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Pluvious
March 14th, 2004, 07:28 PM
I know all writers want to be published. Of course. But why should you be published? What makes you special? If you're going to simply say the same thing as someone else do you still "deserve" to be in print? Or does that matter?

Is there at least some small thing that you do well? If you can't pinpoint a strength then maybe more practice or introspection are required?

milamber_reborn
March 14th, 2004, 09:22 PM
An excerpt from an article I wrote:

Style. So what if youíve spun a good tale and your friends and peers provide rave reviews? What separates it from the pack? Why should an editor take the time to read your manuscript when it would make perfectly good bin-liner? Your voice needs to shine through. Anyone can copy the masters and maybe add a new spin or two. Itís all right to tread old ground--consumers are suckers for familiarity--but if you donít bring something new to the table then you are just another pesky amateur vying for the attention of the big suits.

It's an eternal struggle trying to figure out just what makes you worth being published.

For me, it's (hopefully) the effort I put into editing and polishing my stories. Also, I'm learning real quick how to write tightly and effectively. Fewer words, greater impact. Once I refine my style a bit more, I'm hoping it will all fall into place and that I will be able to write more than just the odd quality story among a dozen sub-par stories.

juzzza
March 15th, 2004, 04:56 AM
If any of you do not believe you should be published, then you shouldn't bother submitting your work.

We all know that fantastic writers are out there with amazing fiction that could sit comfortably next to the Jordans and Martins but the majority will never see print. It doesn't matter how polished and well-edited the work is, some of the stuff out there is awful when it is published so god only knows what it was like when it was submitted to an agent or publisher.

When you submit your work it is down to one, or a few individuals, to decide if it is good enough. Quality is subjective and whilst you can do your best to differentiate yourself from the rest of the slush, it doesn't really matter if you believe you deserve it or not (but as I said in opening, you 'MUST' or do not bother).

Of course there are things you can do to definitely get rejected and I would suggest you concentrate on avoiding these. For example, you could ignore the submission guidelines, send un-solicited work when the publisher states strictly that they do not accept it, you could send the wrong kind of query letter or not send one at all, and of course you could send un-edited work with blinding grammatical and/or spelling mistakes on your opening page... By the way I have done all of these.

So to answer the original question, yes of course I 'deserve' to be published, but that does not mean that I will be. And that isn't arrogance, every single person who puts their heart and soul into their writing and manages to create characters and worlds deserves to get published.

But that is me being arty farty and I know what you mean Pluvious. I guess if you have heart, masses of self belief and you compliment that with originality, good editing, great dialogue, quality research, excellent characterization and style... You can't fail, sounds easy don't it :rolleyes:

G'luck...

Oh and of course it's all about who you know rather that what you know... I dunno about you clowns but I'm only hangin' around this flea pit because I know one of you jack@asses is bound to get published soon, then I can pull the old 'help a friend' card on ya :D

user123
March 15th, 2004, 04:57 AM
Being "special" has nothing to do with it and nobody DESERVES to be published. The only reason to get your work in print is to let your voice, your ideas be seen by others. And maybe, just maybe have those ideas strike a cord with someone out there. Someone who may think, 'I understand that, I've felt or thought the same at some point in my life".

kahnovitch
March 15th, 2004, 05:08 AM
Originally posted by user123
The only reason to get your work in print is to let your voice, your ideas be seen by others. And maybe, just maybe have those ideas strike a cord with someone out there. Someone who may think, 'I understand that, I've felt or thought the same at some point in my life".

I wouldn't say that's the only reason, but it is the same reason I write.
It would be nice to make a living as a writer and also maybe make people "think" and open their minds a little to different ideas.
I don't really tell a story for a bit of fun, there is always a message to be conveyed to the reader.

user123
March 15th, 2004, 05:16 AM
I agree, I would love it if I could make a living just writing books, but I'm not going to count on that. And all really great books have something more to them then just telling a good story. They should make the reader think and maybe even question things around them. This is not to say there shouldn't be some fun to the story.

Pluvious
March 15th, 2004, 05:44 AM
Originally posted by user123
Being "special" has nothing to do with it and nobody DESERVES to be published. The only reason to get your work in print is to let your voice, your ideas be seen by others. And maybe, just maybe have those ideas strike a cord with someone out there. Someone who may think, 'I understand that, I've felt or thought the same at some point in my life".

So you think everyone that has a "voice" should be published? I'm not sure I understand. I think my point is that I wish people (potential authors) would take more time to educate themselves in whatever it is they want to write about it. Whether this be the simplest short story to the most complex novel. Just prepare yourself and do everything you can. I don't think getting published should be more important then doing the story and yourself justice is all.

kahnovitch
March 15th, 2004, 05:51 AM
Originally posted by Pluvious
I think my point is that I wish people (potential authors) would take more time to educate themselves in whatever it is they want to write about it.

I think the majority do, as it's hard to tell a believable story without doing some research on your chosed specilaised subject.

Holbrook
March 15th, 2004, 10:01 AM
Originally posted by Pluvious

I think my point is that I wish people (potential authors) would take more time to educate themselves in whatever it is they want to write about it. Whether this be the simplest short story to the most complex novel. Just prepare yourself and do everything you can. I don't think getting published should be more important then doing the story and yourself justice is all.

So do and some don't. Some think spending a few hours looking at internet sites makes them an expert and then they write a story that has so many errors that reading it is like pulling teeth...

Seen it, read the result....

Even if you do everything and I mean everything, you still make small slip ups, you can't be 100% perfect, because you are basing your research on the work and research of others. Especially if it is historical detail/facts, times, which you are using to base a fantasy world on. You are relying on others.

The best way is to read as much as possible and form your own conclusions. This takes time.

In all honestly it took me two years to research my first novel and a year to write it, still researching as I went. When I had finished I could in theory forge and construct a sword using traditional forging methods and modern production ones (helped by sword smiths both in Europe and the USA). I knew the basic use of one, (Helped by WMA groups in the UK) what was possible for the human body to do with one and what a sword did to the human body. I was fairly expert on armour, 13th century, dress, guild systems and way of life. I even developed a sport of stick fighting (with the help of the Fight Style Director off LOTR....)

A lot of work, but it has formed the backbone of every fantasy tale I have told since.... Though I had to do a lot of research into rapier and dagger fighting for my second novel. (Aided that time by a stunt man who worked on Master and Commander....)

;)

Bardos
March 15th, 2004, 10:12 AM
Publishing means mainly money. But, most of the time, even published author can't make a living out of writing.

So, what does publishing mean to me? Published author = good writer? Not necessarily. As the above posters pointed out, there are some 'unredable' books out there. There are, also, some diamonds out there.

Publishing, to me, means very little. If the work is good, then it's good. You can feel a good work, even if you disagree with the story or the writer's views of the world.

I write because I can't remember myself not writing, because it's fun, because it's a way of expresion, and because it makes life much more interesting.