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ArdusKane
May 26th, 2007, 11:52 PM
Hello everyone! I just discovered this forum last night. :D

When coming up with names, I tend to Google it to see if it has been taken by someone else. An example is the name "Kalimdor". If you haven't played Warcraft III, you might use this name in a fantasy story of yours. When people read it, they might think, "Hey, you got this name off Warcraft!"

Does anyone else think this way? :o

James Carmack
May 27th, 2007, 03:39 AM
It's not a bad idea to cross-check your names. Of course, when called on a choice of yours, you can always claim it's an homage. ^_^

Bethelamon
May 27th, 2007, 09:09 AM
I always do a quick google search on my names before i use them, just incase I have subconciously copied them or they have just been invented before.

Miriamele
May 27th, 2007, 09:15 AM
Yes, I do this too. It's just about impossible to come up with a name that truly doesn't exist anywhere, but I'm happy if at least the name is not used in another fantasy book.

Determining names are a very difficult aspect of writing for me. I feel it is important to choose a name that is not only fitting to the character but to the setting. I change my characters' names all the time, thus driving myself crazy. :)

Wolf_
May 27th, 2007, 02:18 PM
yes, occasionly I have sometimes stolen a name by accident, but it is real hard coming up with original ones.

choppy
May 27th, 2007, 04:28 PM
I think this is one of those reasons why it pays to be well read in the area you write in. Naturally, you can't have read everything - no one can. But you can avoid calling your telekinetic police officers 'jedi.'

One of the great things about word processing software is the find and replace option. Changing a name globally throughout a document is simple.

Wolf_
May 27th, 2007, 05:08 PM
I think this is one of those reasons why it pays to be well read in the area you write in. Naturally, you can't have read everything - no one can. But you can avoid calling your telekinetic police officers 'Jedi.'

One of the great things about word processing software is the find and replace option. Changing a name globally throughout a document is simple.

as choppy has stated, there are ones you can avoid. the value of text editors is incalculable- my dodgy keyboard has a habit of sticking,so its nice to have something that lets you undo that mistake (as i have painfully learned).

MrBF1V3
May 27th, 2007, 10:56 PM
Most of the names I use are on the edge of common, so of course there will be some familiarity. I've heard titles aren't copyrighted, are names?

B5

Wolf_
May 28th, 2007, 04:06 AM
Most of the names I use are on the edge of common, so of course there will be some familiarity. I've heard titles aren't copyrighted, are names?

B5

a little birdie once told me that words in your native language canot be copyrighted (e.g: the "scourge" can have many fictionous charecters associated with it,because it is used as a descriptive word to describe someones personalitly.however,if say,you called your race of hyper evolving critters "Zerg",blizzard would stamp you with a lawsuit 10 seconds flat (unless your cunning and changed the spelling)).

James Carmack
May 28th, 2007, 06:44 AM
You can't copyright names, but you can trademark them. George Lucas did a lot of that with Star Wars, for instance. It takes time, money and effort, so I don't recommend it under most circumstances. Unless those names essentially become a brand, there's no real reason to be trademarking names.