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feitelberg

Did I write a gaming novel?

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About six weeks ago I released my first novel, Aure the Topaz, book 1 of the Aglaril Cycle.

Since then I've gotten feedback from readers (friends of mine) who say this is a gaming novel. And while I understand that fantasy RPG players will probably pick up a few ideas on how to play and react to situations (GMs too, btw), I don't know that I would call it a gaming novel.

The argument for it being a gaming novel is that the characters have classes like in D&D. But if that is true then are all stories will priests, wizards, bards, elves, and necronamcers gaming novels?

I'm thinking no, but others might disagree. On the other hand, if the answer is yes, then are Conan novels gaming novels? What about the Wheel of Time, or Lord of the Rings, or Pern, or Earthsea, or countless others in the swords and sorcery/epic/heroic category?

Where do you draw the line? I ask mostly out of curiosity. Personally, I don't believe my book is a gaming novel but others do and they are entitled to their opinion.

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writing , fantasy

Comments

  1. Jon Sprunk's Avatar
    (A) You wrote a fricking novel. Let that sink in. Of all the people in this world who say they want to write a book, I'd hazard about 5% actually complete the goal. So congratz.

    (B) So what? Gamers are people, too. And some of SFF's best fans. Some excellent writers have written tie-ins and other books that certain folks consider "gamer" books.

    (C) Opinions are like a**holes, everybody's got one. The more you get your writing out into the world, the more critique you're going to receive. Develop a philosophical attitude about it early. You'll sleep better.
  2. feitelberg's Avatar
    Thanks Jon for responding.

    I think part of my point is if my novel is gaming novel is will turn some people off. Of course, probably won't know it is unless told. Your point about gamers being people is a good one. I am a gamer myself. So point taken.

    But the other part of my post is this: if my novel is a gaming novel so are lots of others that I would never describe as such. So why label me if you aren't going label the others?
  3. Jon Sprunk's Avatar
    Human beings like to label things. The important thing is to stay true to yourself and your writing. That unique perspective is something no one can take away.

    I know just how you feel. Take my debut. I got a lot of great praise for it, but some knocked it as 'lacking originality.' Did I want to find those people and shake them and shout "are you insane? Do you know how much depth you've blithely written off with your off-the-hip assessment?" But, in the end, you just have to suck it up and move on. You control the content, but once it goes out into the world, there ain't a damned thing you can do about it.