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  1. #1

    I am kinda new to reading fantasy...some advice would be nice

    I got interested in the Death Gate Series and am currently reading the fourth, Serpent Mage. I enjoy them very much and now am making a list of books that I may like and that are popular. There are so many on there now it will probably take me forever and a day to read them all. But any suggestions on books to add would be greatly appreciated. Already on there are such series as the Wheel of Time, DragonLance, Belgariad, Malloreon, Memory Sorrow and Thorn, Otherland, Elenium Tamouli, Star of the Guardian, Darksword, Rose of the Prophet, Sword of Truth, Running with the Demon, heritage and Magic of Shannara, and Landover. Are any of these not worth even bothering to read, any of these I should start on right after I am done with Death Gate, or any other ones you may suggest? Thanks for your help!
    Chris

  2. #2
    I would actually advice you to stay away from Eddings and Brooks, at least to begin with. In my opinion their series somehow becomes boring after a while, it's the same over and over again.

    Tad Williams Memory Sorrow and Thorn is a great series, and best of all it's complete, so you will not have to wait years for the next book to come out.

    The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb is also another great series that is complete.

    Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan, A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin and Sword of Truth by Terry Goodkind are also great series (the best in my opinion). The only problem is that they are not completed yet, so you'll eventually end up waiting for the next book to be released.

    To be honest with you, I've never read a truly bad fantasy series yet.

  3. #3
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    I would second the advisement to stay away from David Eddings. To me, his series of books were rather shallow. His books really struck me as the proverbial 'paint by numbers' fantasy formula.

    Tad Williams (Memory, Sorrow and Thorn), Robert Jordan (Wheel of Time), Terry Goodkind are good, but they are 'fat' fantasy series - rather large books, so plan to devote some time to them.

    If you liked what you're reading in the Deathgate cycle, I would suggest you next move onto Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman's other series: Dragonlance- Chronicles. Be sure to check that you're getting the original series by Weis & Hickman.

    Probably anything you go with off of the reccomendations on this board you'll be fine with. Much like Bilbo, I haven't read too many fantasy series that I thought were horrible.

  4. #4
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    If you haven't read them already, then I would suggest you start at the very beginning and read The Hobbit and then The Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien.

    After that you really can't go wrong by reading down the list of big name authors such as:

    Feist
    Eddings
    Brooks
    Goodkind
    Martin
    Jordan

    Those should keep you buisy for a good long while.


    True, The Sword of Truth series isn't yet finished, but each book does have it's own plot and a resolution of the story. Each book really just picks up where the previous one left off with a new adventure.


  5. #5
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    Zeddicus makes a very good point about the Sword of Truth and how most of the novels have their own resolutions. Its nice to get a little closure at the end of teh book.

  6. #6
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    I read an interview with Terry Goodkind where he pretty much summed it up by saying...


    My goal is for each book to captivate in its own right as a complete story and at the same time be a part of the larger picture of the series.

  7. #7
    If you're new to fantasy, you may want to try Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman's Dragonlance series, Piers Anthony's Xanth series, RA Salvatore, David Eddings, or George RR Martin. I'd definitely stay away from Terry Brooks, though. While these authors will not win any literary awards, they're quite enjoyable and provides some decent escape if you're new to the genre. I've read many other authors including Robert Jordan, Terry Goodkind, Mercedes Lackey etc. but I've never actually finished reading any of their books so it's unfair for me to comment on them.

    If you want to try something with more depth, I would recommend you try Jack Vance's Lyonesse trilogy which includes the following books:

    Suldrun's Garden
    The Green Pearl
    Madouc

    The third book, "Madouc", won the World Fantasy Award for best novel (and deservedly so). It is filled with witty dialogue, humorous situations, richly-textured sentences, and a complex plot.

    I'd also highly recommend his classic "The Dying Earth". This book was the inspiration for Gary Gygax (and his colleagues) to create the Dungeons and Dragons games. If anybody has ever finished the RPG "Baldur's Gate", you'll see name of Jack Vance in the ending credits. This book was also the inspiration for Gene Wolfe's "The Shadow of the Torturer".

    In addition, I'd also highly recommend Guy Gavriel Kay's "The Summer Tree" which is the first book in the Fionavar Tapestry trilogy. It is a very original work with an unpredictable plot.

