PDA

View Full Version : First manuscript.


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Protagonist
June 25th, 2006, 04:01 PM
I'm not sure how to state this questions, but I'm writing a series of 8 books and I'm almost finished the first one and I'm wondering, what is the least number of pages it is reasonable to make a manuscript? I'm writing in one sided A4, and I want to know how many pages it should be in this given situation.:D Hope you can understand, thanking you in advance.

KatG
June 25th, 2006, 06:19 PM
It depends on a lot of factors -- what sort of story you are writing, etc. Common formatting for a manuscript is double-spaced, not single-spaced, but pages matter less than word count.

The minimum amount of words for a work to be considered a novel keeps shrinking. The lowest I've seen called a novel is "The Clothes They Stood Up In" which had to be around 18,000 words. But the usual lower end word count is 45,000 words. A sf novel is usually on average between 75,000-100,000 words, but longer ones are not uncommon now. Fantasy novels tend to run longer, except for the occasional slender tome. Horror novels vary in length widely.

Does that help at all?

Protagonist
June 26th, 2006, 12:56 AM
Extremely, thanks!:D

Protagonist
June 27th, 2006, 06:21 AM
When you say double spacing, do you mean between each word?

PlanetRetcon
June 27th, 2006, 06:27 AM
When you say double spacing, do you mean between each word?

No, double spacing means leaving a space between

each line. You do that on a manuscript because...

Well, to be honest, I don't know. On rough drafts,

it's nice because you can jot notes between lines

easily, but on a final draft, it serves no purpose

except to make the manuscript easier to read. Yeah,

that's probably why you do it. Make it easier on the

editor.

James Barclay
June 27th, 2006, 08:14 AM
That is why you do it and why you should do it. Anything that makes the mss easier for the editor to read is a Good Thing. :)

NOM

Mock
June 27th, 2006, 08:17 AM
(There's a thing on Microsoft Word that you can click to make it automatically double-spaced, so you don't have to do it yourself.)

KatG
June 27th, 2006, 03:42 PM
No, double spacing means leaving a space between

each line. You do that on a manuscript because...

Well, to be honest, I don't know. On rough drafts,

it's nice because you can jot notes between lines

easily, but on a final draft, it serves no purpose

except to make the manuscript easier to read. Yeah,

that's probably why you do it. Make it easier on the

editor.


LOL, well there are a few other reasons too. Readability is the big one. It also keeps authors from trying to cram so many words onto one page that it gets even harder to read.

But the other reason is that editors still write editing notes in pencil on the ms. in the margins and between the lines, or on post-its attached to the ms. The copyeditor also is going over and making copy corrections in blue or red pencil between the lines. (That's why they want the 1 inch margins too.) All this editing would be very difficult to do if the ms. was single-spaced. Even though some editing and revising may be done on the computer these days, and even though editors are doing much less line-editing on the ms. unfortunately, double-spacing just makes it all easier.