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  1. #46
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Who man, you are all over the place on this one! Let my try and respond.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfa_Jones
    I was in my local Boarders the other day, I noticed that Laurell K. Hamilton's books appeared in the Horror section while Jim Butcher's Dresden Files appeared in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy sections.
    Not surprising, but here in the States both authors are shelved in SFF. Horror is sometimes phased into the Fiction and Literature, depending on where the store is located.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfa_Jones
    While I've never read any of Hamilton's work (there is quite a bit of it considering) as it looks like it's aimed towards a more female readership, from what I've heard it's not much different from Dresden. Based on my Amazon purchases they pushed quite a few books within this genre in my direction and all of them bar Dresden appear in bookshops under the Horror section.
    I suppose Hamilton's Blake books are aimed at females, considing Anita is a femal and tends to pay particular attention to her clothing and accessories. However, thinking about it, Dresden does go through some of the similar ritualistic preparations.

    I'm only on the first Dresden book, so I don't have much experience to speak from, but there are definite similarities, at least based upon the three or four Anita Blake books I read a few years ago. However, Butcher, from what I've heard, does develop his own style, and I am immediatly seeing a good deal more humor in the Dresden books.

    I wouldn't base future purchases by what Amazon.com suggests.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfa_Jones
    Also, does any one think it slightly vain (for lack of a better word) of me not to buy the hardback of Dead Beat (the most recent Dresden file) because I don't like the old covers? The new UK releases now appear in a case folder style cover rather than the art work (which put me off buying the books at the start of the year.

    Also I don't think it's a really a hard back book - I mean I'm glad that they are doing well enough for the publishers to chance hardback but they really are paperbacks.
    I don't think it is vain to want your books from the same author under the same series to look similar, I'm kind of the same way.

    As for "they really are paperbacks" - not sure what you mean by that?

  2. #47
    Palinodic Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfa_Jones
    I was in my local Boarders the other day, I noticed that Laurell K. Hamilton's books appeared in the Horror section while Jim Butcher's Dresden Files appeared in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy sections.

    While I've never read any of Hamilton's work (there is quite a bit of it considering) as it looks like it's aimed towards a more female readership, from what I've heard it's not much different from Dresden. Based on my Amazon purchases they pushed quite a few books within this genre in my direction and all of them bar Dresden appear in bookshops under the Horror section.
    That's because Hamilton was sold both within and without the category fantasy market, as both sff and horror/general fiction. Hamilton was more often marketed as horror/general fiction for awhile until the Blake series became pretty big and then she was marketed more to the sff category. But now that she is a major mainstream bestseller, they are trying to make her the next Anne Rice, so horror is favored. In other bookstores, she may be in the sff section mainly, but it's conceivable they'll eventually take her out of the sff category market altogether.

    Because of the success of her work and other authors doing similar types of stories -- contemporary fantasies with vampires, werefolk, witches, shamans, etc., publishers picked up the term supernatural fantasy and started using it in marketing. Some of the supernatural fantasies have strong suspense and horror elements, so those ones may often end up in the horror section with Hamilton, and may be in sff as well. Others, like Butcher, are seen as having mostly a sff fan base and are for the moment mostly marketed in the sff sections. Still other writers, with romantic or comic elements, may be marketed in sff or in general fiction. It's supernatural fantasy's easy crossover market appeal and cinematic adaptability that help make it a popular sub-genre right now.

    Also I don't think it's a really a hard back book - I mean I'm glad that they are doing well enough for the publishers to chance hardback but they really are paperbacks.
    Technically, all sff books were paperback and hardcovers were rare. But about twelve, fifteen years ago, they decided to try limited hardcover runs on various titles, to try and get more mainstream reviews and more library coverage, and to see if the category mystery model (lots of hardcovers first, then paper,) would work. It did and now anybody who is selling well -- and Butcher is -- is usually put out first in hardcover. Many newbies are as well, at least in small printings. Butcher, I understand, is a lead author for Warner Orbit in Britain, so the hardcovers are unlikely to go away. But maybe they'll change the cover design for you.

  3. #48
    Gentleman and Scholar Wulfa_Jones's Avatar
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    Who man, you are all over the place on this one! Let my try and respond.
    Yeah I know... it was a bit of a random rant!

    As for "they really are paperbacks" - not sure what you mean by that?
    Some books you expect to be published in hard back, the big epics like Erkison, Bakker etc. But the Dreseden books are a) quite thin - would look a little silly in h/b, b) kinda pulp fiction - lightweight reading for the train or something.

    Butcher, I understand, is a lead author for Warner Orbit in Britain, so the hardcovers are unlikely to go away. But maybe they'll change the cover design for you.
    That quite interesting... didn't think he was selling that well over here. While most bookshops tend to have a few of the re-released version of the books, but before the last couple of months I could only find them on amazon.
    I imagine the paper back cover design on Dead Beat will fit in with the others, but I wonder if the hard back jacket on the next release will be the US art work or the UK version...

