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BlueAngel
May 22nd, 2006, 08:28 AM
Since I am using this element alot in my two main novels, I need to do some decent reading on how it behaves and how it's generated. I know its actions are almost always unpredictable in an uncontrolled environment, in fact it takes alot to keep it contained in a lab.
The way I use it with my characters is that some of them can actually generate it with their bodies, and weild it as a weapon, sometimes without being able to control it themselves.

I've done a few different searches on google, but haven't come up with anything that gives me any clear idea how it is generated or how it normally behaves. Any resources you guys might know of that could help? ~Angela

tracyt1800
May 22nd, 2006, 09:34 AM
You might try this Wikipedia entry. It has a fair amount of info and lots of links to external sources that look like they'd be helpful.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_%28physics%29

Tracy

TheEarCollector
May 22nd, 2006, 11:17 AM
As far as I know and understand, the only real way to contain it is by generating a strong magnetic field (which consumes a lot of power which is why it is so hard to contain it in labs).

BlueAngel
May 22nd, 2006, 03:31 PM
Wow, thanx:). Lots of things I need to read in there. I've also read about plasma having to be contained in very strong magnetic fields. One of the things I've also heard about is ball lightning which is basically a plasma ball, it's interesting because for a distance it will actually bounce around until it hits something and explodes. They tried duplicating it in labs but it doesn't last for very long.~Angela

Expendable
May 23rd, 2006, 08:18 PM
A lightning strike can be 100,000,000 volts and can create heat along its path of up to 60,000 degrees F. It's hard to reproduce all that in a lab.

pcarney
May 24th, 2006, 08:14 AM
As its been established that this can't be accomplished in reality- why bother researching it anymore? Use it, call it magic, or what have you, and run with it. I say this out of personal experience. I looked high and low for a scientific explanation of an idea I had, and couldn't find one.

That said- research is half the fun.

BTW- this talk of a ball of energy reminds me of the tai chi I've practiced. A big part of the class was chi kung breathing exercises. Basically, you breath deeply and slowly while moving through a series of postures (not much different then tai chi, I suppose). Another exercise had us holding our hands up, as if they were wrapped around a beach ball, and imagining a ball of energy developing between our hands- that is our chi. Some people swore they could 'feel' it..of course some people swore they knew a guy who could channel healing chi over the phone...
ya....rrriiight...

Dwemer
May 24th, 2006, 11:21 AM
A lightning strike can be 100,000,000 volts.....

I always thought it was 1.21 gigawatts ;)

choppy
May 24th, 2006, 07:19 PM
Just as a though referring to plasma as "ionized" is kind of like referring to water as wet. By its nature, plasma is ionized.

To create a plasma you generally need to apply enough energy to ionize it, or separate its constituent nuclei from their electrons. This phenomenon occurs naturally inside stars. To create it artificially, you need some sort of powerful energy source. You may want to look up inertial confinement fusion to see how this is done with lasers.