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Creator
July 19th, 2006, 01:51 AM
Guys I am writing my own version of Mothra something like what the new King Kong would be......

But I have some questions what kind of anatomical changes should be made if Insects are to grow large.

I know the answers lie in the exoskeleton and respiration systems.

have theorized an answer
The insects of Mothra's island have advanced air pumps which accelearate the rate of diffusion of air into the cells!

http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/_0_0/constraint_12
The next headache issues are moulting and weight of exoskeleton

Creator
July 19th, 2006, 03:44 AM
Hello? anyone out there?

Dawnstorm
July 19th, 2006, 04:22 AM
Hi,

Interesting topic. I have little to add, though, as I'm not an etymologist. I've heard about these things mostly in relation to the movie "Them!" ("Why giant ants aren't feasible", "science fiction blunders" etc.). I'm no etymologist, and I'd have to research it as well.

Your link doesn't work, I get to the berkely-page, but the specific page doesn't appear. I suspect, it's the "evolib..." part that puzzles the browser. ;)

Creator
July 19th, 2006, 04:35 AM
I just want to see if anyone can see a countermeasure over the size constraints of arthropods.

Basically, I think I only managed to see that air pumps can overcome some aspects of the problems.....

PlanetRetcon
July 19th, 2006, 05:01 AM
I just want to see if anyone can see a countermeasure over the size constraints of arthropods.

Basically, I think I only managed to see that air pumps can overcome some aspects of the problems.....

Well, in theory, let's say you want a giant Moth the size of, say an elephant. It'd have to have thick legs like an elephant, and a pretty hefty ribcage (or something that serves the same purpose, I have no clue if your air pumps would do it) to keep the body from collapsing in on itself. Then, it needs the wings to hold it in the air... Not gonna happen. There's a reason that the largest animal on Earth lives in the ocean, and the largest land animal is much smaller, and the largest animal that can fly is smaller still.

As far as arthropods in general... Well... I would have to look up 'arthropod' to be sure you mean 'insect' so I'm not going to be much help. I do know that the square/cube law will get you every time, though. Double the size of the moth, his leg gets twice as long, but the amount of skin (or whatever, I don't know what it is, but that's not the important part) goes up 4 times, and the "stuff" contained within that skin goes up by 8 times. Eventually, the skin can't hold in the body, and the body comes out. In a messy puddle of green insect goo, I would guess.

Creator
July 19th, 2006, 05:15 AM
Don't worry I know that fact too well

Anyway my mothra is only about 8 metre wingspan

BrianC
July 19th, 2006, 10:49 AM
Isn't the largest living thing (not animal) on earth the Great Barrier Reef? Thought I heard that somewhere. Anyway, maybe your mega-size insect could actually be cooperative colonies of micro-creepies--like army ants making a bridge to cross a stream but much more sophisticated. Well, that's my goofy idea . . .

Dazzlinkat
July 20th, 2006, 11:37 AM
Have you considered air-bladders? Some fish use airbladders for bouyance (sp?) I see no reason an insect cant have strategic bladders of helium or hydrogen (prob hydrogen as that would be easier for a living organism to harvest). Also, the outer shells could also be hollow like birds bones. They are still very strong but much lighter. The wing supports could be hollow, too.

Creator
July 20th, 2006, 09:07 PM
I have planned to honeycombed the exoskeleton of the bugs. your suggestion has been though of already last night thanks.....

And the Air bladders ideas are great! but how will Mothra use it up. and Hydrogen is flammable.

Creator
July 20th, 2006, 09:12 PM
and also is Mothra a herbivore or carnivore