PDA

View Full Version : Are there any bad ideas?


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6

hippokrene
July 12th, 2007, 01:59 PM
I've often played with the notion that there is no such thing as a 'bad idea' when it comes to fiction. Ideas aren't good, bad, or middling. Instead, any idea can be turned into a good story, if properly shaped.

What do you think?

In addition, I plan to try this theory out. Would anyone like to suggest a bad story idea (one or two sentences long) that I could try my hand at?

Abby
July 12th, 2007, 02:35 PM
Yes. Yes there are.

Okay, here's a bad idea: Why don't you write a story with six climactic scenes instead of one? Or how about a story with 10 main protagonists? Or better yet ... why not write one that involves werewolves, zombies, pirates, ghosts, Amazon women with guns, a monkey, a plague, and magic?

Woadwarrior
July 12th, 2007, 02:55 PM
Okay, here's a bad idea: Why don't you write a story with six climactic scenes instead of one? Or how about a story with 10 main protagonists? Or better yet ... why not write one that involves werewolves, zombies, pirates, ghosts, Amazon women with guns, a monkey, a plague, and magic?

Those aren't 'bad' ideas... they can be used for a parody! Seriously, all you need to make fun of cliches and poke fun at the concept and put all those people in together. 10 main protangonists vs pirates, werewolves, vampires, ghosts, amazons, a troop of rabid monkies and Ronald McDonald. :p

I can just see the mayham and insanity brewing in my mind...

Arinth
July 12th, 2007, 03:23 PM
A bad idea is a story without a conflict, as long as there is a conflict you can make it worth reading

virangelus
July 12th, 2007, 03:33 PM
I'll have to agree that as long as verisimilitude (or the lack of it for parody use) is established, you can do just about anything with almost any plot. Just don't mention any "Forests of Doom" for the love of God, and we'll be friends.

Great example I can think of in terms of bringing bad plots to life???

Dragon Ball Z... no.. seriously... it's the same darn thing every season. New enemy appears, has power level unheard of, characters don't even FIGHT they just wiggle they're arms really fast and create motion lines, and somehow somebody will train and wiggle they're arms fast enough till they too acheive power level unheard of to stomp the new enemy out. Next season comes and guess what? It happens again! So they did this for what I might say was at least five seasons, and it was eaten up by people at my highschool.

So yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus.

Taramoc
July 12th, 2007, 07:45 PM
If you keep it generic, any story can be good (10 main characters? 6 Climxes? Read Erikson and you'll love that).

But if you go in detail there's a lot of possible stories that are "bad" and too dull to be even parodies.

How about:

"A blind girl, addicted to the tactile sensation of her fingers on the Tarmac of the runaway of the airport near her house, is sad because her parents wants to move"

You can give this assignment to the best writer in the world, I'm pretty sure I'm going to hate it.

lin
July 12th, 2007, 08:04 PM
The Little Engine That Couldn't Really Give A Damn

Incurious George

The Three Little Maggots

Raiders Of The Lost Car Keys

James Carmack
July 12th, 2007, 08:07 PM
There are most definitely plenty of ideas only a mother could love. Are there any ideas out there so bad that no one, no matter how skilled, can put a positive spin on them? I don't know. It strikes me as a challenge. (Must resist urge to actually try Taramoc's idea...)

For the most part, though, it all comes down to execution. (The common refrain to is "Ideas are cheap", am I right?)

I think our perception of good and bad in relation to ideas depends on their resonance with our imagination. This, of course, varies from person to person, so one man's bad idea could very well be another man's vision of sheer genius.

Abby
July 12th, 2007, 08:47 PM
For the most part, though, it all comes down to execution.
That's right. I do believe it's all about the execution.

China Meiville pulled off a critically acclaimed novel that involved vampiric pirates, mansquitoes, a bounty hunter with a sword that can slice through layers of reality, a Goth librarian, an octopus man, crayfish men, and magic. He sort of pulled it off, anyway. I hold that if he'd added Amazons or werewolves, it all would have fallen apart.

lin
July 12th, 2007, 09:45 PM
But not all stories have executions in them. Bad or otherwise.

Apocalypto did.