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Holbrook
August 18th, 2002, 07:25 AM
Erebus' comment on another thread started me thinking. He said that sometimes when he re-reads a peice of work it is so far beyond what he has written before, he has doubts that he, himself wrote the words

Has this happened to you? Has there been something that you have written, a small passage section or piece that stands out in your mind, as it went well beyond what you thought you were capable of?

It has happened to me, twice. Twice within a month I wrote a piece than transended anything else I wrote, and I doubt I will ever again capture the intense feeling and thoughts that were behind the pieces.

At that time my life was changing forever, my father was dying, fighting hard, but slowly loosing ground. Over three months I stood by his side and watched his personal battle to live. My thoughts were a maze of what ifs and pain. For my relationship with my father had not always been agood one.

At the time I was trying to write a factual article, it did not turn out as it should have. This is how it did turn out.

Reflections (http://home.arachsys.com/~chris/sue/Reflections.doc)

The second piece was written the day after he died. This piece later on last year, a few days after 9/11, caught the eye of a friend in the states and he asked if he could send it on to a few of his friends. I have no idea how many people have read this. But I hope those that have, have found something in it beyond mere words.

ritual (http://home.arachsys.com/~chris/sue/Ritual.doc)

juzzza
August 18th, 2002, 04:09 PM
First of all Old Boy, thank you for sharing those articles (soul snaps)... Quite lovely.

I have to say that the first one especially, was very inspiring and very interesting. You are obviously an excellent article writer and I hope you will be putting this skill to use for SFFW... It is also clear that you are very passionate about weapons and I love the deconstruction of the sword...

For me, the one piece that flips me out a bit and makes me wonder what on earth I was on that day, has to be 700 words or its actual title 'Common Sense'.

I had the idea for a while then, I think last Sunday, it came together in about an hour. I was so excited I posted it straight to SFFW... And got a b*llocking for Big 'E' for it...

http://www.sffworld.org/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3119

Thanks

Holbrook
August 18th, 2002, 04:38 PM
I had the idea for a while then, I think last Sunday, it came together in about an hour. I was so excited I posted it straight to SFFW... And got a b*llocking for Big 'E' for it...



Wasn't a B*llocking more of a gentle reminder. ;)

I like it very much. The choice of words match each emotion/sense with such clarity. That is something I could never do 700 words!!

Hell in a bucket... I am having trouble keeping my latest effort down to 2500. I have been working on it and another piece on and off all day.

The 2500 piece has flowed like red wine, bubbling out, but I only have 700 words to finish the peice, strange that :eek:

The other looks like being 5000 at least and then it could be the first section of a book, it has the promise of one...


I know what you mean about being "on something" writing is a drug I have always said so, once your are hooked you are done for life... I often curse when my "real life" intrudes.

As for my passion for weapons it was born of a simple desire to understand the nature of the items I wanted to equip my characters with simple as that.

milamber_reborn
August 19th, 2002, 01:21 AM
There was a section in my novel where a main character was dying and struggling with personal demons. I was totally in character and the words poured out.

Also, my two short stories I recently wrote. The last, The Coming, I felt was my best writing to date and I've submitted it to a mag. The other, Torment, I had in my portfolio on stories.com Someone reviewed it and said it was a good, moving piece, so I got across the feelings I wanted the reader to have.

Brid14
October 1st, 2002, 02:40 PM
I don't think I've ever written something that has really made me proud - but recently I did write the ending of a story where two friends part on very bitter terms. One is going to get married, but when her friend (who is a kind of mermaid-creature) begs her to stay, she doesn't care, and it breaks her friend's heart. The friend grabs her hand, even though it really hurts her to touch humans, but she won't let go.
I thought that it was a very moving scene, and actually very good - one of my best.

But have any of you ever read "Where the Red Fern Grows"? it's a really simple story - boy who gets to dogs, raises them to be the best coon hunters ever, and they die - but at the end I actually cried, it was so sad. The love that the boy felt for those dogs and they felt for each other was so REAL - so well portrayed.

Kilroy
October 1st, 2002, 11:14 PM
The one I'm most proud of is one i started writing as a class project, just an idea i picked up to fullfill a requirement. I wrote it in about 2 hours and i read it over again and thought to myself 'Damn this is Good!'. It's called "The Long Farewell". The rest of you will be able to read it when it wins the short story contest. I hope.

kahnovitch
October 2nd, 2002, 08:27 AM
I did a couple of pieces that gave me chills.
One I was going to use as a stand-alone short but then realised it had potential for much more. I dug it up recently as it was on my Commodore Amiga and I'm re-writing it on Word.
Another was when one of my characters wasn't sure if he was alive or dead as he found himself floating in total darkness and silence and unable to move.