PDA

View Full Version : David Lynch's Dune


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Zsinj
July 22nd, 2010, 06:29 PM
So I picked up David Lynch's movie adaptation of Frank Herbert's epic, Dune, the other day at Wal-Mart, and I was pleased when I watched it for the first time. I would venture to say that this film is a work of art. Upon remembering seeing the latest one, the Sci-Fi channel version, I remember that it had better visuals, but that's about it. In my mind, David Lynch's version is much more accurate to the book. Plus David Lynch's Dune starred my cousin in it; Francesca Annis as Lady Jessica Atreides.
The reason why I brought this up is because when I saw this film, I sensed in it an underlying menace, a creepyness if you will that I couldn't pin down. Though I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, this eeriness disturbed me a bit and set me on edge. I mentioned this to my friend who also owns the film, and he said he noticed it too. In fact, he said because of it, it gave him "the willies" when he saw it for the first time as a little kid.
So has anyone else noticed this indefinable creepy underlying menaced to the movie? What is it about it that makes it this way?

Sparrow
July 23rd, 2010, 01:29 AM
So I picked up David Lynch's movie adaptation of Frank Herbert's epic, Dune, the other day at Wal-Mart, and I was pleased when I watched it for the first time. I would venture to say that this film is a work of art. Upon remembering seeing the latest one, the Sci-Fi channel version, I remember that it had better visuals, but that's about it. In my mind, David Lynch's version is much more accurate to the book. Plus David Lynch's Dune starred my cousin in it; Francesca Annis as Lady Jessica Atreides.
The reason why I brought this up is because when I saw this film, I sensed in it an underlying menace, a creepyness if you will that I couldn't pin down. Though I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, this eeriness disturbed me a bit and set me on edge. I mentioned this to my friend who also owns the film, and he said he noticed it too. In fact, he said because of it, it gave him "the willies" when he saw it for the first time as a little kid.
So has anyone else noticed this indefinable creepy underlying menaced to the movie? What is it about it that makes it this way?


It's because like 2001, A Space Odyssey the movie Dune has a quiet foreboding about it. It's the big difference really great directors can make... Alien is the other movie, and John Carpenter's The Thing are also along those lines.

I remember going to see Dune when it originally came out.
They gave everyone a little booklet to help explain the Dune universe just in hopes the audience wouldn't be completely lost during the movie. As it was I still had to explain things to my friends.

Chuffalump
July 23rd, 2010, 02:27 AM
I was very disappointed with the storyline compromises in this film. The sound weapons being the one that really irritated me. The sardaukar in their hazmat suits and the wormrider hooks were a mild niggle. The rushed start of the film where Irulan fades out and then reappears to say 'Oh, by the way, I'm Princess Irulan'. Grrrrrrrr. I understand compromises would need to be made in converting such an epic book but why change the way the worms are ridden and steered?

However, on the plus side, I thought it was beautifully shot and really captured the atmosphere of the book.

Sparrow
July 23rd, 2010, 09:58 AM
However, on the plus side, I thought it was beautifully shot and really captured the atmosphere of the book.


The artistic style was a neat blend of art noveau/deco, and of course steampunk. It was a really odd mix that somehow worked.

Zsinj
July 23rd, 2010, 01:21 PM
I would really love to see them do an entire reboot of Dune and have them make films of the entire saga, I'd say it's about time they did.

txshusker
July 30th, 2010, 05:53 PM
I never made it through the book, much less its successors - though I own 4 - so i can't judge waht was missing... But I prefer the SciFi's mini series. I thought the Lynch version jumped about too much and was spotty in depth at best. Having a longer running time of the mini series helped grow the depth of the characters, especially the importance of the love triangle, and the growth of Paul's powers. Lynch's version isn't horrendous (I watched it about 3 weeks ago when it came on again), I just think it lacks connection.

PeterWilliam
July 30th, 2010, 10:03 PM
However, on the plus side, I thought it was beautifully shot and really captured the atmosphere of the book.

I used to own it on VHS (ok, so I date myself a bit) and now have it on DVD. I must admit to never having read the book, however. That having been said, I truly enjoyed the movie and still re-watch it occasionally.

I assume I would enjoy the story much more, but I don't know where to start. I've seen some threads that complain about some of the books being written for the sake of money, so I'm not sure which to pick up and which to avoid.

Chuffalump
August 1st, 2010, 01:31 PM
Stick with Dune and don't bother with any of the rest.

If, however, you read Dune and really feel like reading more then take the original series one at a time with plenty of pause for thought between. I found them a bit depressing. As for the prequels..... better just pretend they aren't related at all.

Hobbit
August 1st, 2010, 03:24 PM
Taking one for the team, I watched the Extended version of Dune yesterday: the three hour version. (Here's the 'new' prologue: LINK (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FUAQ-dAh0g))

There's a lot I don't like about it: 'The Sleeper will awaken' nonsense, the use of sound as a weapon, some of the awful dialogue.... and yet there are still elements that are good. It's a shame we didn't see the extra-long version, but I do think the extended version gives us a better idea of what Lynch was trying to achieve.

I did see the original on the cinema screen: and yes, I remember the leaflets give to try and explain what was going on, too!

Mark