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I, Brian
May 28th, 2003, 02:30 AM
What style do you write in? And which is your preferred style?

I know every story demands to be treated differently, but do you have a preferred trend of, say, writing in third person limited - or are you strictly a first person person?

Also - how well do you like to describe the story environment? How about character - which points do you like to focus on?

As for your story itself - is it mainly character driven? Or do you plan in advance something of the major events you know the characters should reach? Do you actually try and be different with plot?

And themes - do you try and write a human story, or offer philosophical insight, or examine the nature of the universe - or simply a story as a story?

Roll call opened. :)

Bear
May 28th, 2003, 02:53 AM
In general, I write in third person, though more and more of my stuff has been in first lately. Third is nice for storytelling, but there's a little more room for style in first and I'm taking a liking to that.

As for descriptions, I'm usually to the point. I like concise writing. I think imagery and atmosphere are important, but the more I can convey in less words, the better.

I like to focus on character interaction, personalities, quirks and flaws. I don't like perfect characters who never make mistakes, and too much introspection can get old.

I always struggle for a good balance between plot and character development. I'm in love with plot twists, but great characters are a lot of what keep people reading. A good pace helps, too. And with the plot, I try to be as original as possible. I don't see the point in rewriting other people's stories.

I try to include a number of themes in everything I do, but if I had to choose just one, I'd say I work for a very 'human' story. I pay a lot of attention to psychology, but I do my best never to talk about it. I'd much rather have it come out in a characters actions and thoughts.

And what about you, Brian? What are your answers to these questions?

Asraloth
May 28th, 2003, 04:32 AM
the pov i use mostly third person. i like making characters actually react to things. my prose is for the most part very laid back, i sometimes use contractions in the narrative and find it flows much better. with regards to description, i like keeping it simple. if its an everyday scene in a setting almost everyone is familiar with, i won't go into much detail (i hate when authors extoll the beauty of a table or something mundane like that), however i will try my best to vividly describe otherworldly things.
my dialogue i'm told is one of my strengths, mainly because i try not to make my characters, whether a prince, wizard or beggar, speak like they're reading the constitution of a country, rather make them talk like real people.

Holbrook
May 28th, 2003, 05:23 AM
Originally posted by I, Brian
What style do you write in? And which is your preferred style?

I know every story demands to be treated differently, but do you have a preferred trend of, say, writing in third person limited - or are you strictly a first person person?

Depends what I am writing. My novels have been in Third person POV, though I am not heavy on the internal workings in my character's heads. Yes I use their POV's but I try to show them more through their words and actions. In Fact in my novel "The Hat Man" not once is the main character's POV used. It was hard to do. But I didn't want the reader in his head at all. I wanted them to judge him through the eyes of others.

Short stories and my work here, on the Hub thread in the playroom I use 1st, because the nature of the stories demand that. They are more "human" and "emotional journeys" than anything else and need the inner person reflecting on themselves.


Also - how well do you like to describe the story environment? How about character - which points do you like to focus on?

The character's interaction with his world, what he/she believes they are and what they really are.


As for your story itself - is it mainly character driven? Or do you plan in advance something of the major events you know the characters should reach? Do you actually try and be different with plot?

Character, I want the reader to see the world I am creating through them. Not have a paper cut out walkng through a detailed world that has no soul.


And themes - do you try and write a human story, or offer philosophical insight, or examine the nature of the universe - or simply a story as a story?

The human condition used to examine the insanity that is the universe

juzzza
May 28th, 2003, 05:28 AM
An excellent thread.

I tend to use first person POV only in short stories and third person multi POV in longer work.

I love realistic dialogue and use that a lot to 'show' character's personality traits and deliver important aspects of plot development.

All of my stories are character driven, I myself am only a fan of reading character driven tales. Often my plots are fantastic (in the reality sense, not as in how 'great' they are LOL) but I try to leave the Science/Magic in the background and focus on how my characters cope/react in these situations.

