PDA

View Full Version : First finished novel


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Pages : [1] 2 3

tordot
February 3rd, 2006, 03:18 PM
Finished my first fantasy novel, now what? And please don't say shove it up my butt...my family already beat you to it. :D

tracyt1800
February 3rd, 2006, 04:47 PM
Finished my first fantasy novel, now what? And please don't say shove it up my butt...my family already beat you to it. :D

Has it been critiqued by non-family members? If not, I'd find a local critique group. The one I go to has definitely helped my writing and cleaned up my stories.

If you've already done that, I don't know because I haven't finished with that process yet.

Tracy

tordot
February 3rd, 2006, 05:24 PM
It has been critiqued by college professors and students, Tracy. One of my former professors said she didn't know what else to teach me...don't know if it's a compliment or I'm a lost cause. :)

tracyt1800
February 3rd, 2006, 05:32 PM
It has been critiqued by college professors and students, Tracy. One of my former professors said she didn't know what else to teach me...don't know if it's a compliment or I'm a lost cause. :)

I'd guess compliment. :)

You might try these threads on deciding between an agent or a publisher:
http://www.sffworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10769

http://www.sffworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12203

Good luck!
Tracy

Sid_Fallon
February 3rd, 2006, 05:33 PM
You might want to leave it for a month, come back and revise/edit again, and again, and again. If you think there isn't anything else you can do to polish it, you can always begin the arduous process of submitting it to agents and publishers.

Arinth
February 3rd, 2006, 06:19 PM
Well no matter what you choose to do with it next, I believe a congratulations is in order.

tordot
February 3rd, 2006, 06:31 PM
Thank you for the links Tracy, Iím still not completely familiar with the site and appreciate the help.


Sid, Iíve done three edits and plan to do a final one when Iím finished with my current novel, which is 80% done. Sometimes Iím afraid of over-editing and develop tunnel vision and doubt that none of the work is any good. :confused:

Thank you, Arinth. They say the first novel is always the hardest, but I didnít find the second one any easier. Maybe the third, eh?

choppy
February 3rd, 2006, 07:04 PM
First off, congratulations.

Second, I tend to ask this a lot. What was the secret of your success? It takes a lot of perserverance to complete a full novel (especially if its one of those fantasy epics). How were you able to trudge through to completion?

Third, my rule of thumb for knowing when something is "good enough" is when I feel that I would be comfortable reading it out loud in front of total strangers - strangers interested in the genre, but strangers none-the-less. Also, you can always send it out and if it doesn't get picked up, chances are you're not finished editing.

Expendable
February 3rd, 2006, 07:09 PM
If you've done three edits and got a thumbs up from a college professor, I think it just might be time to start shopping it around.

ACE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
Imprint of The Berkley Publishing Group, Penguin Group (USA), Inc.
375 Hudson St.
New York NY 10014

Phone: (212) 366-2000
Web: www.penguin.com

EDGE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY PUBLISHING
Box 1714
Calgary, AB T2P 2L7
Canada

Web/writer's guidelines: http://www.edgewebsite.com/authors.html

tordot
February 3rd, 2006, 09:07 PM
Thanks, choppy, I didnít really have a choice when it comes to writing because I never gave myself a safety net to fall back on. I decided to become a writer when I was 14 and began reading and practicing the craft, took an internship at Marvel Comics in high school, and majored in creative writing in college. Writing is the only thing I know how to do.

I also force myself to write at least six hours a day, and if the goal is not met, I have to give up weekends to make amends.


Thank you for the links, Expendable. Now I have to decide whether to get an agent or submit straight up to publishers that still give new writers the time of day.