PDA

View Full Version : So what sends chills up your spine?


SFFWorld.com
Home - Discussion Forums - News - Reviews - Interviews

New reviews, interviews and news

New in the Discussion Forum


Pages : 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7

Rotting Zombie
May 18th, 2012, 07:54 PM
Ghosts, Zombies, Vampires, Werewolves, etc.

All of the classic monsters.

Tentacled Lovecraftian monstrosities do not really do anything for me. Although I would be scared of one in real life, they do not scare me in fiction.

Bob Gray
May 18th, 2012, 09:45 PM
Ghosts, Zombies, Vampires, Werewolves, etc.

All of the classic monsters.

One of the reasons that IT is #1 for me. The setting is partly in the years of 1957-1958, which makes it very appropriate to have the classic monsters involved (Frankenstein, Creature from the Black Lagoon, Rodan, Wolf-Man, Mummy, a zombie-like leper, and ghosts). Then he adds the creepiest villain of all time, Pennywise the Dancing Clown (Bob Gray) into the mix.

Have you ever read any of these Rotting Zombie?

Great Vampire novels:
Necroscope series by Brian Lumley
The Light at the End by John Skipp & Craig Spector
Lost Souls by Poppy Z. Brite
Bring On the Night by Jay & Don Davis
The Soft Whisper of the Dead by Charles L. Grant
The Shadow Saga by Christopher Golden
Live Girls by Ray Garton
The Traveling Vampire Show, Stake, and Bite by Richard Laymon
They Thirst by Robert McCammon
Vampire$ by John Steakley
Anno Dracula by Kim Newman
Dusk by Ron Dee
Carrion Comfort & Children of the Night by Dan Simmons
Vampire Junction by S.P. Somtow

Great Werewolf novels:
The Howling by Gary Brandner
Ravenous & Bestial by Ray Garton
Murcheston: The Wolf’s Tale by David Holland
Animals by John Skipp & Craig Spector
The Wolf's Hour by Robert McCammon
The Dark Cry of the Moon by Charles L. Grant
Moon Dance by S.P. Somtow
Wolf's Trap, Wolf's Gambit, and Wolf's Bluff by W. D. Gagliani
Frost Bite & Overwinter by David Wellington
Werewolf the Apocalypse tribe novels

Great Zombie novels:
The Rising, City of the Dead, and Dead Sea by Brian Keene
Dead in the West by Joe R. Lansdale
Autumn by David Moody
Monster Island by David Wellington
Day by Day Armageddon by J.L. Bourne

Great Mummy novels:
The Long Night of the Grave by Charles L. Grant
To Wake the Dead by Richard Laymon

That's all I can think of right now.

JONK
May 19th, 2012, 09:41 AM
Ok, hmmmm....

Religious horror

Song of Kali by Dan Simmons
The Ceremonies by T.E.D. Klein
The Scream by John Skipp & Craig Spector


Favorite all time horror novels

It by Stephen King
Pet Semetary by Stephen King
Summer of Night by Dan Simmons
Dark Hollow by Brian Keene


Thanks, Bob!!! All are now on the list!!!

Rotting Zombie
May 19th, 2012, 10:12 AM
Have you ever read any of these Rotting Zombie?

Not yet, but I will definitely have to put them on to my ever growing "to-read" list.:p

Dogman'sBladder
May 19th, 2012, 10:17 AM
The novels that make you feel incredibly uncomfortable while you read them, I think Stephen King's The Shining is a great example. Every time I read the book I just felt nervous for some reason.

Bob Gray
May 19th, 2012, 01:48 PM
The novels that make you feel incredibly uncomfortable while you read them, I think Stephen King's The Shining is a great example. Every time I read the book I just felt nervous for some reason.

There are a few that actual make me uncomfortable reading them:

IT & Pet Semetary by Stephen King
The Return by Bentley Little
Summer of Night & Song of Kali by Dan Simmons
A Dark Matter by Peter Straub
Just about anything Lovecraft does
Phantoms by Dean Koontz
Dark Hollow & Ghoul by Brian Keene
The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar by Edgar Allen Poe
Crimson by Gord Rollo

KatG
May 19th, 2012, 05:02 PM
I do not like horror dolls. My daughter knows I can be tortured with them. Small, scuttley things (not bugs though, bugs and snakes are fine -- I'm talking about small, scuttley things that aren't supposed to exist,) ventriloquist dummies and evil toys that are alive, fuzzy creatures with teeth. Those freak me out. I absolutely hated the Snuggles bear in the toilet paper commercials -- could not watch them. Black oozy stuff in horror writing is unpleasant, and being constantly startled by jumping out things in horror films gets on the nerves. I love vampires because they never, ever scare me, though I'll admit the film Nosferatu was creepy enough to come close. (Consequently, I absolutely loved Shadow of the Vampire -- my favorite William Dafoe role.)

