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Holbrook
January 1st, 2006, 04:41 AM
Take a look here.......


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-1965623,00.html

Dawnstorm
January 1st, 2006, 06:07 AM
Lol...

The article seems to assume editors (or agents) can't spot talent. It doesn't occur to them that Naipaul could be overrated. :p

Does it really surprise anyone that your novels get a quality upgrade by known-name-status and prize-tags?

Mathain
January 1st, 2006, 06:21 AM
Lol...
It doesn't occur to them that Naipaul could be overrated. :p


Oh, goodness. I think Naipaul is an amazing writer, at least among the best of the last decade.

VSN said:


“With all the other forms of entertainment today there are very few people around who would understand what a good paragraph is.”

I'm so afraid that I agree with him....

Dawnstorm
January 1st, 2006, 10:38 AM
Oh, goodness. I think Naipaul is an amazing writer, at least among the best of the last decade.

He probably is. I'll have to check him out some day.

All I really wanted to do was point out the bias of the article, not to dump on Naipaul.


I'm so afraid that I agree with him....

I don't know. I think overexposure and fatigue are a far greater problem. Editors and agents simply don't have the time for all the stuff they get.

To me, the article exposes the myth of "great writing" and "great men" far more than the state of the publishing scene. I'd like to see what they chose instead. IMO, the article is incomplete without that:


In the publishing industry every decision against something is a decision for something else.

MrBF1V3
January 1st, 2006, 03:40 PM
I have a dream: I will be struck by lightning, win the lottery and get eaten by a shark all on the same day.

Yeah, I might get published, someday, maybe (yeah right).

I was about to say your odds are the same (for getting published) no matter how many times you play, but that's not true. If a publisher publishes six new writers a year, and you are one of three thousand submitters, you would have less of a chance of being published than if you submitted in a year where one thousand submitted. (diagram that sentence :eek: )

One wonders if there is a way to predict when fewer writers are submitting.

For the record, I don't want a job as an editor. (Too tough.)

Oh, and, I have been published. I'm in the Stories section of sffworld.com :rolleyes: .

B5

Kathryn
January 1st, 2006, 08:34 PM
Many brilliant minds have not been recognised or have even been scoffed at until after they were dead. Capernicus was ridculed until Galileo proved mathmacically that he was correct, the earth goes around the sun not visa versa. (sorry literary names elude me at the moment but you get the gist of it?)

Can you imagine how many people there are out there that have never been "discovered" because overworked editors didn't have time for anything more than a cursory look at the writting? No offence to any editors out there! I can't imagine 50 manuscripts per day!

All in all we are just humans doing the best we can in an imperfect world.

David Forbes
January 1st, 2006, 08:37 PM
That is a rather depressing article. You realize that getting published is more akin to winning a lottery rather than something based on merit and talent.

Expendable
January 1st, 2006, 10:46 PM
That is a rather depressing article. You realize that getting published is more akin to winning a lottery rather than something based on merit and talent.
It can seem like that. Plus you get a lovely bunch of reject letters. But like the lottery, you can't win if you don't play.

David Forbes
January 2nd, 2006, 08:19 AM
It can seem like that. Plus you get a lovely bunch of reject letters. But like the lottery, you can't win if you don't play.

Oh, I'm one of the lucky ones who has an agent and a three-novel contract with a major publisher, and I still find it depressing.

And I collected about 70 rejection letters from agents until I found the one I have. I thought about keeping them all, but most weren't worth the bother.

Holbrook
January 2nd, 2006, 08:40 AM
Depressing?

Yes, in some ways.

A reality check? Most certainly.

I have always felt that submitting my work was a bit like buying a lottery ticket. I would give it a go, while really knowing the chances of my work ever getting there was very narrow indeed. All I ever really hoped for was a few £10 (short story sales) and, after ten years, I am finally beginning to do that.ROFL!