Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18
  1. #1
    Where's Tonto zorobnice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    560

    Do you think your age affects what you read??

    I was wondering if the different age groups read different things. Rowling wrote the HP series, yet as an almost 40 I love it, I find my son almost seems to read a different story from it, the same with Paolini. I do seem to prefer books that have adults as the hero though.

    Let me know what you think, teenagers let us know what guys your age are looking for in novels, this will also help me find books for my son.

  2. #2
    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    new york, ny usa
    Posts
    4,633
    I most definitely think that some books are better for adults and vice/versa, though it's possible to read something well before you're able to grasp the subtleties of it intellectually and still have it leave a lasting impression.

    I can read YA fantasy to a degree, but I recognize that it's YA. I can't read YA fiction outside of the fantasy genre though, unless I do it for a specific purpose.

    Kids love Paolini and adults hate him. He's quite different than Rowling.

  3. #3
    Registered User pixter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3
    It's interesting to go back and read books that I read when I was younger. Sometimes it's like reading a totally different book than I remember.

  4. #4
    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    new york, ny usa
    Posts
    4,633
    First time experiences leave more lasting impressions. Though you may love a book the second time around, it's not the same. I read the Trilogy when i was young and it blew me away. Totally. I've reread it many times since and enjoyed it, but the experience was never the same.

    I reread books all the time. At each stage in my life, I learn something different and focus on different aspects. When I'm embroiled emotionally in something that a particular books seems to deal with well, I cleave to it. A later read once I'm over that particular crisis won't have th same impact.

    I read Age of Innocence a few months ago for the second time. I don't remember finding it as visual as an experience the first time as I did this time. I re-read Dr. Zhivago a few weeks ago. I was interested in understanding Nabokov's criticism of Pasternack, something that I never had in the back of my mind when I first read it.

  5. #5
    Ataraxic Moderator KatG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    In the Sea of Tranquility
    Posts
    12,014
    I think it probably effects what I read in that now that I'm older, I'm more interested in going back and reading classic works I never got around to reading when I was younger, while when I was younger, I concentrated on new stories and newer authors. Which is maybe to the good, as I suspect I appreciate classic works and understand them within the context of their time more now than I would back then.

    What has probably effected me more, though, is being a parent. The way I read children's and YA stories and the way I read adult books that feature children is a little different now then it was before they handed me my baby and said, here, keep her alive for the next sixty years.

  6. #6
    Illustrious Gambler saintjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    in a pimped out airship baby
    Posts
    4,528
    I don't think I would enjoy David Eddings nearly as much nowadays. I still have the books somewhere, but I prefer to leave them as a pleasant memory.

    On the flipside, I was kind of shocked when my 11 or 12 year old cousin told me he'd read Deadhouse Gates, but his blase reaction to my questions about it led me to believe he didn't understand very much of what was going on in that book, at least I hope for his sake he didn't lol.

  7. #7
    looking for coffee redhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    201
    sure being of different ages affects what you read. because as we get older, we have more experiences, and i think that helps us appreciate more facets of what we read. it's easier for adults to see the entire picture, especially when it's a novel involving political commentary, or political satire. you're old enough to understand what they are really talking about. (how old is "old enough"? depends on the person)

    as a teenager and then college student, i was interested in action. so that's what i read. tons of science fiction, and my brain zero'ed in on the action.

    now that i'm a few years older, sure, i still love the action, but i can appreciate other aspects and subtleties, often more so than the enjoyable action sequences. it's funny these days, i still get plenty of books from the YA section at the library, and should i run into a swear word, i'm shocked. just shocked!!

    Zorobnice, i'm not sure what your son is into, but when i was a teenager, i couldn't get enough Charles de Lint (contemporary fantasy), Isaac Asimov, Sheri S Tepper (contemporary fantasy/horror), and Ursula K Leguin. at the time, i had zero attention span, so novels with only one or two main protagonists worked well for me.

  8. #8
    Where's Tonto zorobnice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    560
    Redhead, what you say makes sense. In this world of "Instant" the general youth do not want to have to wait for anything to happen, or so I assume. It must be quick, to the point and a lot happening all at once so that you don't get bored.

    My son, like his mates seem to be concentrating on anything that involves gore or is repulsive to us older folk. Blood guts and brains seem to tickle their interest. I can only HOPE that as he gets older his taste will change, afterall how much violence can one digest before it loses it's appeal.

  9. #9
    Kiss my axe! kahnovitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    London /UK
    Posts
    2,534
    Quote Originally Posted by zorobnice View Post
    My son, like his mates seem to be concentrating on anything that involves gore or is repulsive to us older folk. Blood guts and brains seem to tickle their interest.
    Reminds me of the old "video nasties" that were around when I was a kid. We loved them!
    There was an outcry at the time that we'd all turn into homicidal maniacs before we were adults, but watching them now just makes me chuckle.

    Our tastes do change a lot as we grow older. I think we tend to desire more intellectual, emotional or (dare I say) sophisticated stimuli.

