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Lucky Joe
March 25th, 2003, 06:37 AM
For those of you that are submitting work to publishers and agents (or anybody that knows something about this) what's the story with submitting to more than one at a time? I understand they prefer you not to do this however I was wondering if anybody knew whether or not submitting to pulishers/agents in different continents at the same time was frowned upon as much as submitting to ones in the same country.

milamber_reborn
March 25th, 2003, 11:53 PM
I agree that it's frowned upon, but I wouldn't blame any writer for sending out loads of stories at once. They take so long to get back to you and unless you're confident you're writing is top notch, most will knock you back anyway. If one or two like your story, you may have saved yourself a long waiting time.

I, Brian
March 26th, 2003, 08:06 AM
If you're serious about submitting, then don't make multiple submissions - and state clearly in your approach letter that you are making an exclusive submission (and please don't frame it in media terms - ie, EXCLUSIVE!).

You've taken a while to write your novel - it took patience. You still need it.

Just one at a time.

That's the the advice I've been seeing all aruond the net. It's a mark of professionalism. That's what the agents/publishers apparently want to see.

Holbrook
March 26th, 2003, 12:42 PM
The thing to do is check each publishers submission details, most will say if their turnaround is six weeks, three months or like Baen nine to twelve...

Some take e.mail submissions these days, These again quote turnaround and it is usually less than hard copy.

Thing is send one out, but have another printed and packaged to go. So the day you get the reject letter you can put the next one in the post on the way to work.

:D

mistri
March 26th, 2003, 03:26 PM
And while you send one out, write another. When you have more than two stories/novels you're trying to sell then submit one to one market, and one to another - so you're multiple submitting your writing style - but not your actual individual books (If that makes sense).

milamber_reborn
March 26th, 2003, 11:34 PM
I'm continually writnig new short stories. Problem here in Australia is I want them all sent to Aurealis (the top zine) first. They're taking months to get back to me which is setting me back. I'll have at least 15 more stories to send before they get back to me.

Holbrook
March 27th, 2003, 12:39 AM
I keep thinking about Robert Heinlein's guidelines for authors:

"Write. Finish what you write. Send out what you finish. Keep writing while trying to publish the first one. Don't rewrite except to editorial direction."

Lucky Joe
March 27th, 2003, 12:51 AM
Originally posted by Holbrook

Thing is send one out, but have another printed and packaged to go. So the day you get the reject letter you can put the next one in the post on the way to work.

That sounds lke a really good piece of advice, even if it is a bit depressing. But the truth of the matter is I've heard from so many people that the trick to being published (or at least one of them) is perseverance.

And I'm already working on my next piece, have been for a couple of months. Will be leaving the first one alone now until I have had a few rejections (Or somebody wants to buy it!:D 'fingers crossed') at which stage I'm might not be able to resist going through it again for another edit.

I'm in it for the long haul, I know there is a very real possiblity I might never make it into print, but I'll keep writing until I do and the more ms's I've got the more publishers/agents I can approach at once.

Gravity's End
April 4th, 2003, 07:38 AM
I agree that if a condition of submission to a publisher is that it be an exclusive submission, the writer should be fair and stick to that. But how can publishers who have 9 to 12 MONTHS as their turnaround time be serious about that policy? That's an inexcusably long period of time, and if they expect me to be 100% honest and make it an exclusive submission, then I will -- to another publisher, and NOT to them. If it really takes them 5 or 6 times longer than other publishers to get back to you, then they're in the wrong business.

juzzza
April 4th, 2003, 08:57 AM
Or, they are in the right business and are very good at it hence the large number of submissions and ridiculous (to the writer) turnaround time.