  4. #49
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    As I posted in the 2006 Releases Read thread, I finished up Charlie Huston's Already Dead earlier in the week and I enjoyed.

    Ficus, you are right it is a bit choppy, at least early on. However, the pace picked up a lot and was really hard to put down once the halfway point hit.

    Interesting take on the Vampyres and while I liked the clans he set up, I felt it was a bit reminiscent of Andrew Fox's two Fat White Vampire Books.* Book 1 and Book 2. I thought the Manhattan setting was good and he left out enough about the Vampyres to leave me asking for more.

    And he does note on his Web site that he's got more books about Joe Pitt in the work, with the second book out later this year.

    *Incidentally, Del Rey is issuing the Mass Market Paperback of Fat White Vampire Blues later this year, I think in the spring. I liked the books and if the MMPB does well, chances are Andrew will get a contract for the third. Ficus, I don't recall if you've read them and what you thought. Did you enjoy his book(s)?

  5. #50
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B
    Interesting take on the Vampyres and while I liked the clans he set up, I felt it was a bit reminiscent of Andrew Fox's two Fat White Vampire Books.* Book 1 and Book 2. I thought the Manhattan setting was good and he left out enough about the Vampyres to leave me asking for more.

    *Incidentally, Del Rey is issuing the Mass Market Paperback of Fat White Vampire Blues later this year, I think in the spring. I liked the books and if the MMPB does well, chances are Andrew will get a contract for the third. Ficus, I don't recall if you've read them and what you thought. Did you enjoy his book(s)?
    I have an ARC of Fat White Vampire. I totally despised it. He is trying to do John Kennedy Toole's A Confederacy of Dunces with a vampire twist. I thought it was disgusting, and then it became racist. Never read the 2nd book, won't read any more of his work. I also didn't like Toole's book, because it seemed the whole thing was built around 'lets-make-fun-of-a-retard'. While wallow in the toilet when there are so many other good things to read ?

  6. #51
    Card Carrying Cynic Blackfish's Avatar
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    What is with all the vampire books?

    Can I just ask when half of the fantasy section in most bookstores became books about vampires? I was browsing at the local B&N last night and before I even made it into the aisles there was a standalone cardboard shelf proclaiming an unheard-of series of vampire books, then I started looking through the shelves and I swear I couldn't get past a single shelf without seeing at least one book that involved a vampire, or family of vampires, or vampire hero, or vampire underworld...etc.

    Don't get me wrong, an occasional vampire story is ok, but there now appears to be an entire sub-genre blossoming and getting heavy attention (granted, maybe the store is trying to capitalize on the 'Underworld' movie coming out, but that doesn't explain all the older books already on the shelves and new ones appearing every day). Anyone else notice this?

  7. #52
    Dropping by to say hello.
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    Thanks!

    Just wanted to drop by and say thanks to Ficus Fan for mentioning my Lawson Vampire series of novels. Hopefully, despite finding them silly, you had fun reading them. Anyway, thanks for the mention!

    Best,
    Jon
    Last edited by JonFMerz; January 20th, 2006 at 01:23 PM.

  8. #53
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    I thought some of you might be interested in my interview with Charlie Huston, which I just posted.
    http://www.sffworld.com/interview/158p0.html

  9. #54
    I like Sherrilyn Kenyon's Dark-Hunter series. I like Kim Harrison's Rachel Morgan series. I like my Harry Dresden audio books but I haven't gotten the actual books yet. Katie Mcalister has two series out which are good for a lighter, more humorous read: her vampire series and her Aisling Gray, Guardian, series. Jenna Maclaine has a vampirey book out which I adore called The Wages of Sin. Laurell Hamilton's rearly Anita Blake books are incredibly addictive. I keep buying the later ones even though I'm really disappointed because I can't stop now and I somehow hope she'll straighten up and find a happy medium between the all-plot-no-sex of the first books and the all-sex-no-plot of the later books. Her Merry Gentry books are kind of the same also.

  10. #55
    Registered User Katya's Avatar
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    I think that Holly Black needs a mention here. Presently she has out two books (both rated as YA, but still excellent) called Tithe and Valient. Both are modern day fairytale books.

    Orson Scott Card's Enchantment would somewhat fit into this catagory, even though they fall back into mideval times occassionally.

    I will take a moment to mention Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. I know that some people will argue that they are more "triller" and not "chiller". I've only read Brimstone, and it seemed fairly supernatural to me. This isn't the first book in the series, but it seemed to still flow well for me.

    John Passarella did an excellent series containing the books Wither, Wither's Rain, and Wither's Legacy. It is a story about witches - a present day witch, and one that comes back to haunt her. It's very well written, and all available in MMPB. I really enjoyed the series. I find that it is also along that fine line inbetween horror and supernatural fiction/modern fantasy.

    Rachel Caine's Weather Warden series is pretty good. It's fairly light and fluffy (the opposite of gritty, I guess), but has some pretty interesting action. My only complaint is that the endings are very ubrupt, and some what "god-out-of-a-box". I still read them, as they are still entertaining.