Of course description is important but I am not Bret Easton Ellis, describing every button on my character's outfit. I like to use the reader's imagination as much as my words to paint the picture, then my characters 'show' the story as it unfolds.

I was going to create a new thread just before seeing this one so perhaps with IBrian's permission I can ask participants to include who they liken their writing to. Of course we all hope that we add our own flavours to the genre but you can always pick authors you think or hope have a similar style.

For me, Gemmell, Barclay and a little Martin. At least that is what my number one proof reader and critic tells me.

Twelve
May 28th, 2003, 06:39 AM
I like writing from 1st person, and from several different points of views. I like to hear what's going inside a person's head...I like to get deep like that.

12

Bardos
May 28th, 2003, 07:39 AM
What style do you write in? And which is your preferred style?

I know every story demands to be treated differently, but do you have a preferred trend of, say, writing in third person limited - or are you strictly a first person person?

Most of the time, I write in third person selective omniscient POV. I also like writing in 1st person, but not for long. Can't stand it for long; I find it too restrictive for my tastes.

What I haven't done is writing something in many 1st person POVs; I think I might like that better. ;)

Also - how well do you like to describe the story environment? How about character - which points do you like to focus on?

When I write, I try to create an atmosfaire. Sometimes I can do that with less words; other times I need more. But I never write more words than I need.

Characters: I like focusing on their psychology and quirks. Then I can sit and watch how they interact with each other. ;)

As for your story itself - is it mainly character driven? Or do you plan in advance something of the major events you know the characters should reach? Do you actually try and be different with plot?

My stories are mainly character-drive and, hence, the plot is the result of many characters' actions. I don't plan everything ahead of time; I plan enought to beging writing, then I expand my story, as needed.

And themes - do you try and write a human story, or offer philosophical insight, or examine the nature of the universe - or simply a story as a story?

All of the above, mixed. :)

Chlestron
May 28th, 2003, 11:29 AM
I generally write in a limited 3rd person and usually with multiple viewpoint characters.

As for the description of the environment, I am usually relatively sparse on that. I try to give the reader enough of a framework so that they know what I'm talking about, but let them fill in the details.

For characters, I usually don't describe them much more than their build, the color of their hair, and any distinguishing features. I spend a fair amount of time on the POV character personalities and try to give them flaws and have them think in limited terms based on experience and imagination.

I rarely do proactive POV characters and I rarely use villains as POV characters because I like to keep the reader guessing who the villain actually is. The villains are the movers in my world and the characters react to those manipulations but rarely take an active role in pushing the story forward.

I usually have a vague idea of where the story will end up and some of the major scenes I want to include, but the journey there is usually left in the air. I have no qualms with killing off major characters if the situation is right. I try and be different in how the plot is carried out, though for the most part the plot itself is usually repeated from somewhere.

As for themes, I don't actively insert anything in there, but sometimes things crop up.

pcarney
May 28th, 2003, 01:30 PM
I've always found it easiest to write in first person, and this is what I've done in most short stories I've written. Perhaps I'm just lazy- its easier to manage a story when you only have to deal with one person's take on things.

For longer pieces, I'm writing in third person. As there's more story to tell, I find it makes sense to not convine it to one viewpoint.

wolfie
May 28th, 2003, 01:38 PM
Oh, dear...this is a good thread. I write in every POV imaginable. I've even written from a plants perspective and a dog's perspective. I use first person present/past...third person...every story is different with me. And that's how I like it. I love to try something new, expand what I am comfortable doing. And I really don't have a favorite either...just depends on my mood when I feel like writing. But I'm usually happy with the result, at least from the "style" slant.

As for how I write...well, I'm mostly character driven. I've been told I write "mindscapes"...*chuckles*...but I can't help it. I lose myself in my characters. But there are times, when I pull it back and focus on the situation and not so much the characters...let the situation be the story and all else secondary. Those are harder for me, but I keep trying.