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Stewart
October 20th, 2003, 12:49 PM
I generally like to have my stories dark in style. You kow slightly gothic sounding (I mean cool Goth not Edgar Allen Poe Goth). Just curious about the way you guys prefer to write.

Dawnstorm
October 20th, 2003, 04:20 PM
How about showing instead of telling?

Somebody write a trivial sentence, say:

He went into the shop and bought a loaf of bread.

And everybody made a paragraph out of that (more versions, if you've got more styles in you). We can then compare the paragraphs, and, maybe learn a bit about style in the process.

The reason I'm suggesting this isn't that I like playing games (which I do), but that I find it hard to (a) define style and (b) describe mine.

I'll add my own version, if you like that idea. I won't be disappointed if you don't. :)

Pollux V
October 20th, 2003, 07:52 PM
I write as unmelodramatically as possible. I try not to sound like a newscaster. Lately I've tried to bring more human depth to whoever is telling the story, the narrator or the main character. Voice may be the most important element of writing for me.

Anyway, Edgar Allan Poe is totally awesome, man. Don't go dissing the master.

Lucky Joe
October 21st, 2003, 06:03 AM
Funnily enough I can best describe my style by telling you what i try not to do rather than by what I do do. I try not to be too wordy (Something I can tell I'm about to fail utterly at in this post!) I try to be descripitive but not overly descripitive, I don't think you need to tell your readers everything about a scene, rather hint at it and let them use their imagination to fill in some of the details, that way I find they place their own perceptions on it and create a more lasting image (Hopefully that makes sense) And lastly I try to credit them with intellegence, I hate it when I read something and the author feels they have to hold your hand throughout the book, I don't think you need to tell them everything, let them figure some things out for themselves.

The other thing I try and avoid is sarcasm, I can't think of any books where this has worked well.

Pollux V
October 21st, 2003, 04:14 PM
IMO, Sarcasm worked well in Catcher in the Rye. I think description/prose depends on who's telling the reader the story, whether it's some nerdy dude living on an egg east of New York, or a redneck on a river with an escaped slave, there are tons of varieties that seem to function to create a good story.

Lucky Joe
October 22nd, 2003, 04:02 AM
I haven't read Catcher in the Rye so I can't comment, perhaps I should have qualified the statement;

The other thing I try and avoid is sarcasm, I can't think of any books where this has worked well.

By Adding that of course this doesn't mean it doesn't work at all, (I'm sure it does) just that it doesn't do it for me and that I haven't read any books where it seemed to work.

Stewart
October 22nd, 2003, 06:44 PM
Darkness always seemed to reveal more than light. Once the ebony sheet of the night descended upon the world everything always changed. Fear, anger, hatred, things that often remained dormant in the brightness of a warm day never had any problem emerging with the darkness. Like shadow they seemed to enshroud the world in their blackened aura and made light seem like a shallow protection against the assaults of the wild world.

Pollux V
October 22nd, 2003, 08:12 PM
Ahh, you really should read Catcher in the Rye. Not everyone likes it, but I believe it to be a fine, fine book. If you start reading it and find yourself enjoying it, you can have the whole thing finished in a weekend.

As for description, using metaphors, similes, big adjectives, that sort of thing, the only guy I can think of that went overboard with them and actually did an awesome job of it was H.P Lovecraft. Read any of his works here (http://www.ech-pi-el.com/lovecraft/works/index.htm). I suggest Celephais, it's quick and shows what the man is all about.

I feel that metaphors, not just any metaphors, but clever, original ones that people can relate to, are the best ways of describing something in a story. I try not to overdoe them, the rest of the time I'd be inclined to do a medium amount of description but, for the most part, leave it up to the audience to figure out what's going on on their own. They find their biggest fears in the things they don't see.

Dawnstorm
October 22nd, 2003, 09:44 PM
Originally posted by Stewart
Darkness always seemed to reveal more than light. Once the ebony sheet of the night descended upon the world everything always changed. Fear, anger, hatred, things that often remained dormant in the brightness of a warm day never had any problem emerging with the darkness. Like shadow they seemed to enshroud the world in their blackened aura and made light seem like a shallow protection against the assaults of the wild world.

Okay, my take:

The sun was no more than half a disk of glowing dark orange on the horizon. Immobile like a statue, T was standing in the sand, gazing in its general direction with half-closed eyes. With that slow, soft voice of he began to speak, "There she goes, and when she's gone the world will shed its hypocricy." He fell silent again. When it became clear he wouldn't explain, I asked, "The world?" His body relaxed, and he turned to look at me. "Like your cute little kitty, curled up in your lap, drowsy from the heat." He gestured towards the fading sun. "Purring little fluff ball... Tell me, do you like to think of what she's doing in the dark?" I rolled my eyes. "Oh, come on, I know she's a predator." I said with a snort. However, when the sun finally vanished I was glad to be a lot taller than my cat.

Sirand
October 23rd, 2003, 06:19 AM
Catcher in the Rye is a brilliant book. The narrator has a really human, distinctive voice.
For those who haven't read it: the main character narrates in a relaxed, sometimes ungrammatical way. It sounds like someone sitting in front of you just rambling on -- he uses lots of everyday cliches, he says "like hell" a lot. It all gives you an incredibly clear picture of the narrator.