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  1. #31
    Registered User cloudXXI's Avatar
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    There's a lot of evidence that points to this:

    1. She's introduced in the same fashion 'Her name is Teresa Simmons' / 'Her name was Sammie Jessup' etc.
    2. The flashback sequences at the bar, on the road (with the man dangling from the roof). These are difficult to explain, even as hallucinations.
    3. The encounter with Mitchell in the corridor in which Teresa bizarrely jumps into a bed with a man she clearly despises (Mitchell's actions - especially his words - vaguely remind me of a game player/designer using cheat codes).
    4. Bulverton is described as being a small town in decline with a population made up of people close to or at retirement age, and yet GunHo chooses to build a hi-tech (and presumably expensive) ExEx facility there. Even more surprising is it's overbooked.


    I admit youīre convincing. But....In the most part of Priest books (The separation, The affirmation, The glamour) the narration begins in reality and at one point of the novel it jumps into alternate reality/book fiction/virtuality....For that reason is difficult to me thinking that in The extremes everytingh is virtuality. But, once again, I have to say, maybe youīre right.

    Why donīt you try to writte an e-mail to Mr. Priest (the adress is in his own web) and question him about your theories? I did it, and he was very kind and polite. Beside a great writter, he seems to be a great person.

  2. #32
    Registered User Mugwump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudXXI
    There's a lot of evidence that points to this:

    1. She's introduced in the same fashion 'Her name is Teresa Simmons' / 'Her name was Sammie Jessup' etc.
    2. The flashback sequences at the bar, on the road (with the man dangling from the roof). These are difficult to explain, even as hallucinations.
    3. The encounter with Mitchell in the corridor in which Teresa bizarrely jumps into a bed with a man she clearly despises (Mitchell's actions - especially his words - vaguely remind me of a game player/designer using cheat codes).
    4. Bulverton is described as being a small town in decline with a population made up of people close to or at retirement age, and yet GunHo chooses to build a hi-tech (and presumably expensive) ExEx facility there. Even more surprising is it's overbooked.

    I admit youīre convincing. But....In the most part of Priest books (The separation, The affirmation, The glamour) the narration begins in reality and at one point of the novel it jumps into alternate reality/book fiction/virtuality....For that reason is difficult to me thinking that in The extremes everytingh is virtuality. But, once again, I have to say, maybe youīre right.

    Why donīt you try to writte an e-mail to Mr. Priest (the adress is in his own web) and question him about your theories? I did it, and he was very kind and polite. Beside a great writter, he seems to be a great person.
    Yeah, he reads like a good guy. To be honest cloud, I'd rather not know. As things stand I can keep turning the story over in my mind applying different interpretations. It's fun.

    As Priest says (through proxies) in many of his works - Art is all about personal interpretation. There's no right or wrong answer. This reminds me of the time I watched the Donnie Darko commentary by Richard Kelly. It completely squashed my understanding of the film and I felt a bit annoyed because his perception of the movie was a lot less sophisticated than what I gave credit for.

    Besides, if we know all the answers, we'll have nothing to talk about.

  3. #33
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mugwump
    This reminds me of the time I watched the Donnie Darko commentary by Richard Kelly. It completely squashed my understanding of the film and I felt a bit annoyed because his perception of the movie was a lot less sophisticated than what I gave credit for.
    It's nearly always the viewers/readers/etc or critics of any art form who work the hardest to imbue it with meaning, relevance or 'sophistocation'. For whatever reason the creator is very often unaware or unconcerned by a lot of the interpretations that get pinned to their own work, or they see it as a natural development of the life of the work. I suppose what I am saying is that just because the creator hasn't identified the sophistocation in their own work it doesn't mean that they shouldn't receive the credit for creating work that can be interpreted as such.

  4. #34
    Registered User cloudXXI's Avatar
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    Oh, my god. Thatīs incredible:

    Iīm reading The Quiet woman, and look what I have found:

    Pages 30 & 31, a old woman sends a letter to a young friend telling about her life:

    "I was christened Eleanor Seraphina, and throughout my childhood I was called "Nell" or "Nellie" by mother, and "Seri" by my older brothers. (...) For a few years after I left home I called myself "Seri" because of my brothers. I thought it was a name other young man might find attractive.

    (....)

    I was evacuated to Britain in January 1940. By this time I had joined up with a young englishman called Peter, who had been convalescing in Greece after a serious illness. Ha attached himself to me, and during the long sea voyage back to England we become lovers. It was doomed never to last. he had not entirely recovered from his illness, and was preocupied with his own complicated life at home.

    (....)

    I must tell you about Peter, who came back into my life.


    Doesnīt remind you any book?

    Anyway, you have told:

    There's no right or wrong answer.

    I disagree. Thereīs a right answer, but itīs difficult to find. I donīt think Priestīs books have oppening ends neither loose ends, all the answers are in the books but not everybody find them. And I am one, usually, donīt find them. At least at first read.

