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  1. #1
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Reading in July 2005

    Another month..... tell us here what you've been reading this month and whether it was worth it or not....

    Hobbit
    Mark

  2. #2
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    I read Necropolis by Tim Waggoner. A story set in an alternate dimension where all the horror beasties are real and in charge. It is a mystery story with a zombie detective who is searching for an object of power. It was a quick read, not really scary, but had a good bit of humor.

  3. #3
    I just finished reading Conjure Wife, by Fritz Leiber. It was an extremely good read, IMO. The only major weakness in the book is that the concept is a bit dated, but if you can get past that it's a classic. Very refreshing to read a book like that considering the previous horror novel I tried was F. Paul Wilson's The Tomb, which didn't engage me at all

    Currently finishing up Dead in the West, by Joe R. Lansdale. It's one of his best novels, IMO.

  4. #4
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    Conjure Wife

    Sheets, I love Conjure Wife, but it's been ages since I read it.

    What dated the novel? Fashion, prices, politics?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by AuntiePam
    Sheets, I love Conjure Wife, but it's been ages since I read it.

    What dated the novel? Fashion, prices, politics?
    I guess I felt that Leiber's generalizations about gender roles were just a bit too broad. The idea that all women on Earth become witches because of their inherently irrational nature was just a little too much, IMO, and Leiber's justifications for why women settle for living in a patriarchy despite having all this incredible power sounded to me like old fashioned male chauvinism. Especially the whole "If we did our magic openly, men would just take it away because they're just plain better at everything, with their frickin' math and science" explanation

  6. #6
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    Ooh, I had forgotten about that. The sexism was evident in the movie version too, now that I think about it.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by AuntiePam
    Ooh, I had forgotten about that. The sexism was evident in the movie version too, now that I think about it.
    I would like to see the movie. I imagine it's probably not as good as the book but I'm just curious to see what they did with it

  8. #8
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    The movie's worth watching.

    Here's a llink to the movie, at Amazon. It's out in VHS format but not DVD.

  9. #9
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    Bloodsucking Fiends: A Love Story by Christopher Moore. Not really a horror story, but more a sardonic look at life,love and looking good in a black dress. Moore's ability to write witty dialogue and situitations, yet keep his characters human and accessible, marks him as a fine and maybe even a great satirist.

    I will definitely be picking up more by Moore, especially The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove and Practical Demonkeeping, both sound hilariously wild.

  10. #10
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    Christopher Moore is a lot of fun. There is supposed to be a sequel to the vampire book in the works. Not sure if it is really happening or when it will be out.

    Lust Lizard is also very funny. There is a whole group of his books set in the same wacky seaside town in California.

  11. #11
    "Practical Demonkeeping" is a great read! How can you not love a book that has H. P. Lovecraft as a short order cook at the local greasy spoon!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by raggedyman
    "Practical Demonkeeping" is a great read! How can you not love a book that has H. P. Lovecraft as a short order cook at the local greasy spoon!

    Have you read his Bloodsucking Fiends? After that novel, I became a huge fan of Christopher Moore's.

  13. #13
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    I didn't care for Lust Lizard -- the hero was just too dumb, even for a Moore book.

    Loved the others though. Coyote Blue has a Native American character who named his old Buick Riviera -- Black Cloud Follows. It took me a few minutes to figure that out.

  14. #14
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    Who did you think was the hero in Lust Lizard ? I thought it was Kendra, Warrior babe, or the Sea Monster. I thought the cop was just a stoned by-stander.

    I really liked it, it was the first one set in the town, that I read.

  15. #15
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    Hero's probably the wrong word. It's been awhile since I read it. I remember not liking the dumb guy -- was he a cop? I've forgotten details. I couldn't get a handle on that book, where Moore was going with it. I don't think I finished it.

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