PDA

View Full Version : A Scene


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Pluvious
April 10th, 2003, 03:39 AM
How do you go about creating an interesting scene? Do you plan in great detail beforehand or simply have a general idea what should happen?

What I mean is do you have any pre-planned subjects you must discuss in a scene? A lot? Is there an emotion you know you want to get across? How about advancing a theme? Or do you primarily focus on advancing the plot?

Any little bits of wisdom you think about as you write a scene? Like making sure to build suspense or making sure your writing flows like music or anything?

kassimir funk
April 10th, 2003, 04:24 AM
Good question Pluvious,

I'll cite my own work as it's the only basis I have for example.

When I come to a scene that I really want to stand out, I first decide on what it is about it that I want to stand out. Perhaps it's a scene that I want to inspire awe in the reader. In such a case I elaborate a little more on physical detail, with the intent of adding as much realism as I can.

Another situation would be when I want to convey something very dramatic about a character to the reader. The first thing that I do is slow the pace down. Linger longer on the finer points of the characters thoughts and actions and the motivations behind each action. Perhaps, get a little more eloquent with the wording.

Am I explaining myself well?

Regardless of the scene, if I think it's important, I always have a plan for it. I actually have a list of scenes that I want to impress upon the reader. It helps me to keep track of them. Consequently, if there is a scene that you want to stand out a little more than normal, you should ALWAYS revise it until you get it to where you are satisfied with it.

Funny you should mention music. I think that about 90% of my "important" scenes came about from hearing a piece of music. Intersting............

Da Funk

Bardos
April 10th, 2003, 05:59 AM
How do you go about creating an interesting scene? Do you plan in great detail beforehand?

Nay.

or simply have a general idea what should happen?

Aye.

What I mean is do you have any pre-planned subjects you must discuss in a scene? A lot?

Usually, a scene is about something. :D What exactly do you mean? I'm not writing them at random.

Is there an emotion you know you want to get across? How about advancing a theme? Or do you primarily focus on advancing the plot?

Now I get it... Depends on the scene. There are simple, advance-the-plot scenes, or dramatic scenes, or whatever. It really depends on the scene!

Any little bits of wisdom you think about as you write a scene?

Sometimes. But they usually come on their own. I don't like forced bits of wisdom.

Like making sure to build suspense or making sure your writing flows like music or anything?

I try to make the flow easy (like music indeed), though that's not always 100% possible. But a writer must always try to make writing like "lyrics" (and I don't mean that it should rhyme! lol)

wolfie
April 10th, 2003, 07:51 AM
Another good question, this morning! Scenes....

Well, I am not a huge planner, quite frankly. I do not like limiting myself. About the only thing I really plan is the plot and general structure of the story. I leave the rest open to inspiration and hope that my muse has not deserted me!

As far as how I craft a scene...well, depends on the scene, really. If it's important from an emotional perspective, I like to end it on a punch. I think the tendency is to carry a scene out too far, drag it on, when less is often times more effective. So, I try to end those scenes with a zinger or a question.

Action scenes...ooofffff....I suck at action overall, I think, but for those scenes, I try to "map" what I need to happen for the story to proceed and make sense and then fill it in...much like connect the dots. That helps me out.

Dialogue scenes...well, I think carefully about what needs to be said and then have an imaginary conversation with myself to see how it would be said, realistically, and then try to emulate a natural feel. I have had, in the past, trouble with dialogue scenes in the respect that normal people don't talk the way that I tend to write dialogue scenes *smirks...but I'm getting better since I started using this method.

Goodness...I'm not sure that I've helped or hindered. However, I really don't nail down a scene so tightly that I close out inspiration. I have to leave enough room to actually weave the story. I don't like "clinical" writing and I think overplanning is what leads to that.

IaNo
April 10th, 2003, 07:51 AM
hey now. mine rhyme sometimes.

seriously though, flow is very important and rhyme is mostly very annoying. I think creating a scene is a combination of planning and spur of the moment. You need to have some idea of what you are doing but not be too rigid in your plan to accept interesting inspiration that you have while writing it.

Lucky Joe
April 10th, 2003, 08:04 AM
I tend not to plan too much, however I have a lot less trouble with scenes that are planned, but having said that I quite often treat the first draft as a plan and go from there.

I think the major scenes in any story tend to stand out in the authors mind anyway as they are probably (for me at least) the inspiration for writing the story in the first place, and tend to get more attention and seem to come off easier than others parts of the work do.

Hope that makes sense :D