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Siolis
October 28th, 2003, 01:52 PM
Yo, I'm new to this forum and i thought i would mention some software i got recently and ask if anyone else owns a copy cus everyone keeps telling me its so grate and i cant decide if its worth the 30 quid i shilled out to get it.

James Barclay
October 28th, 2003, 05:23 PM
I have a feeling the spelling checker is faulty.

If you're serious, lift the lid and tell us the name. If you aren't your thread will be deleted. Please don't waste forum members' time.

Dawnstorm
October 28th, 2003, 06:57 PM
Originally posted by NOM
If you're serious, lift the lid and tell us the name. If you aren't your thread will be deleted. Please don't waste forum members' time.

Newnovelist = title of thread + title of software. Stumped me, too. But googling for "newnovelist" gives you plenty of hits, "newnovelist.com" at the top. :)

Fist
October 29th, 2003, 08:52 AM
I bought it online last week. I'm eagerly awaiting it's arrival in the post and will certainly post results here when I get a chance to use it. I too worry that I may have wasted $30 but am willing to give it the benefit of the doubt until I've tried it.

Hellsfire
October 29th, 2003, 08:50 PM
What exactly is newnovelist and what does it do? I think that the program all writers should get is Write Again. It keeps track of all your submissions, agents, editors, publishers, and breaks it down into various categories. There's a trial version so go see if you like it.

Fist
October 30th, 2003, 04:55 AM
For more detailed (and biased) information go to newnovelist.com where they are selling the product. I bought mine through Amazon though.
I only played with it for about 20 mins last night but my initial impression is that it is restrictive. It tries very hard to categorise the type of novel you want to write. If you use the startu wizard your first multiple choice question is whether your novel is going to be Plot driven, Character driven or an Epic.

How it defines each of these is as follows:

Plot:
Stories falling under the PLOT category are those concerned strictly with plot, in which the characters are there only for the action. They also generally have a happy ending. A good example is the JAMES BOND series.

Most often, works in this Category concentrate on a journey or adventure of the main character, rather than on the character's psychological or emotional transformation.

As a rule, most popular stories use this Category. If you are writing a mystery, western, horror, romance, battle story or spy story it is generally best to use this category. However, if you are writing a story about the spiritual needs of your main character, use either EPIC or CHARACTER, regardless of the genre. If you are trying to make a strong philosophical point, use EPIC.

Character:
This category differs from PLOT stories in that there is always an inner struggle towards a goal. For example, becoming better adjusted to one's age, inner need, or environment. An example here is SCHINDLER'S ARK.

CHARACTER stories share one thing in common with PLOT stories: They always have a happy ending.

Epic:
Epic category stories are about complex characters who are victims of fate. Two well known examples are ROMEO AND JULIET and TITANIC.

Although the characters in an EPIC story have strong inner needs and goals, these desires are frustrated. As such, EPIC stories do not have a happy ending in the ordinary external sense but have instead a spiritual or philosophical message. They always have a tragic ending.

Each of these categories is broken down into story types. For instance, Plot contains the following Story types:
Puzzle, Chase, Catch and Escape, Locale Adventure, Triumphant Victim, ..etc...

So eventually you bore down and begin your story. Helpful files in a menu on the left help you create and store elements of your story like the Hero, Hero's Helpers, The world setting, the antagonist, the antagonist's helpers, etc...

When creating any of these elements it gives you helpful hints. For instance when creating the Main Character(Hero), it asks you to consider the following:
What are some of the Hero's most extraordinary traits and abilities?
What are some of the Hero's major deficiencies?
What are the hopes and dreams of the Hero? The regrets?
What past experience has most deeply influenced the Hero's life?
What does the Hero NOT understand about himself/herself? What errors does the Hero repeat because of that lack of knowledge?
What is the Hero most lacking in his/her life?
What are some of the Hero's favorite things?
What are some things that the Hero dislikes the most?
What does the Hero look like?
What unusual mannerisms does the Hero have?
How does the Hero talk? What kind of language does he/she use? Is he/she very smart?

So I suppose it's useful and helpful for someone with a disordered mind like mine, but it forces you to categorise your story before you start. Is this a good or bad thing? Does it hinder creativity or help it?

Holbrook
October 30th, 2003, 05:18 AM
Just a strange thought, why do you need a computer programme to write a story? Ok, basic information on chapter construction, grammar, use of words etc...


I learned more by trying to write and reading all sorts of types and styles of writing than anything else.

Started with a note book and an electric typewriter (which I still have). Then an old amstrad running windows 3.11, then a new machine running a shaky version of office 2000, then this beast running Windows office XP.

Personally think my best writing tool is my slightly insane mind...;)

Holbrook
October 30th, 2003, 05:21 AM
Originally posted by Hellsfire
What exactly is newnovelist and what does it do? I think that the program all writers should get is Write Again. It keeps track of all your submissions, agents, editors, publishers, and breaks it down into various categories. There's a trial version so go see if you like it.


Errrr..... I use a lever arch file and a desk diary.

Rocket Sheep
October 30th, 2003, 05:35 AM
Hmmmm.... I wouldn't get past the first question... my latest novel is a planetary Marie Celeste type thingy... told at two different points in time by two protags who were once the same age but not any longer... have I lost everyone yet?

Fist
October 30th, 2003, 09:20 AM
It doesn't help you actually write as such. You have to come up with all the words yourself. I think it's more of a tool for providing structure and more easily providing the means for recording, filing and recalling(readily at hand) the elements of your story. Beyond that, the actual writing is up to you as far as I can see from the limited time I've spent using it so far. If you're already experienced at writing and know what you're at, then give this a miss. It seems to my mind more suited to beginner novel writers like myself.