    P.D.: This weekend I saw Donnie Dark, disturbing and good movie.
    Last edited by cloudXXI; May 22nd, 2006 at 11:51 AM.

  5. #35
    Registered User Mugwump's Avatar
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    LOL. Good one.

    The Quiet Woman is the only Priest book not in my collection. I wonder if its being re-printed along with the rest of them?

  6. #36
    Registered User odo's Avatar
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    Wow Now I've become deeply interested in "The quiet woman"

  7. #37
    Registered User cloudXXI's Avatar
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    Theorically, you can find The quiet woman in stores but this summer I was in London looking for the book and I didnīt find it.

    Itīs printed-under-demand, so the easiest way to buy it is:

    http://www.play.com/Books/Books/4-/5...n/Product.html

    or amazon, but play.com is free-shipping.

  8. #38
    Registered User odo's Avatar
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    Oh, my beloved play.com...

  9. #39
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
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    I'm starting Inverted World tonight..

  10. #40
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
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    Finished Inverted World. Even though I had a fairly clear idea about what the outcome would be thanks to a careless, plot-ruining review on C.P.'s own website, I was still gripped by the book. I actually think the supposed twist was not really a twist and was quite obvious from fairly early on, but I would say that!

    Still, I loved this book. It had everything I look for in sci-fi: a strange situation that slowly reveals itself, an enigmatic setting and a conjured sense of awe that really works the imagination. The prose was solid and readable and I detected a strong stylistic link to earlier British authors such as John Wyndham and Olaf Stapledon. Characterisation was a bit lacking but possibly in-depth character portraits would just have obstructed the proceedings.

    I have a feeling that C.P. has moved on from books like this now but though I've yet to read any, from what I can tell he still tackles the topics of altered reality and the uncertainty of perception. I read Ubik just before Inverted World and would put them both in the same bracket; books with a purpose - to reveal the truth behind the tragic confusion. Of the two I have to say Dick's novel was far cleverer, but he was already a master of his craft (Priest was still fairly new) though I.W. has a subdued style and refined quality of writing that I much prefer.

    Overall it gets 5 stars from me and I would happily read it again tomorrow (if I didn't have so much else that I want to get to).

  11. #41
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
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    Just bought The Prestige

  12. #42
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
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    ...must be one of the finest attempts to blur genre boundaries that I have ever read. It is equal parts horror, sci-fi, crime novel and, you could argue, alternative history, presented as both a modern narrative and journal and Victorian journal. It is books within books.

    It reminded me a lot of A Picture of Dorian Gray by Wilde, both stylistically and in terms of the use of a technology dressed up as 'magic'. I can say though that The Prestige is a more complex book than APODG, more entertaining and just as skillfully written (particularly given that Priest's prose is a pastiche of Wilde's contemporary style, of course).

    Although I was able to ascertain the majority of what was happening or about to happen as I read I can agree with your comment, Mugwump, that the book would be a quite different read following an initial read (the same could be said of Inverted World). By the end though you have to wonder if you have really understood every thread and even if Priest has provided all the answers - or the means to find the answers - to the questions.

    The one critisicm I would level at it is that
    Spoiler:
    Tesla, one of the real historical figures represented, would undoubtedly have been more intelligent than to overlook the scientific and social importance of the machine he is asked to create!


    Another 5/5 star book. Now I can't wait to start the next Priest book; there aren't many authors like him.

    BTW, did anyone ascertain the significance of the fourth line of numbers (the 1234/23) on the cards in the crypt at the end of the book?
    Last edited by Ropie; June 5th, 2006 at 09:37 AM.

  13. #43
    Registered User Mugwump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ropie
    Although I was able to ascertain the majority of what was happening or about to happen as I read I can agree with your comment, Mugwump, that the book would be a quite different read following an initial read (the same could be said of Inverted World). By the end though you have to wonder if you have really understood every thread and even if Priest has provided all the answers - or the means to find the answers - to the questions.
    I love the way Borden's book about magic is revealed to be anything but.

    Spoiler:
    It's a means by which both Bordens converse with each other. On two or three occasions you read one trying to make sense of the other's words. It's impossible to tell who's written or done what.


    BTW, did anyone ascertain the significance of the fourth line of numbers (the 1234/23) on the cards in the crypt at the end of the book?
    No.

  14. #44
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    There's a very good interview with Christopher in this month's Locus.

    He's also on the front cover!

    Interesting to see both Chris and Harlan Ellison (TM) in the same issue....

    Hobbit
    Mark

  15. #45
    the puppet master ArthurFrayn's Avatar
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    I just found out, that it was Priest who wrote that Book on the Edge of Forever pamphlet. I read it long ago. Somewhat amusing -Ellison is an easy target, but I confess, I fail to see the point in writing such a thing.
    Last edited by ArthurFrayn; June 7th, 2006 at 10:15 AM.

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