    Plus the more literature or any media we are exposed to, the more we recognise themes, trends and cliches that seem to periodically cycle every so often.

    It takes a lot more to "wow" us as we get older as we (or at least I) feel that it's all been done before.

  10. #10
    looking for coffee redhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    201
    Quote Originally Posted by zorobnice
    In this world of "Instant" the general youth do want to have to wait for anything to happen, or so I assume. It must be quick, to the point. . .
    to some extent that's true. or, maybe more for some people, and less for others. as a younger reader, i simply couldn't appreciate a lot of things i was reading about. I knew nothing of losing a loved one, so it didn't effect me the same way when a character lost a parent, or best friend. I'd never been in love, so it didn't effect me when i read about one character's feelings for another. the more experiences i have, the more i feel i can connect to, when characters that i care about go through something.


    Quote Originally Posted by zorobnice View Post
    My son, like his mates seem to be concentrating on anything that involves gore or is repulsive to us older folk. Blood guts and brains seem to tickle their interest. I can only HOPE that as he gets older his taste will change, afterall how much violence can one digest before it loses it's appeal.
    i don't think any of the authors i mentioned would count as that. closest thing i can think of in the world of intelligent scifi/fantasy is Gaiman's sandman series. it's a graphic novel.
    Last edited by redhead; December 4th, 2006 at 04:51 PM.

  11. #11
    Where's Tonto zorobnice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    560
    Baring in mind that a lot of what I said in my previous post is of course a generalisation. But the horro stories and gore stories he reads seems to be the in thing with his mates. I must add as well that illustrated books are appreciate more than those with no illustrations.


    ps. After I gave him his first Asterix, he is hooked, so at least I know he gets some good reading in.

  12. #12
    Ataraxic Moderator KatG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    In the Sea of Tranquility
    Posts
    12,014
    It's been interesting, seeing the kid find stuff. When we accidentally curse, she calls us "80's child" because we let her see some 80's movies like "Back to the Future" and "Goonies" when she was old enough, and of course, the kids there curse plenty, whereas in the movies and books she reads -- the hundreds and hundreds put out for kids now that didn't exist when I was her age -- there's very little if any. Kids don't have shorter attention spans now than back then, but they do have so much available, that they don't spend a lot of time on stuff they don't like.

  13. #13
    Something witty! Bridie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bath
    Posts
    2,793
    Im not so sure if ill be able to word this correctly or get my point across so well but ill give it a go! Also i am unsure as to what you all consider YA fantasy and serious fantasy so excuse me if i get anything wrong and please note that my experiance of reading is much more limited, due to my age.

    As a 14 year old girl you would think "oh well, so long as it has romance itl be okay". I have read only one book of that kind of genre, American girl, or something like that, by meg cabot. It was so boring i had to force myself to read it! however, my friends all read those books and truly enjoy them, when they do read that is. I find that because my friends do not enjoy reading they read more immature books. I myself prefer fantasy such as Robin Hobb and though i think many of you percieve her to be a writer for YA Alison Croggon, whos books i think are almost on the same level as LotR in that they target both adults and YA (i read LotR at 11 and jrr's The Sillmarillion at 12). In a book i look for action and something that makes it unique from what i have preivously read. I do not get bored through the polictical aspects of Hobbs books, however, nor do i only partialy read the more romantic pages of both Hobb & Croggon. I also found Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles to be mesmerizingly beautiful.

    I hope you do not type cast Croggon as a writer for teenage fan girlies and i suggest that you at least give her a go.

    zee, guys my age, they dont read. Try a crime book perhaps, my best friend sometimes reads them and they seem to interest him... kinda...

    Oh and, for the record, i cant stand Harry Potter...

  14. #14
    Ataraxic Moderator KatG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    In the Sea of Tranquility
    Posts
    12,014
    We don't think you are silly at all, birdie, but if you could ease up on the text-messaging-type lower case letters, it would be a little easier to read your post.

    A lot of adults read YA fantasy, and Gary here, writes middle school kids mysteries in his spare time. Alison Croggan's fantasy series is sold as adult fantasy in her home turf of Australia, and as YA fantasy in the U.S. She has a lot of teenage fans, but a lot of adult ones too. Robin Hobb seems to be a favorite writer here at SFFWorld and those who know her have also told us that she is an excellent and generous person, as well.

    We have a lot of teen members who probably are reading a good few years ahead of their peers. I imagine that's a little difficult sometimes, that you find novels boring that your friends like, and they aren't interested in the more adult stuff you like.

    As for girls only liking romance -- surely you've hung out here long enough to know that the female members, while not at all against romance, tend to like violence and gore. So you're in good company. But don't be too hard on Meg Cabot and J.K. Rowling.

  15. #15
    Something witty! Bridie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bath
    Posts
    2,793
    Haha yes, i am in good company here. It does make it slightly awakward because i'll start talking about a book but have to suddenly stop because no-one gets what im saying...

    Okay okay, ill admit it, J.K isnt so bad, but i think the books have gotten progressively worse. And Cabot's book was fun to read but abit slow and well... lacking in gore.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •