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Angel_of_danger
June 15th, 2006, 12:09 AM
I'm not sure who would accept me or not, but I have many ideas stuck in my head and the only way to write them out is to actually have a schedule made up. I can make up a story in 6 months to a week. I just need a publisher to actually publish such ideas. I'm not revealing the idea until somebody emails me at either of these two emails below.

I don't want a publisher that makes me pay because I really don't have the money to do such a thing. Unless there is a publishing company that could deal with monthly plans that can be less than 40 dollars a month.

Expendable
June 15th, 2006, 03:08 AM
You don't need a publisher, you need an agent.

Neither one will touch you if you don't have something to show. Definitely avoid anyone who expects you to pay up front or wants to send your manuscript to book doctor. That's a scam. Real agents make a percentage from selling your story. Publishers are suppose to pay you.

Create your own schedule, start writing.

Think about submitting some short stories to magazines, web sites. Get your name out there.

Holbrook
June 15th, 2006, 03:35 AM
A publisher or agent rarely look at just "plans" or outlines. Even a well known writer has to work hard to "sell" an idea.

For a newbie an agent or publisher wants to see a finished product, something they think they can sell. Remember publishing is a business. A good agent will be receiving upwards of 30 new manuscripts a week, that's roughly 1560 upwards a year! All finished products. All hoping to break through. I suggest you get the Writers' and Artists' Year book and go through it. It lists dos and don'ts, agents and publishers.

BrianC
June 15th, 2006, 07:59 AM
PAY NOTHING UPFRONT. Reputable agents and respectable publishers make money by selling the product of your imagination. They do not make money by charging you to read/edit/publish, etc. that product.

That having been said, only non-fiction is sold on proposal. Fiction, which is what I assume you are talking about, is sold by querying and submitting finished product, whether it's a novel, short story, poem, song or whatever.

When I was close to finishing my first novel I wondered whether I could start querying agents even though the product was not yet finished. So, I asked around here and got some very good advice: wait, focus on good writing, then market the finished product.

KatG
June 16th, 2006, 07:21 PM
I'm not sure who would accept me or not, but I have many ideas stuck in my head and the only way to write them out is to actually have a schedule made up. I can make up a story in 6 months to a week.

Novel or short fiction? They are different markets.


I just need a publisher to actually publish such ideas.

Yes, well, so does everybody else.


I'm not revealing the idea until somebody emails me at either of these two emails below.

I have enough ideas of my own, thanks. Very few people have the time or the inclination to steal your ideas. (And in any case, ideas are not copyrightable.) Which is not to say that being circumspect is a bad thing, but let's leave James Bond and secret code words out of it.


I don't want a publisher that makes me pay because I really don't have the money to do such a thing. Unless there is a publishing company that could deal with monthly plans that can be less than 40 dollars a month.

Okay, so we're ruling out self-publishing and vanity presses. The latter you might want to rule out anyway, because there's too much chance of a scam operation. However, there are quite a few companies that will help you self-publish your book, in print or electronic form. But if money -- and time to do the work of a publisher yourself -- is tight, then you're looking at trying to find a publisher who likes your stuff and is willing to put it out there.


Oh, and I do write songs and poems, so if you want to look at them, go at this website www.bkentertainment.zoomshare.com. It has some of the poems/songs that I wrote and put on the site for a while now. Don't mind the title page once the website is loaded.

Um, we're discouraging this sort of thing -- links to other sites -- with the request that material you want members to look at only be posted on SFFWorld in the Stories section of the site. You're not trying to sell anything, but it is a form of advertising, and we have to be fair and treat everybody the same. I'll let you read this post, and then I'll remove the link to your site, okay?

So, publishers. In the book world, for sff, there are non-category publishers who sometimes publish works of sff (but probably not your main interest.) There are category sff imprints, which are arms of large publishers, such as Bantam Spectra and Del Rey in the U.S., Warner Orbit in the U.K., and so on. There are medium and small-sized publishers who also specialize in sff. And there are a few web publishers, though a lot of that market is very new. All of us are trying to get this relatively small group of publishers to produce our novels, which does make it a bit difficult, but everyone has the chance to try.

You can also try to get a literary agent, who works for you, markets your novel to publishers, does contracts and looks after your interests. Those are hard to get willing to represent you too, for the same reasons, but again, you can attempt to interest them in your work. If a publisher is interested, they can buy the license to publication rights in your work. In return for that license, the publisher pays you royalties, a percentage of the monies for books sold. Sometimes, a publisher may pay the author an advance against royalties -- an estimation of what the publisher expects the author to earn in royalties.

If you are trying to market short stories, there are still quite a few sff magazines, who have different requirements and approaches. You do not need an agent to help with short fiction sales. You can submit stories to magazines -- many of them now on the web -- and see if you get accepted. Payment for short fiction ranges from no payment but an author credit, to a small payment by word. There are a number of sites that offer information about short fiction and other sff markets, but a good one to start with is ralan.com. It also may help if you read a few guides about the book publishing industry and how it operates, if you are interested in publishing novels.