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Pluvious
March 14th, 2004, 06:10 PM
Do you think that first time published author's know they are going to get published with someone or are just hoping? In the majority I mean.

What about everyone here? I could be wrong but it sounds like people around here are mainly hoping at this point? Have you wrote something (maybe something small) that you knew would be published with someone somewhere? Or are you just simply not sure of yourself (ability or whatever) or unsure of what readers want?

What about with a project that you consider your best effort? If you put in all you can (research, writing time, editing process, etc) do you think you will get published? Have you put in your greatest effort yet? Just curious...

milamber_reborn
March 14th, 2004, 08:11 PM
When I first started writing, I was deluded and thought I'd be able to make a splash before long. I soon immersed myself in the industry and realised the truth. Now, I'm optimistically cautious. I now know most of my writing is sub-par, but I do have a few potential gems I'm fine-tuning.

Best effort does not equal best writing I'm afraid. You never know until the end whether a story has a chance. Even then, after months of editing and polishing and lapping up applause from readers, you still only have hope until you receive an acceptance.


BTW, nice avatar Pluvious, complete with pixelated goodness.

Dawnstorm
March 14th, 2004, 10:03 PM
I've never really thought about being published. (I submitted once because someone said I should.) I'm beginning to like the idea, but if they turn me down, no biggie. I'll have to be lucky, because I don't have the tenacity.

===

Pluvious avatar: Isn't that the Heroes of Might and Magic 3 intelligence skill?

user123
March 15th, 2004, 03:47 AM
This may sound like I'm a bit high on myself, but I knew I would be published. Ok, it took a while and I had to deal with a lot of rejection letters, but still I was always sure if I just kept at it I'd see my work in print. It seems to me that to many writers let the rejection get to them, they start thinking "I'm not good enough", "My stuff just isn't up to it" and so on. But if you work at it, use what the rejection letters say to improve your stories, you will get your book in print.

Pluvious
March 15th, 2004, 03:58 AM
Originally posted by Dawnstorm
I've never really thought about being published. (I submitted once because someone said I should.) I'm beginning to like the idea, but if they turn me down, no biggie. I'll have to be lucky, because I don't have the tenacity.

===

Pluvious avatar: Isn't that the Heroes of Might and Magic 3 intelligence skill?

Yeah, that's it. I used to run a heroes 3 online tournament a few years back (Champions of Tymeria) and I used the picture since I had it on my drive. And I like it of course.

kahnovitch
March 15th, 2004, 04:02 AM
I doubt if any of us truly know if we will be published, as the results rely too much on other people, but we all hope.

I have heard the arguement that "if you wirte a truly great story, it HAS to be published by someone at some point."
Not neccessarily, as we can see from many debates on this forum that people don't always look on the same piece of work with the same adoration. Check out the author threads for examples as we have worshippers and loathers of virtually every known author.

In a nutshell: We can try and we may fail, but not to try is the greatest failure of all.

JRMurdock
March 15th, 2004, 09:43 AM
Originally posted by kahnovitch
In a nutshell: We can try and we may fail, but not to try is the greatest failure of all.

That sums up what I would have said as well. Me, I'm confident that I'll be published...eventually. I'm persistant and I haven't let any form rejection letters get me down. When I do actually get a letter with some writing on it giving me any indication that some one has read my work. I'll be elated beyond belief. This means my work is to the point where a person took the time to read my work instead of pulling it off the slush pile and sending a form rejection letter.

In the end, I know I'll get published because I'm stubborn enough to keep my work out there. Only those who are stubborn (or persistant) enough will.

xayaxos
April 29th, 2004, 08:13 PM
Already jaded ...

I've never had anything published nor even submitted anything to be published. I imagine myself at some point in the future getting published, but not any time soon.

Perhaps I don't see it as a reality because I've heard so often from so many people that it's next to impossible to get published. They say it under the guise of "preparing you for the rejection letters" when in fact its rather demoralising and you start wondering: why write at all? - enjoyment of it obviously isn't going to be enough.

Preparation for rejection of your art is fair enough ... but does it have to be drilled into your head so much and so often?

kahnovitch
April 29th, 2004, 09:10 PM
Preparation for rejection of your art is fair enough ... but does it have to be drilled into your head so much and so often?

It's something of an occupational hazard, mate. Part of the training, part of the conditioning.

Nothing that is worth anything is easy.
From learning to walk and talk, to breaking into the market of your choice. It's part and parcel of the experience.

xayaxos
April 29th, 2004, 09:32 PM
It's something of an occupational hazard, mate. Part of the training, part of the conditioning.

Nothing that is worth anything is easy.
From learning to walk and talk, to breaking into the market of your choice. It's part and parcel of the experience.

I get that, but when you were learning to walk people didn't continually say "you're gunna fall" - they said "you can do it! keep trying" ... being honest is one thing, but being negative is another.

Metaphor alert: when you're an aprentice builder, your boss will tell you to wear a saftefy helmet, just in case a brick falls from the top floor. If he drills that caution into you too much, you'll spend all of your time looking at the sky for falling bricks and not notice the pot-hole you're about to walk into.