Bob Gray
May 19th, 2012, 05:46 PM
I do not like horror dolls. My daughter knows I can be tortured with them. Small, scuttley things (not bugs though, bugs and snakes are fine -- I'm talking about small, scuttley things that aren't supposed to exist,) ventriloquist dummies and evil toys that are alive, fuzzy creatures with teeth. Those freak me out. I absolutely hated the Snuggles bear in the toilet paper commercials -- could not watch them. Black oozy stuff in horror writing is unpleasant, and being constantly startled by jumping out things in horror films gets on the nerves. I love vampires because they never, ever scare me, though I'll admit the film Nosferatu was creepy enough to come close. (Consequently, I absolutely loved Shadow of the Vampire -- my favorite William Dafoe role.)

I don't like dolls, dummies, or mannequins (especially them). So I guess you are not alone. I do like horror novels with them it it though.

Randy M.
May 21st, 2012, 10:55 AM
Additional vampires:
Dracula by Bram Stoker (I know ... "Well, duh!" ... can't help it if I'm a compulsive completist)
I Am Legend by Richard Matheson
Progeny of the Adder by Les Whitten
Salem's Lot by Stephen King
Interview with a Vampire by Anne Rice (better than you might think)

I'm currently reading David Wellington's 13 Bullets and it is pretty good (though somewhat gory), if you like your vampires in action/adventure format. Because it revolves around a young woman fairly new to law enforcement it is slightly reminiscent of Thomas Harris' The Silence of the Lambs, but even more than that novel stresses action/adventure plotting.


Additional Werewolves:
The Werewolf of Paris by Guy Endore (this is from the 1930s)
The Wolfen by Whitley Streiber (not really werewolves, but plays off the legend)
Sharp Teeth by Toby Barlow


Additional Zombies:
I'm not big on zombies, but my daughter is completely taken with Mira Grant's Feed and Deadline, and chomping at the ... um ... bit for the final book in the trilogy, Blackout, which will be released on June 1. I think others here (Mark? Rob?) have had good things to say about these, too.


Some ghosts/haunted houses:
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Hell House by Richard Matheson
The Woman in Black by Susan Hill
Naomi's Room by Jonathan Aycliffe
House of Windows by John Langan
Lost by Gregory Maguire


If you read short stories, you probably can't go wrong with the Otto Penzler edited The Vampire Archives and Zombies! Zombies! Zombies!.

Werewolves are harder. John Skipp edited Werewolves and Other Shapeshifters and a lot of it is good, but a good portion of it I'm not familiar with. There's also Curse of the Full Moon by James Lowder; again, haven't read it all, but the authors represented are good. A really fine anthology that I wish would be reissued is Bill Pronzini's Werewolf! which, possibly in spite of that title, is a solid anthology

For ghosts, almost any older anthology edited by Richard Dalby or Michael Cox or Michael Ashley would be good. Stephen Jones' put out Haunts late last year; I read a few stories and they were good. Jonathan Oliver's anthology, House of Fear has received nothing but praise in the reviews I've seen. I hope to get to it soon.

For some other ideas,
http://www.sffworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=32378&highlight=October+reading

There are links at the beginning of that discussion that will lead you to still more.

KatG: Have a couple great stories for you: Theodore Sturgeon's "The Professor's Teddy Bear" and Richard Matheson's "Prey." (That last was the basis for the final part of Trilogy of Terror, a 1970s made-for-TV movie. You should also watch the last entry in the 1940s British movie, Dead of Night.)


Randy M.
(Oh, and my wife hated the Snuggles bear, too.)

Bob Gray
May 21st, 2012, 12:02 PM
Some ghosts/haunted houses:
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Hell House by Richard Matheson
The Woman in Black by Susan Hill
Naomi's Room by Jonathan Aycliffe
House of Windows by John Langan
Lost by Gregory Maguire

To add to this list:
The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons
The Shining by Stephen King
The House on the Borderland by William Hope Hodgson
The Beckoning Fair One by Oliver Onions
The Loveliest Dead by Ray Garton
Prey by Graham Masterton
The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne