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Sean Wright
January 4th, 2006, 02:28 PM
I know SFF World's very own Gary Wassner meditates regularly. And as any fan of Stars Wars will testify, Master Yoda looks good on it, doesn't he? Did you see him strutting his stuff in Revenge of the Sith? Man, he's one hell of a pliable guy. But seriously, I've been meditating now for almost thirty years. My wife claims I'm always in a state of meditation when I get hooked up to this keyboard, as she tries to communiate but I've left the planet! Or does she claim I'm a zombie? If only I were listening. Anyway, is there anyone out there who also meditates, and does it help you write? Or do you think meditation's a load of New Age, airy fairy, willy-nilly, namby-pamby, headtripping nonsense?

Dawnstorm
January 4th, 2006, 07:18 PM
Lying in the bathe-tub with the lights out helps. That's as close as I get to meditation.

When I read the title ("mediation" outside), I wondered what I would need a mediator for, when writing.

JWREmmett
January 4th, 2006, 08:25 PM
I would avoid writing explicit philosophy. Tolkien avoided that trap.

Sean Wright
January 5th, 2006, 01:18 AM
Lying in the bathe-tub with the lights out helps. That's as close as I get to meditation.

When I read the title ("mediation" outside), I wondered what I would need a mediator for, when writing.

I noticed the typo, tried to change it in the title, but alas it's remained the same. Is there any kind mod out there with the power to erase some not needed mediation for some meditation? :)

kater
January 5th, 2006, 07:29 AM
Consider your happy place restored :D

franjacobs
January 5th, 2006, 07:43 AM
i never mediate, or relax generally. i get bored too quickly! i imagine it helps, if you find it helps, but doesn't if it doesn't! like most things really. i think my stuff is fairly imagintive (but then i would say that)

for me i think rading a lot can help, reading widely can give you ideas, (not neccessarily stolen ideas, but taking an idea someone didn't fully develop and fleshing it otu) or travelling,t aht helps me. but then i get my ideas from all over, i don't have one source for my imagination. so i dont' know really.

dvdrom
January 5th, 2006, 11:22 AM
There's one thing I wouldn't do. And that is to write spiritual/religious, political or philosophical topics into my story on purpose. Because even if you're right--and that's hard enough--you spoil it for those who disagree. Tolkien avoided that trap; many don't.

I beg to differ JWRE. Tolkien's text is very much a religious-ladened text, isn't it. Was the man on some kind of religious crusade - just like his other Inkling buddy, CS Lewis?

Holbrook
January 5th, 2006, 12:19 PM
Nope, don't.

I have found doing mind numbing, boring jobs helps me work through sections of work I am either having problems with, or working out the dialogue. The latter also makes me look as if I am talking to myself :eek:

Long car journeys are good for day dreaming through possible ideas (well only when a passenger ;) )

In fact you could say I just day dream a lot.

KatG
January 5th, 2006, 01:13 PM
I have over the years tried various types of meditation and each time, I tend to just get sleepy. Which means it's useful for helping me go to sleep. It's suppose to have wonderful mental and physical effects, but you have to do it an awful lot. :) I would love the concentration benefits, since I never seem to be allowed to concentrate on anything for more than ten minutes at a time.

KatG
January 5th, 2006, 01:18 PM
I beg to differ JWRE. Tolkien's text is very much a religious-ladened text, isn't it. Was the man on some kind of religious crusade - just like his other Inkling buddy, CS Lewis?


Neither Tolkein nor Lewis were particularly religious in their fiction writings, is my understanding. Lewis wanted above all to do a fun, good tale for kids, since he felt children's fiction had poor pickings. His reputation as a writer on Christian issues came mostly from his non-fiction letters and essays. Tolkein was much more interested in the development of myth and language -- his area of academics -- and borrowed elements from Celtic, Norse, Russian, German and other cultures for LOTR. He first wrote "The Hobbit" as a children's adventure story. LOTR was suppose to be a sequel to that, but ended up being a massive, adult fantasy story instead. It was a project to which he was devoted but not by any accounts a religious crusade of any sort.