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The Lord of all Things Inane
November 8th, 2010, 11:41 AM
I read about the theory of mitochondria starting out as a bacteria, and eventually "proving useful" to animal cells. Mitochondria have their own DNA, and a makeup similar to prokaryotic cells.
I think that sounds pretty cool! Anybody else have some science theory gems? Stuff like that can be a boon to Sci Fi as well as Fantasy writing.
CDN

The Lord of all Things Inane
November 9th, 2010, 03:45 PM
There is a theory that mitochondria came before chloroplasts, plants have chloroplasts AND mitochondria.
Now, this is just me saying this.. What if plants were mobile at one time? Modern plants have limited movement, ie: Venus Fly Trap, Sun Flowers, and ordinary plants can turn themselves to the light. What if they were mobile? Walking slowly through a pre historic land, nomadic gatherers of sustenance.
Maybe it got so difficult to gain the nutrients needed, that they learned and evolved, and put down roots. Cellulose and the other constituents of plant life would not leave us fossils, only fossil fuels! How would we know? Modern plants have veins, cells, ability to generate ATP. Imagine, a forest of trees migrating to new feeding grounds.....
CDN

Evil Agent
November 9th, 2010, 06:51 PM
I'm not from a science background, but I've been reading more and more science.

I'd highly recommend Bill Bryson's book "A Short History of Nearly Everything". He discusses the evolution of science and many of the major discoveries, along with all kinds of amazing factoids/theories/funny anecdotes. A great read, especially for the lay person.

If you want something a little more intense, I'm currently reading Richard Dawkins' "The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution" in which the professor attempts to lay out some of the mountain of evidence for evolution by Darwinian natural selection. Some cool stuff, but heavier on the science side of things.

The Lord of all Things Inane
November 9th, 2010, 07:03 PM
I'm not from a science background, but I've been reading more and more science.

I'd highly recommend Bill Bryson's book "A Short History of Nearly Everything". He discusses the evolution of science and many of the major discoveries, along with all kinds of amazing factoids/theories/funny anecdotes. A great read, especially for the lay person.

If you want something a little more intense, I'm currently reading Richard Dawkins' "The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution" in which the professor attempts to lay out some of the mountain of evidence for evolution by Darwinian natural selection. Some cool stuff, but heavier on the science side of things.

Sounds cool! I am definitely not from a scientific back ground, i am more like a science experiment! I just find everything so fascinating sometimes. Thank you for responding. I will try to check out those books(if the library has them)
CDN

goldhawk
November 9th, 2010, 07:49 PM
One thing that caught my eye was using the reverse Casimir Effect (http://scienceblog.com/cms/scientists-reverse-casimir-effect-13866.html) to create a propellant-less rocket engine.

The Lord of all Things Inane
November 9th, 2010, 10:32 PM
One thing that caught my eye was using the reverse Casimir Effect (http://scienceblog.com/cms/scientists-reverse-casimir-effect-13866.html) to create a propellant-less rocket engine.

The force of nature, the glue that binds all things, reversed! Even at a nano scale, that is out there. Thank you Gold Hawk.
CDN

Ramirez
November 12th, 2010, 04:55 PM
The other day I heard from someone that when a dolphin ejaculates the pressure is so strong that it could blow your head off. I don't know if this is true, but it immediately made me think of the Hitchhiker's series.