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dakasmith
April 9th, 2003, 08:49 PM
Hello!

I'm wondering if anyone on this board can help remind me of the title or author of a book that I read (and loved) many years ago. I loaned it to someone immediately after reading it, and, in my usual way, forgot the name.

The story is that a mini black hole arrives in the solar system, and the first known result is that it passes through a jet just off the ground in (I think) San Francisco. It also triggers a major earthquake on the San Andreas fault. It passes in, through, and out of the earth (and into nearby space) over and over and ... as it proceeds through a complex orbit around the center of mass of the earth. Of course, on every pass it absorbs more of the earth's mass, which eventually begins to do great damage (not to mention the visual damage done when it passes through the crust and the lifeforms living on it).

Sound familiar to anyone with a better memory for names than mine?

I'd sure appreciate it!!!

Thanks and cheerio,
Daka

fortytwo
April 10th, 2003, 10:36 AM
Although I haven't read it yet, "Earth" by David Brin had a black hole encountering the Earth. Somehow though I'm not sure you mean that one.

42

dakasmith
April 10th, 2003, 01:47 PM
Hi, 42. Thanks for the suggestion.

I can recommend David Brin's "Earth" as being quite interesting and enjoyable, with believable science, but unfortunately it's not the one....

I had the idea that it might have been a Gregory Benford book, but after reviewing the descriptions of all of his books, it doesn't seem to be. (Or perhaps I've missed a description of a few of his books.) At any rate, the style as I remember it matched closely to Doc Benford's. (What that means to me is the imaginative extension of currently understood scientific elements combined with fairly deep character development, and all developed in a wonderfully deep, extremely well-written 'world.')

Thanks again for taking the time to make a suggestion!

Daka

P.S.
So, I have to ask, with a userID of "42," *are* you the answer to life, the universe, and everything? <grin>

fortytwo
April 10th, 2003, 04:21 PM
Originally posted by dakasmith


......I had the idea that it might have been a Gregory Benford book, but after reviewing the descriptions of all of his books, it doesn't seem to be. (Or perhaps I've missed a description of a few of his books.) At any rate, the style as I remember it matched closely to Doc Benford's. (What that means to me is the imaginative extension of currently understood scientific elements combined with fairly deep character development, and all developed in a wonderfully deep, extremely well-written 'world.')

Thanks again for taking the time to make a suggestion!

Daka

P.S.
So, I have to ask, with a userID of "42," *are* you the answer to life, the universe, and everything? <grin>

daka,
Obviously from your comments it's not "Eater" then.

"So, I have to ask, with a userID of "42," *are* you the answer to life, the universe, and everything? "

I rather think not, especially seeing as I didn't know the answer to your previous question .:)

42

dakasmith
April 10th, 2003, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by fortytwo


daka,
Obviously from your comments it's not "Eater" then.

"So, I have to ask, with a userID of "42," *are* you the answer to life, the universe, and everything? "

I rather think not, especially seeing as I didn't know the answer to your previous question .:)

42

...on the other hand, *being* the answer is a different kettle of fish from *having* the answer....;)

Cheerio,
Daka

P.S.
Yes, you're correct: it's not "Eater," either -- any other possibilities in mind?

Hobbit
April 10th, 2003, 04:56 PM
It's not the Forge of God by Greg Bear is it? It's been a while since i read it but I seem to remember the aliens foretelling the end of the Earth by them.

John Varley's The Ophiuchi Hotline rings a bell too.

It is definitely a novel, is it? Any idea of an approximate publication date?

Hobbit

Kamakhya
April 10th, 2003, 06:27 PM
In the Encyclopedia of SF, it mentions Benford's Artifact (1985), under the listing for black holes. Not having read the book, I can't tell you if this is right.

It also mentions Benford's Beyond the Fall of Night (1990), apparantly a sequel to A.C. Clarke's Against the Fall of Night (1948, 1953).

Kamakhya