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pcarney
November 9th, 2005, 09:01 AM
When youíre writing a second draft, is there a particular aspect of the writing you find needing the most help? For example, Iím still on the first draft of my current WIP, but I know its missing the Ďsense of dreadí the story really needs. I also know Iím not giving enough description in some areas, too much in others. Either way, Iím getting to the end of this first draft, and I refuse to go and re-write anything yet (something Iíve done for years, its an ugly cycle).

JamesL
November 9th, 2005, 10:43 AM
It's usually my descriptive writing that gets altered in the 2nd draft I think. The dialogue never seems to change an awful lot.

It's a good thing to finish the first draft before you start editing. I used to edit as I went and it became a nightmare as I regularly found myself staring at the same sentence for hours on end. :eek:

pcarney
November 9th, 2005, 11:49 AM
It's a good thing to finish the first draft before you start editing. I used to edit as I went and it became a nightmare as I regularly found myself staring at the same sentence for hours on end. :eek:
It's only taken me 10 years of (half-assed) writing to make me realize that!

kater
November 9th, 2005, 05:01 PM
I've clocked up five doing the same thing :D I think second draft for me is trying to make everything fit - do the characters interact what I consider to be accurately, do I have any cheesey lines, do the relationships work, does the pacing complement the narrative. I try and make it cohesive so that if I were to read it as a story I wouldn't be shaking my head to how dumb the whole set-up is.

BLACK HAMMER
November 9th, 2005, 08:57 PM
It sounds to me you may need to start all over with the first draft. Take a brake from writing and ACT it out... Just don't kill anyone.

Holbrook
November 10th, 2005, 01:48 AM
The way I work;

Draft out a rough outline.

Write first scene.

Re-read it.

Correct any major errors.

Update outline (due to ideas formed by the writing of first scene)

Write second scene.

Re-read it

Correct major errors.

Re-read first scene and correct or alter anything that might not dove tail into second scene.(often no, but it keeps my mind on the story/plot)

Update outline.

Continue in same process until I have a block of scenes that fit well together in one time period/setting in my story, or up to the place where I have a natural pause in my tale. Set that aside.

Update outline.

Continue with scenes in the same manner.

Once story is complete I consider that my first draft.

Now the hard work begins.

Read the whole thing. Make notes on what needs to be improved or altered with regards to the progression of the story.

Do alterations.

Read the whole thing again. Make notes with regards to continuity. That is everything for the eye colour of characters to the political system of my world.

Read the whole thing again. Correct errors in spelling, grammar, tense etc.

Read the whole thing again and with the aid of a third person do a nit-pick edit on all of the above. (another set of eyes, of some one willing to help, is a godsend and a prize to value.)

Then write synopsis.

Prepare letters to agents/publishers.

Send it out.

Once rejections start coming back do another read through and think on a new set of edits with regards to plot structure.

Oh this is all after a prolonged period of research into various aspects I want to put into the book. (use of weapons, dress of the type I am using, carriage construction, political systems, the cotton industry. Siege warfare etc.. etc...)This research continues during the writing.

James Barclay
November 10th, 2005, 03:21 AM
I feel it's critical to finish your first draft before starting rewrites. Of course, edit the scene you've just written, but don't go back and start making major revisions (should you need to). Endless tinkering means you'll never actually finish your work. And there's something amazingly satisfying about writing 'The End'. It gives belief that you can complete and the energy to go back and improve.

I find when I'm revising that there are multiple areas that need attention. Dialogue, action, plot-tightening. For me, it's about giving the book the pace I want, where I want it and that means pretty much everything is up for grabs...

NOM

JRMurdock
November 10th, 2005, 10:56 AM
The biggest thing to remember is this 'It's called a first draft for a reason'.

Both Stephen King (in On Writing) and Mike Stackpole (in his podcast the secrets) same something very similar: Get the story out first.

Your first draft is allowed to suck and be filled with plot holes and have poor descriptions. This is your chance to get the story out of your head and onto paper. If you take that mentality you'll find that words will flow onto paper faster than you ever thought possible. You need to disconnect your internal editor and just write. This is the intent of NaNoWriMo. To help you learn how to turn off the internal editor and just get the words out.

For me, the second draft is when I need to edit and clean up what I've done. Give names to objects, cities, countries, festivals, etc. Flesh out the world. Expand details and dress my characters in appropriate clothes. The first draft is pure story.

Jadewtch
November 10th, 2005, 01:09 PM
Draft out a rough outline.

Write first scene.

Re-read it.

Correct any major errors.

Update outline (due to ideas formed by the writing of first scene)

Write second scene.


My style of writing has become very similar to this. I've found that I can't continue the story if I know there's a plot hole large enough to drive a truck through. It doesn't matter that it's only the first draft.... My husband tells me I stress too much. :rolleyes: