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  1. #1
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    SFFWorld's Favorite Books of 2005!

    Well, it is a little bit late, but I've finally tallied the results of our annual Best Of poll. I’d like to thank all of our members for participating, as well as those folks who joined and by posting in the poll. For the record I’ll be using “points” and “votes” to refer to the books on and off the list. “Votes” refers to each appearance on a person’s ballot, or post. Points are the rankings attributed to each book by virtue of where the poster placed them on their list.
    So without further adeiu, here are the results:

    1. The Warrior Prophet by R. Scott Bakker, with nearly 20 more points than the second place book...(Nice going Scott!)
    2. A Feast for Crows by George R. R. Martin

    The rest of the top vote-getters looks like this:
    3. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman
    4. The Wizard Knight by Gene Wolfe.*
    5. Shaman's Crossing by Robin Hobb
    6. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
    7. Knife of Dreams by Robert Jordan
    8. Spin by Robert Charles Wilson
    9. Olympos by Dan Simmons
    10. Memories of Ice by Steven Erikson

    Some additional things to consider

    It may not come as a surprise the two books receiving most first place votes were Scott Bakker's The Warrior Prophet and Martin's A Feast for Crows.

    Just under the radar knocking on #10’s door were the following books, all tied with the same number of votes:

    The Carpet Makers
    Vellum
    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell


    The book with the most total votes (not points) was actually A Feast for Crows. The book with the least amount of votes in the top 10: Memories of Ice – only three people actually voted for the book, but they all ranked # 1 or #2.

    The three books with the most votes not in the top 10 were Judas Unchained by Peter F. Hamilton, Elantris by Brandon Sanderson, and Veniss Underground by Jeff VanderMeer, each with four votes.

    About 80 total books were put in the “ballots,” so to speak, so the nominating field was fairly wide.

    *I decided to add all the votes for The Wizard and The Knight along with those who voted for the book as a single book together. The total tally for The WizardKnight was 15, The Knight – 20, and The Wizard – 14. If you want to remove my calculations for TWK then the list looks something like this:

    1. The Warrior Prophet by R. Scott Bakker
    2. A Feast for Crows by George R. R. Martin
    3. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman
    4. Shaman's Crossing by Robin Hobb
    5. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
    6. Knife of Dreams by Robert Jordan
    7. Spin by Robert Charles Wilson
    8. Olympos by Dan Simmons
    9. Memories of Ice by Steven Erikson & The Knight by Gene Wolfe
    10. Vellum by Hal Duncan, The Carpet Makers & JS&MN

  2. #2
    Book worm werewolfv2's Avatar
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    eh? not many votes for Deadhouse Gates I take it?

  3. #3
    Hyperpower! Jack's Avatar
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    The winna' of SFFWorld's Favorite Books in 2006:

    THE THOUSANDFOLD THOUGHT!

    And the crowd goes wild!

    Just a prediction. Also further smarmy comments: Feast For Crows? *rolls eyes almost imperceptibly*

    But big grats to Bakker, I think TWP earned its position. Though to be honest, I would've placed Anansi Boys above it. Then again, I would've placed Jon Strange at #1, so.

    Thanks for everyone who voted, and please disregard the smarm.

  4. #4
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    If I read TWP in 2005, I would have voted for it, but I actually read the book in 2004.

    werewolfv2 - only three people voted for Deadhouse Gates. A lot of our members read it when it first published in UK/Canada.

  5. #5
    Give me liberty! Ouroboros's Avatar
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    Looks like I'm going to have to read the Bakker trilogy ... its been on my radar for a while.

  6. #6
    Abstainer from Foolosophy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B
    If I read TWP in 2005, I would have voted for it, but I actually read the book in 2004.

    werewolfv2 - only three people voted for Deadhouse Gates. A lot of our members read it when it first published in UK/Canada.
    I likely would have voted for Bakker's book as well had I read last year and not 2004. And while Deadhouse Gates would never have been the pick for the year that I read it, The Bonehunters, I'm not sure about (I guess bending the rules a little I could vote for TTT). It rivals a couple of others but there are one or two I could see surpassing it (it likely would be in the top five as it stands now). No doubt, though the book could make three different years to be judged. Which seems silly to me. But both comments underline the inherent and inescapable flaw in such a judging/ranking tabulation.

    Leaving it open to mass market seems a mistake to me, but as I am happy that any recognition to Bakker takes place, I'll leave to personal tastes that likely are not very egalitarian.

  7. #7
    Just Another Philistine Hereford Eye's Avatar
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    Did Old Man's War get any nods at all?

  8. #8
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B
    10. Vellum by Hal Duncan
    Vellum is the first half of The Book of All Hours. The second half of the duology Ink publishes this year in the UK and I'm assuming next year in the US.

    I think we all know Susanna Clarke wrote Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell.

    The Carpet Makers by Andreas Eschbach, translated by Doryl Jensen

    The author of both Old Man's War and The Ghost Brigades is John Scalzi, and he maintains a fairly popular and interesting blog at http://www.scalzi.com/whatever.

    Sheesh! Did I miss anything else?

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