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Pluvious
February 6th, 2003, 09:47 PM
I'm wondering how many non-published authors believe they will someday be published?

Do you think you might possibly be published? Do you simply write because you enjoy it and don't worry about being published? Do you know that you will be published after finishing a project that you are planning or working on?

Also, if you believe you will be published do you think the novel will be well received? I mean do are you thinking a potential best-seller at some point? Self-published? Or a midlist book? And what about mainstream or genre fiction?

I'm asking this to see how people actually view themselves and their potential. Do you know how good you are and how good you Can Be?

For me I'm almost positive that I will get published when I finish working on my first novel. I know this sounds conceited and I realize that as you read this you are extremely skeptical. But its simply what I believe. I have seen others and I know what I can do.

Of course I am putting more time into research and development than any published author would adivse. But I want to write a great novel, something I believe in, something that both entertains and alalyzes the human condition.

Despite this time spent I am unsure how my work will be received by the general public. Besides the fact that it is not written (which would help) I am unable to predict whether I can write something that a wide audience will appreciate...not to mention the critics. And although the novel/series is fantasy based it really is more than that (which complicates things).

Maybe a greater understanding of how will my work will be received will come as I write and get feedback. Time will tell...

milamber_reborn
February 6th, 2003, 10:19 PM
I'm supremely confident in my ability and my rapid growth as a writer. My first piece of writing was a long novel which I know is not good enough to be published. Since then I've been writing short stories that I am slowly getting out to zines and contests. Critiques have been favourable but I'm still waiting on a magazine to get back to me. I'm confident I can sell my short stories before I move on to longer works.

Cephus
February 6th, 2003, 11:49 PM
I honestly don't worry about it. I write because I have stories to tell. If they get published, fine. If not, fine. My ultimate goal has never been, nor will it ever be to make a living writing, I simply have no interest in that. I write because I want to, I refuse to produce on a deadline. If it takes me 6 months to write a chapter, so be it. I won't speed up the process to suit anyone else.

Pluvious
February 7th, 2003, 01:23 AM
I understand what you mean Cephus, but are you being completely honest with us here? Or maybe you were simply stating what is MOST important to you.

I also do not write for a living or want to write anything on a deadline or because "that is what sells".

But I do write because I would like people to view my ideas. What's the purpose of keeping everything to myself? I might as well just keep everything in my head.

I'm not ashamed to admit some degree of vanity. Someday I may journey to Asia, but a buddhist monk I am not.

I was just hoping you might give us an indication as to how you view your ability to understand your own writing skills and how others might potentially see them.

I, Brian
February 7th, 2003, 02:03 AM
I write to be a published author. I took some bad knocks over "Chronicles of Empire" but still intend to see it published one day, albeit in a revised form.

The novel I'm writing at the moment - "Emperor" - was written specifically for the markets. It still contains a lot of my ideas, but the style is different from what I'm used to.

I have a sense of destiny that I will be published, but now I have to try and be realistic - it will take more time and more hard work.

There's never any point daydreaming about writing a best-seller. Simply aiming for a big publishing house to take my work is a start. Everything else can proceed from there.

kahnovitch
February 7th, 2003, 09:44 AM
You have to be confidence to succeed, but also resilient and determined. Getting published for the first time (if that is your goal) can be an extremely soul destroying experience.
There you are pouring your mind, body and soul into a single creation, which then may be flung back in your face, possibly over and over again.
Feedback from others is always good and can help tell you how much appeal your work may have to a potential market or which elements you need to work on etc.

choppy
February 7th, 2003, 11:07 AM
I hope to be published at some point. I enjoy writing, and I know that I have improved considerably - even in the last few years. Right now though, publishing any of my work is not a priority.

I'm not sure if my writing will be well-recieved or not. I tend to tackle controversial issues, and present viewpoints that are not entirely reflective of the "mainstream." In the end if my work gets people to really open up their minds then I'll be happy.

Drewby
February 8th, 2003, 11:55 AM
I am not sure whether I will ever be published or not. I certainyl wish to make a career out of writing and my art, but no one can be sure of what the future holds.

I honestly don't think about it much. I just write. I do it for myself as well as the readers. It is fun and a good escape from reality to get lost in your own worlds. If the readers like it, if it becomes a top seller, good. But I am not breaking my back to be a people pleaser although the fans are important as well.

So, I hope to be published and I think if I continue to work (I am only 16 right now and I have gotten some very promising encouragement from people in the literature world) I can be a published writer, not sure if I will be #1, but I know that I can be published and that there will be people that like my stories.

Cephus
February 10th, 2003, 01:04 AM
Originally posted by Pluvious
[B]I understand what you mean Cephus, but are you being completely honest with us here? Or maybe you were simply stating what is MOST important to you.

I am stating exactly what is important to me.


I also do not write for a living or want to write anything on a deadline or because "that is what sells".

There was a time, many, many years ago when I did artwork and made money at it. But it got to the point where people were demanding things that they had no right to demand, so I closed up shop and never drew for money again. I've found that if I don't get personal enjoyment out of it and the freedom to create what *I* want to create, I won't do it. No deadlines, no editors, no demands, no changes. I do it because I want to.


But I do write because I would like people to view my ideas. What's the purpose of keeping everything to myself? I might as well just keep everything in my head.

Anyone can read my work. I've been writing, in one form or another, in this universe for nearly 20 years. Many people have read about the world. None of them has ever paid me a penny to do so however. I don't keep it in my head, I produce plenty of stories, I simply have no interest in peddling them to the masses.

Cephus
February 10th, 2003, 01:08 AM
Originally posted by Drewby
[B]I honestly don't think about it much. I just write. I do it for myself as well as the readers. It is fun and a good escape from reality to get lost in your own worlds. If the readers like it, if it becomes a top seller, good. But I am not breaking my back to be a people pleaser although the fans are important as well.

The best writers are the ones who write for themselves. You can always tell the difference between an author who writes what they want to read and one who writes the most popular tripe imaginable, just to sell a book.

The fans are important, but only important if they become fans because of your work, not because your work caters to them initially. If you're writing LOTR rip-offs because they're popular and will sell, then you're not a writer, you're a sellout.