    I kind of resent Kim Harrison being compared to LKH, only because I think her books are better *blushes* I'm not going to delve into this, as I'm not really a LKH fan, but I think that Rachel Morgan has a lot of things that Anita Blake does not.

    A lot of people that I know love the L.A. Banks series. I've read the first book and had a really hard time with the ebonics. It's well written, and an interesting story, if you can get past all the slang.

    Sparkle Hayter wrote Naked Brunch, which is usually filed under "mystery" in your local bookstore, but is a fantastic werewolf book. I love it!

    There is also E.E. Knight's Way of the Wolf (Vampire Earth Series), but I'm not sure if you would classify that as science fiction (I think that many would, I'm not sure how these things are classified). It took me a long time to get around to reading this one, but it was really good, and really gripping once I finally cracked it open.

    I just finished Brian Keene's The Rising, which is a zombie book. Very good, and very dark. I think this might be a little more on the horror side, as it has very dark human corruption themes as well as the paranormal/demonic activity. It has a sequal, City of the Dead, which is a bit hard to find right now I really enjoyed this one.

    There are more out there, but I am away from my books right now, and I think most of the others I would have mentioned have already been done justice.
    Last edited by Katya; March 2nd, 2006 at 12:46 PM.

  11. #56
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katya

    There is also E.E. Knight's Way of the Wolf (Vampire Earth Series), but I'm not sure if you would classify that as science fiction (I think that many would, I'm not sure how these things are classified). It took me a long time to get around to reading this one, but it was really good, and really gripping once I finally cracked it open.
    Yeah, I don't think I'd classify Knight's books within the realm of the other books in this topic even though he shares the same publishing house with a few of these authors.

    I'm a big fan of his books - good, solid entertainment that works as Science Fiction, Fantasy, Apocalyptic Fiction, Horror and Pulp Fiction. Like I said, no matter how you cut them, they are fun reads. Since I love to pimp what I've done around here, here is an interview I conducted with E.E. Knight last summer.

  12. #57
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    I recently found 3 more newly published books in this mold I think.

    Nightlife by Rob Thurman, 2 brothers who are half-human, half-beastie, on the run in NYC from their beastie father who wants them or their blood for some reason. There is another layer to modern life, which includes magical beasties.

    Working for the Devil by Lilith Saintcrow, a sassy Necromanser, in the modern world, somehow ends up being hired by the devil (fee: she gets to keep her life) to kill a renegade demon, who is of course immortal.

    Operation Vampyr by David Bishop, set on the eastern front of WWII, a German soldier gets mixed up with a Romainian Platoon, who are never seen during the day, and it appears that the Russians they kill, all die in terror. The implication is that the Fuhrer has made a pact with supernatural evil in order to win. It appears to be the start of a series called: Fiends of the Eastern Front.

  13. #58
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    A couple more new books to report.

    Crimson Heir by D.P. Lawson, PB
    This is a vampire chick who plays in a goth band, is on the run from bad vampires who want to bring the shadow realm into the real world, and vampire hunters. She has a protector side-kick: a vampire gunfighter. The back of the book says in the tradition of Laurell K. Hamilton and Charlaine Harris (odd they are 2 very different traditions). So it may be a new series, however it is published by the now bankrupt ibooks.

    The Nymphos of Rocky Flats by Mario Acevedo, TP
    This is about a man who went to Iraq as a soldier and has come back as a vampire. It seems to be a humerous, vampire PI story that makes fun of conspiracy theories, government bureaucracies, and sexual myths.

  14. #59
    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    Some new books to update in this thread:

    Jennifer Armintrout, new series called: Blood Ties . The first book is called The Turning, and is about a new ER doc becoming a vampire and being caught in a war between good and bad factions, with no by-standing allowed. It is pretty good, had violence, gore, and some graphic sex - the characters can't deal with romance so they are just having sex.

    Tall Dark and Dead by Tate Hallaway looks similar to Fangs for the Memories by Kathy Love, though it seems more thriller/mystery oriented than the 2nd book - which is funny and romancey. Looks like more romance in The Vampire's Seduction by Raven Hart

  15. #60
    Palinodic Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    Tis a fest, isn't it! The romance writers are going great guns, can't keep up with them, but Jayne Ann Krentz, who is a pretty decent romance writer, has a paperback bestseller with Ghost Hunter, which might be worth checking out.

    Also, some others, non-romance:

    Keri Arthur – Full Moon Rising (U.S.: Bantam Spectra)
    Marie Brennan – Doppleganger (U.S.: Warner Aspect)
    Jane Lindskold – Child of a Rainless Year (U.S.: Tor)
    Barb & J.C. Hendee – Noble Dead series (U.K.: Warner Orbit) -- or did they get mentioned before?

    Also, Tom Holt, a most excellent comic fantasy writer, isn't really in the supernatural fantasy sub-category, but is coming out with a book that still might be of interest for supf fans -- You Don’t Have to be Evil to Work Here, But It Helps.

    There seems to be further confirmation that Charlaine Harris' work is a go for cable T.V. Anybody hears about scheduling or casting, let us know.

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