  8. #8
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    I really enjoyed Terry Goodkind's books. I am just now reading the fifth one, and I am always on the look out for a new good book. anysuggestions would be greatly appreciated
    Love Always
    Amy

  9. #9
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    I really enjoyed Terry Goodkind's books. I am just now reading the fifth one, and I am always on the look out for a new good book. anysuggestions would be greatly appreciated
    Love Always
    Amy

  10. #10
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    There is one trilogy that will change you -- change your perspective on things -- will make you think about the characters for years to come you'll be AWARE of them somewhere deep and private within you (and yes, I was stunned when I experienced this from a mere fantasy trilogy. Really -- I'm not some sort of flower child of philosophy or anything!) The trilogy is "The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant" by Stephen R. Donaldson. I obviously strongly recommend it. (And stay in there for the first 100 pages or so -- the book changes dramatically thereafter!)


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    I agree, Elena, that is a great trilogy.
    Anyway, my recommendation is Raymond E. Feist and his Riftwar.

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    Go to my website: www.geocities.com/area51/shire/7091
    and read the l;ist of recommended books.

    here's a few of my favorites:
    FANTASY:


    The Master of Fantasy: J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth saga

    Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series

    George R.R. Martin's A Song of Fire and Ice series

    Dennis L. McKiernan's 'Mithgar' Chronicles

    Mickey Zucher reichert's Renshai saga

    Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern

    Tad Williams' The Dragonbone Chair trilogy

    Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos saga
    as well as his follow-up trilogy starting with 'The Pheonix Guards.'

    Raymond E. Feist's Riftwar saga.

    Ray Feist and Janny Wurts Co-Authored Daughter of the Empire
    Follow-up to the Riftwar saga.

    Anything by David Eddings

    L.E. Modesitt's Recluce Saga

    Fritz Leiber's Lankhmar or 'Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser' books.

    Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar series.

    Anything by David Gemmell.

    Harry Harrison's 'Cross and Hammer' series.

    R.A. Salvatore's Demon Trilogy

    Fred Saberhagen's The Book of Swords saga.

    Anything by Tamora Pierce.
    But make sure you get the first in a series, or you might get lost.

    Janny Wurts' Curse of the Mistwraith and Wars of Light and Shadow line of books

    J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter Series.

    Anything by Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. TIGANA


    SCIENCE FICTION

    The Dune saga by Frank Herbert.

    Anything by Michael Crichton.

    The Ender's Game saga by Orson Scott Card.


    enjoy!

  13. #13
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    As a seasoned reader of fantasy, my advice would be depend on your taste. My cousin, who's more into the fast-paced, up-there books, would never be able to digest Donaldson's "Chronicles of Thomas Covenant" one of my all time favourites, or Guy Gavriel Kay's "Fionavar Tapestry". He would also shy away from fat fiction like Tad Williams. Another freind of mine got initiated into fantasy through Donalson's superb books and can't think of going towards "commercialized trash". I for one, really did not like Piers Anthony, and Terry Brooks did not impress me much either. My advice:

    START WITH TOLKIEN!

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    Tolkien is the foundation with which nearly all fantasy as we know it is based and is a good area to begin as most have said. He also based much of his work on Mythology and of course that is often an overlooked interest in the realm of fantasy. I would recomend reading up on much Norse and Celtic mythology especially. Elves, Faeries, Dwarves, and Dragons good old fashioned magic are all some of the common elements of fantasy that carried over from mythology.

    Other than that, I would also recomend "The Legend of Huma" from the Dragonlance series. It is a great and powerful tale, pure fantasy through and through, where the hero defies all odds in classic fashion. Nearly every main Dragonlance book makes some reference through use of a song or story about and to Huma and his great deeds. Of course I would aslo recomend te rest of the Dragonlance series.

    One series I have not seen mentioned here is the Earthsea trilogy. That has always been one of my favorites, especially the last book "The Farthes Shoar." It is trully literature, applying the story's meaning directly to the context of the setting and also to any one in any world, real or not. Good literature of any form should teach you about life's journey in some way.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Giarc's Avatar
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    Good point deemster....mythology and legends were the precursor reading-material that sparked my love of fantasy.

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