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Final07
May 6th, 2006, 07:25 PM
Okay, I need help from the more knowledgeable people. I'm currently working on my world and I've come up with a few ideas, but I don't know the effects of it, so....

Is it possible for a planet to orbit stars horizonally instead of the normal counterclockwise movement? If so, how would this effect the planet?

How would a planet be effected if it's solar system rotated with a black hole?

How would 1.30gee (130% of Earth's gravity) effect the geography of a planet?

Dazzlinkat
May 6th, 2006, 08:56 PM
Is it possible for a planet to orbit stars horizonally instead of the normal counterclockwise movement? If so, how would this effect the planet?


Planets can orbit clockwise or counterclockwise. Generally, all planets within a solar system orbit the same way, all clockwise or counterclockwise.

The most infuential parts of a planet's orbit is its shape. All orbits are elipses, or ovals. One end of the orbit will be the closest to the sun and the other will be the farthest. The more extreme the shape, the more extreme the temperature changes on the planet. The closer to circular an orbit, the more constant the planetary temperature.

I am unsure what you mean by horizontal.

Rocket Sheep
May 6th, 2006, 09:49 PM
How would a planet be effected if it's solar system rotated with a black hole?

How would 1.30gee (130% of Earth's gravity) effect the geography of a planet?


A black hole would generate tremendous suction and instability... probably not a healthy addition to a solar system as it would eventually all disappear into it.

A planet would a heavier gravity would be a lot flatter. The forces that push anything up would have to be a lot stronger. Volcanic erruptions would have to be a lot more violent to push anything upward and it would all come rushing down a lot faster. Water on the planet would rush to the lowest points. Animals would be thicker and squatter, but that's okay because all the plants would be too. Anything that moves or grows upward would require a lot more energy/strength. Altogether quite volitile and odd.

Use "affect" in the above questions. ie. How does gravity "affect"... the "effect" of gravity is... Also "it's" only means "it is" there is no apostrophe in a possessive its. Things your spellchecker won't tell you and you probably don't want to hear right now, but for some reason I feel inclined to tell you.

Dazzlinkat
May 6th, 2006, 09:50 PM
How would a planet be effected if it's solar system rotated with a black hole?


Do you mean if its current sun became a black hole or that one of the suns became a black hole.

There would generally be no change to the orbits of the planets. Only objects within the horizon of a black hole experience the massive gravitational pull. The biggest change would be very dark and very cold for all of the planets. Also, only very very large stars become black holes, usually about 10 times the size of our own sun and the horizon would be about 30 kilometers.

choppy
May 6th, 2006, 09:57 PM
A planet would orbit a black hole that same way it would orbit a star. A black hole is just a star that has run out of fuel and that has enough mass that gravitational forces can overcome the neutron degeneracy pressure of the matter that makes it up. The difference is that (aside from x-rays emmited from matter heating up on this side of the event horizon) the hole won't give off any light. Without this light, the planet would be dark and cold and likely life would arise from some other source of energy - geothermal perhaps.

Dazzlinkat
May 6th, 2006, 10:12 PM
How would 1.30gee (130% of Earth's gravity) effect the geography of a planet?

It isn't the degree of gravity that affects the geography of a planet but the affect of moon(s). The greater the mass of a moon and the closer it is, the more it can influence tectonic shifts resulting in earthquakes and volcanic activity.

Final07
May 7th, 2006, 01:45 PM
Do you mean if its current sun became a black hole or that one of the suns became a black hole.

There would generally be no change to the orbits of the planets. Only objects within the horizon of a black hole experience the massive gravitational pull. The biggest change would be very dark and very cold for all of the planets. Also, only very very large stars become black holes, usually about 10 times the size of our own sun and the horizon would be about 30 kilometers.

No that's not what I mean. I mean that a solar system rotates with a black hole. The solar system I've built has three stars (a massive one, an average star, and a white dwarf), and those stars rotate with a far away black hole. So in result, the planets, asteroids, moons, and everything else orbit around the black hole as well. My question was, how would that affect (I knew effect was wrong for some reason :) ) the planets inside the solar system that rotated with the black hole?

Final07
May 7th, 2006, 01:49 PM
It isn't the degree of gravity that affects the geography of a planet but the affect of moon(s). The greater the mass of a moon and the closer it is, the more it can influence tectonic shifts resulting in earthquakes and volcanic activity.

Well, the planet I've created has three moons; one is the larger than earth, but is also the farthest away (500,000 miles), a moon with the diameter of 1000 miles (350,000 miles away), and another with the diameter of 750 miles and 200,000 miles away. Sorry for another question, but now that I've been corrected, how will these moons affect the geography of the planet?

Dazzlinkat
May 7th, 2006, 02:48 PM
Each moon would influence your planet (I dont know the size of your planet so this is just generalization) mainly in tides, if you have oceans. However, there will be times when, say, the two smaller moons are opposite the largest moon, this would either cancel out the tides, or reduce them somwhat (this depends on the MASS, the weight per volume, of your moons. If your largest moon is, say hollow, its mass may equal the combined of the other two, perhaps creating null tides. If completely solid, the other two moons will only SLIGHTLY alter tides, probably not to a noticable level.

Also, there will be times when all three are aligned together, adding their collective 'pulls'. This could cause greater tides, perhaps even tectonic shifts big enough to be felt as earthquakes or volcanic action ( this doesn't always mean eruption, but the shifting of molten rock and gases). Perhaps this is when the magma flows up under springs, and causes geysers to spray. Maybe its a time when a glacier slides farther due to heat from below. Now take this moon alignment time and have it coincide with with the part of your planet's orbit when it is closest to your suns. This unusual or even rare event could cause a volcano to erupt or even an entire 'ring of fire' (a planetary line of active volcanoes) to erupt all at once.

Keep in mind the size of your world. It should be about 5x the size of your biggest moon to give it the gravitational power to keep that moon trapped. Also, the sun is always adding its own pull to the moons. Every year our own moon is moving farther away from Earth at about 3.8cm/year. Are your moons the same age? Is the farthest the oldest and the closest the newest?

Also, ALL orbits in space are elliptical. This is because the stars and planets are moving through space. They can be very close to perfectly circular, though. Our moon has a 5-6%. This means there are times when a moon is closer than normal. Now, if all your moon are at their closest, aligned and your planet is closest to its suns, this could create some radical action. Remeber, this would be an extremely rare event and could cause even more radical 'shifts' of your planet.

Bridie
May 7th, 2006, 03:20 PM
far to complex for me to answer however i do have a question of my own- will you be posting any of this novel when you started writing, im quite interested. Oh and is this james as in final 07 from pellinor proboards? coz i it is, hi long time not see!