago I played 8 hours straight. Sadly this is not the first time I've done that either; I've had all-night sessions on Champ Manager and Baldur's Gate 2, as well as a number of others.

The trouble for me is that gaming is almost part of my blood; I've gamed since I was 5. While I enjoy reading and writing, gaming is just easier, it requires less effort. This is why I end up gaming instead of writing. :(

Tarn
September 26th, 2005, 04:50 AM
I think that really most computer games are a waste of time compared to reading books...

I agree, for the most part. While there are many games that can be fun and entertaining, the number that actually have an impact on you and linger in your mind for days, weeks afters like a good book are minimal.

If you're interested in games that have decent stories and aim to do something more sophisticated, I'd recommend checking out the following:

Mafia (quite old now - similar to GTA gameplay, except wrapped around a superb gangster story)

Morrowind (hugely in depth RPG, but what makes it notable is the depth to the world, which at times can feel as detailed as the best fantasy novels)

Half Life 2 (on the surface a fairly standard first person shooter, but underneath a beautifully detailed game that tells a story in a manner unique to games)

Beyond Good & Evil (fun cartoony stuff, but told with real style and charm)

And if you want to go really old school, you could do worse than check out Deus Ex, a game that rather kick-started trying to do interesting, more complex things with game narrative. It's ugly as sin, and the story is very X Files derivative at times, but at other points it's about as good as it gets.

I think I'd probably describe all of the above as games for people that don't necessarily like games. Although gamers will love them too. :)

kater
September 26th, 2005, 08:08 AM
Really old school is Deus Ex? Your making me feel old man :D I'd suggest though that you've forgotten a whole strand of games such as Monkey Island, Day of the Tentacle, Sam and Max, Grim Fandango, Broken Sword etc Also even the more recent consoles have had some awesome stories, I was utterly enthralled the first time I played MGS on the PS1. MMORPG's are also massive, ask Miri :D and the ability to continually build a character within different environments is huge. I think that sometimes people just want to play games and there are genres that just don't support storytelling or don't need it. Mace Griffin is one of the most recent games I cracked, thought it was fantastic (took me back to N64 Goldeneye a bit) but after the first few levels I paid zero attention to the storyline. So for me it really has to be an inherent part of the title, GTA or MGS have been recent prime examples where the two aspects complement each other, but there's nothing worse than having to sit through too many long cut scenes that add nothing to the nuts and bolts of the game. It's a tough balance.

I think also that gaming is possibly one step in wanting to write your own books, with gaming you get to interact with the storyline, make choices and create your own path with the tools you've been given. Sure the storyline isn't yours but there is a degree of freedom with gaming that there isn't with the passive-recipient forms of Film, TV and books. I'm quite surprised people find reading a book harder than gaming though, I just sit on my bed and open up a book :D Picking a game, trying to remember where I was and what I need to do are definitely more challenging for me - I have three games currently all on the last level or two that I can't face going back to yet :o

Tarn
September 26th, 2005, 08:39 AM
Heh, Deus Ex only appears old school because gaming tech has advanced so much in recent years. :) You can't beat the likes of Monkey Island, though...still a classic and still great fun to play. To my shame I've never played Sam & Max, Grim Fandango or Day of the Tentacle, however - I must track them down sometime soon.

GTA I'm unsure about - absolutely incredible gameplay, don't get me wrong, and one of the finest arcade games ever created. I was particularly excited about GTA:SA, as the story was very interesting throughout the first city and the countryside. However, once it expanded to the second city it become notably less interesting, as the 'reluctant gangster' angle of you being sucked back in against your will suddenly evaporated, and the next thing you knew you were burying people alive in concrete. Fine, it was also highly amusing in the sick GTA style humour, but I would have preferred to choose to not go down the ultra-violent route - I found it hard to play a character that I couldn't sympathise or associate with at all.

Doesn't stop the game being damn good fun, though. :)

Zanzibar
September 26th, 2005, 08:40 AM
Grim Fandango? Now I feel old :). I played that game many years ago, but I'll agree that is was superb, and very original from a stylistic standpoint.

It seems that whenever a discussion about the depth of games arises, no matter the venue, people always take to listing off their favorites from five years ago, or earlier. It's always harder to comment on current games because to get to them we have to wade through a sea of bad titles and clones. I'll second Tarn's nomination of Beyond Good and Evil, however. Although it's a platform-style game, it has wonderful heart and is equally fun.

Anywho, the market's in the crapper. All we "Oooh" and "Aaah" about now is graphics and computer A.I. and whether or not the mirrors in the bathrooms of these games show accurate reflections. Where's the story? Games whose stories are the first priority are becoming rarer and rarer, and when they are made they don't often stack up performance-wise to the big shooters and such.

Take the Myst series. I love these games, but nowadays so many people would rather pull the trigger on a spectacularly modelled rocket launcher and blast Satan's best buddies to Kingdom Come. It seems the current market just doesn't have the patience for simple point and click thinkers, mostly because people have taken to dragging their mouse cursor across the screen until it changes, revealing the next step. Blah.

I miss the nineties.

Monty Mike
September 26th, 2005, 09:22 AM
Right now I'm hooked on Ragnarok Online, an anime-style RPG...it's completely addictive (to me anyway).
I've heard so much about that game yet still haven't played it (or even seen any screenshots for that matter) :o

Is it true that one can download it and it's completely free?


You are right though Ghostsniper, reading is definitely a more rewarding experience than playing games, I truly wish I had more energy to read these days. :)
I'm almost tempted to disagree with you when it comes to Final Fantasy game. To me they feel like I'm 'playing' a book - best games out there IMO ;)


Anywho, the market's in the crapper. All we "Oooh" and "Aaah" about now is graphics and computer A.I. and whether or not the mirrors in the bathrooms of these games show accurate reflections. Where's the story? Games whose stories are the first priority are becoming rarer and rarer, and when they are made they don't often stack up performance-wise to the big shooters and such.
That's where RPGs and Final Fantasy games save the industry ;)

In the past I used to have the urge to play racing, sport, action, or shooting games (generally the more aggressive kind) but now I find that I can survive solely on FFs :D The stories just captivate me from start till end - like reading ana amzing book, only your in it! :p

Don't get me wrong, I still love seeing good graphics :)