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  1. #1
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    Hardcore vs. Entry Level

    Hey! I'm new to this site and the first thing that I noticed, was the use of the statements, Hardcore and Entry-Level. I'm 19 now. English isn't my native language and I only started reading fiction(Mostly Fantasy about three years ago). In that time I haven't come upon anything that I could'nt read or understand.I've read some of Anne Rice's work, almost 80% of David Gemmel's books,a few Forgotton Realms books,The Song of Ice and Fire series(Martin) and The Magician(Currently busy with Silverthorn). Could you plz explain the Hardcore + Entry Level categories to me.I would also be pleased if you could recommend the best books from the top Authors.I like the read a Author's greatest work first.Then I get hooked more easily and have something to spend my salary on...

  2. #2
    Book worm werewolfv2's Avatar
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    hii there.

    well, there are many recommendation threads and somebody will post links to them and shortly I suspect.

    as for your other question, I think it could be summed up by using a couple books/authors you mentioned - Forgotten Realms = a more "entry level" style of reading, Martin = is a more "hardcore" style.

    As for making a recommendation (any forum members wanna guess who Im going to say?) I would tell you to try Steven Erikson. If you have problems with his 1st book (Gardens of the Moon) don't panic, read his second book (Deadhouse Gates) and then re-read Gardens, Erikson isn't for a person that only can read "entry level" but since you have done Martin you should be able to do Erikson.

  3. #3
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    I'm of the thinking that regardless of "hardcore" or "entry level" a good story is a good story regardless.

    However, there are some books that simply make for great introductions to the genre, books that exemplify either one great aspect of the genre or that touches upon many things that make the genre so wonderful. Of course Lord of the Rings fits this bill quite nicely.

    I suppose if a book was "hardcore fantasy" it would refer to other books in the genre, or reading of the book would be enhanced by having read other books in the genre.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B
    I'm of the thinking that regardless of "hardcore" or "entry level" a good story is a good story regardless.

    However, there are some books that simply make for great introductions to the genre, books that exemplify either one great aspect of the genre or that touches upon many things that make the genre so wonderful. Of course Lord of the Rings fits this bill quite nicely.

    I suppose if a book was "hardcore fantasy" it would refer to other books in the genre, or reading of the book would be enhanced by having read other books in the genre.
    I read that aswell...And Hobbit....It got a bit boring at places...
    I think, if Martin plays his cards right, the Song of Ice & Fire series will whip any other Series to 7 Kingdoms come.

  5. #5
    Hyperpower! Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B
    I'm of the thinking that regardless of "hardcore" or "entry level" a good story is a good story regardless.

    However, there are some books that simply make for great introductions to the genre, books that exemplify either one great aspect of the genre or that touches upon many things that make the genre so wonderful. Of course Lord of the Rings fits this bill quite nicely.

    I suppose if a book was "hardcore fantasy" it would refer to other books in the genre, or reading of the book would be enhanced by having read other books in the genre.
    Well played, ser.

    I tend to have a slightly different way of thinking of entry-level and hardcore spec fic reads. Tolkien is obviously the #1 entry-level read because, as Rob states, it beautifully illustrates many of the devices fantasy readers hold dear.

    Having said that, "entry-level" literature can be defined relative to the age/maturity level of the reader. For a real youngin', grade school or junior high, the likes of Weis, Brooks, and Salvatore come to mind. For a bit older or more mature, I would definitely consider Martin to be entry-level, if for no other reason then its huge popularity and thus impact it has on readers' points of view on other books/series. Hardcore, taken in this sense, would include more complicated pieces, like Umberto Eco or Susannah Clarke, or Mieville or Vandermeer.

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